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Monday, November 5
 

7:00am EST

Registration Check-in
PLEASE NOTE: Location is in the Upper Lobby of the Francis Marion Hotel. Conference registration is NOT AVAILABLE at the Gaillard Center. Vendor badges for booth staff will be located in your packet on your assigned table for the vendor showcase.

Check in upon arrival to receive your conference badge and attendee materials. Conference badges will be required for entry into conference venues, the reception, and conference shuttles.

The desk will be open the following hours:

Monday, 11/5, 7:00 am - 7:00 pm
Tuesday, 11/6, 7:00 am – 7:00 pm
Wednesday, 11/7, 7:00 am – 7:00 pm
Thursday, 11/8, 7:00 am – 6:00 pm
Friday, 11/9: CLOSED (All registration materials will be moved to the Information Desk on the Mezzanine Level of the Francis Marion Hotel)

Monday November 5, 2018 7:00am - 7:00pm EST
Upper Lobby, Francis Marion Hotel

9:00am EST

Charleston Seminar: Acquisitions Bootcamp
Registration Cost: $225 
Register Now
Add to Existing Conference Registration - log in and click gear icon in the "Actions" column to the right of your 2018 Conference registration information.

Sponsored by MDPI. Offered as part of a joint project with UNC Chapel Hill School of Information and Library Science. This seminar will offer an intensive boot camp on acquisitions from three different perspectives: public services, technical services, and the vendor side. The major emphasis is on the nuts and bolts of the acquisitions process from selecting materials to articulating the return on investment to the parent organization (academic/special/public libraries). Using an active learning approach, attendees will gain pragmatic knowledge of strategies and best practices to manage a variety of material types, such as e-books, print materials, and other e-resources. This class is ideally suited for librarians new to selection and acquisitions workflows.

Topics:
  • Collection Management Overview
  • Budgeting
  • Assessing User Needs / Selecting Materials
  • Acquisitions Workflows
  • Negotiation Strategies & Legal Issues
  • Collections Assessment
  • (E)Resources Management
  • Marketing / Outreach

Speakers
avatar for Megan Kilb

Megan Kilb

E-Resources Librarian, UNC-Chapel Hill
avatar for Rebecca Vargha

Rebecca Vargha

Head, Information and Library Science Library, UNC Chapel Hill
Rebecca Vargha is Librarian, School of Information and Library Science (SILS) at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill since 2001. Her responsibilities as head of this library include collection development, staff supervision, liaison with departmental faculty and the central... Read More →

Sponsors
avatar for MDPI

MDPI

MDPI is a pioneer in scholarly open access publishing and has supported academic communities since 1996. Now, it counts 210 peer-reviewed open access journals.


1:00pm EST

Charleston Seminar: Marketing to Libraries
Registration Cost: $150 
Register Now
Add to Existing Conference Registration - log in and click gear icon in the "Actions" column to the right of your 2018 Conference registration information.


Attention publishers and vendors of library-related materials, we have a workshop just for you! We’ll discuss how to target libraries that will buy your publications, making your marketing budget effective, improving your understanding of the library market, and using library associations to focus your spending. Learn from veterans in the field how libraries buy, who are the library buyers, and how purchasing decisions are made. You can’t afford to miss out on this workshop focused on the library market at the premier international annual library conference focused on book, serial, and electronic resource acquisition. All the major decision makers will be there, and so should you!

Speakers
avatar for Buzzy Basch

Buzzy Basch

Retired, Basch Subscriptions
Buzzy Basch heads Basch Associates. He previously had a career as President of Basch Subscriptions, and Turner Subscriptions, and Vice President Ebsco, and F W Faxon. Buzzy is an active member of ALA,SLA ,Nasig and MLA. He has been an association Treasurer, award recipient, and member... Read More →
avatar for Michael Gruenberg

Michael Gruenberg

Consultant, IOS Press
MICHAEL GRUENBERG is Managing Partner of Gruenberg Consulting LLP, which provides services in the areas of sales force training and assessment, organizational reviews, executive coaching, event planning, market/product evaluation, and negotiation skills. He has more than 30 years... Read More →


Monday November 5, 2018 1:00pm - 4:00pm EST
Calhoun Room, Francis Marion Hotel
 
Tuesday, November 6
 

7:00am EST

Registration Check-in
PLEASE NOTE: Location is in the Upper Lobby of the Francis Marion Hotel. Conference registration is NOT AVAILABLE at the Gaillard Center. Vendor badges for booth will be located in your packet on your assigned table for the vendor showcase.

Check in upon arrival to receive your conference badge and attendee materials. Conference badges will be required for entry into conference venues, the reception, and conference shuttles.
The desk will be open the following hours:

Monday, 11/5, 7:00 am - 7:00 pm
Tuesday, 11/6, 7:00 am – 7:00 pm
Wednesday, 11/7, 7:00 am – 7:00 pm
Thursday, 11/8, 7:00 am – 6:00 pm
Friday, 11/9: CLOSED (All registration materials will be moved to the Information Desk on the Mezzanine Level of the Francis Marion Hotel)

Tuesday November 6, 2018 7:00am - 7:00pm EST
Upper Lobby, Francis Marion Hotel

9:00am EST

All About the User Experience: Researcher Perspectives on Access, Privacy, and Security in Scholarly Communications
Registration Cost: $150 
Register Now
Add to Existing Conference Registration - log in and click gear icon in the "Actions" column to the right of your 2018 Conference registration information.


Presented jointly with the Society for Scholarly Publishing (SSP). Today’s researchers have enough on their plates without having to worry about off-campus access to content, who is monitoring their use of information resources and why, and what happens if there is a security breach. Publishers, platform, and service professionals rarely use their own tools in the way researchers do, so they may not understand the growing frustration around these three intertwined topics. Librarians are often left trying to help confused and frustrated users and trying to communicate with information providers to improve the situation for all. With illegal use of private data, data theft, and increasing demands for more control over personal data, it’s time to hear from researchers about their experiences in navigating the world of content and services within the library and beyond, and craft strategies for staying focused on the user experience. What do researchers think about how platform and service companies should manage the delicate tradeoff between personalization and privacy? How might new regulations affect the provider-researcher relationship? How can libraries manage these same concerns for their researchers? Join us to better understand the end user perspective and the hurdles researchers face daily in conducting their research by hearing directly from them, and leave with strategies for looking at your platforms and services in new ways. With a roundtable format and time for an open mic session, we will craft a lively interactive session to place the focus back on the researcher.

Moderators
avatar for Heather Staines

Heather Staines

Director Business Development, MIT Knowledge Futures Group

Speakers
avatar for Lisa Hinchliffe

Lisa Hinchliffe

Professor/Coordinator for Information Literacy Services and Instruction in the University Library, University of Illinois
LL

Les Lenert

Medical University of South Carolina
avatar for Harish Maringanti

Harish Maringanti

Associate Dean for IT & Digital Library Services, University of Utah
BM

Briana McGinnis

Assistant Professor, College of Charleston
I am a political theorist, specializing in the moral psychology of citizenship, the ethics of migration, punishment, and the history of political thought. I have complementary research and teaching interests in American political development and public law.I am especially interested... Read More →
avatar for David Preston

David Preston

Westvaco Professor of National Security Studies, The Citadel
SQ

Suparna Qanungo

Assistant Professor, College of Nursing; Director, Telehealth Research Program, Center for Telehealth, Medical University of South Carolina
avatar for Jean P. Shipman

Jean P. Shipman

Vice President, Global Library Relations, Elsevier
I will be glad to talk with people about libraries and Elsevier.
RW

Rich Wenger

E-Resource Systems Manager, MIT Libraries


Tuesday November 6, 2018 9:00am - 12:00pm EST
Ashley Room, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

9:00am EST

Data Curation Workshop: Tools and Techniques for Today
Registration Cost: $150 
Register Now
Add to Existing Conference Registration - log in and click gear icon in the "Actions" column to the right of your 2018 Conference registration information.


In the past year we have seen how quickly and easily scientific data can be removed from government websites and rendered inaccessible to the public. Libraries have a resposibility to step inito the breach and provide safe places for data to be stored. In the case of Academic Libraries it is even more important that they not only provide archival storage for data but that they also encourage their faculty to follow good data storage practices. All too often research data is improperly documented and archived, which can lead to headaches for other researchers looking to replicate experiments or sift the data for their own needs.

This workshop will describe good data storage and documentation practices, look at some of the data curation models currently in use by libraries, examine common data types that need to be archived, and give attendees practice in working with these different data types. Attendees should leave the workshop prepared to either pilot a data curation project at their own library or evaluate the needs of an existing project.

Speakers
avatar for Matthew Benzing

Matthew Benzing

Computing and Engineering Librarian, Miami University
I am the Computing & Engineering Librarian at Miami University in Oxford, Ohio. I have a B.A. in English Literature and Theatre History from Miami, an M.S. in Information Science from the University of Tennessee, and an M.S. in Human-Computer Interaction from Rensselaer Polytechnic... Read More →


Tuesday November 6, 2018 9:00am - 12:00pm EST
Cooper Room, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

9:00am EST

Managing Vendor Relationships
Registration Cost: $150 
Register Now
Add to Existing Conference Registration - log in and click gear icon in the "Actions" column to the right of your 2018 Conference registration information.


Libraries and vendors are all too often trapped in the paradigm of swapping content and services for dollars. Pivoting from this transactional model, we will explore answers to questions like the following: How can librarians and vendors collaborate to create better resources and services? What can impede these relationships? What are best practices for working together effectively and ethically? How can we build, negotiate, and sustain these relationships for mutual benefit? And when conflict inevitably arises, how do we deal with it?

This proposal is based on a well-received and well-attended panel held at ALA Midwinter 2018. Building on that Midwinter event, this Charleston preconference features a mix of librarians and vendors who will each present and share stories illustrating principles and practices of good/bad relationship management. They will participate in a moderated discussion drawn from prepared questions and live attendee Q&A. We plan to solicit questions from attendees in advance of the event. We will conduct think-pair-share exercises and potentially small-group workshops to discuss real-world scenarios.

This session is distinctive because it focuses uniquely on vendor relationships. This topic is necessary because these relationships enable and sustain collaborations, facilitate negotiations, and mitigate discord. This preconference is relevant because panelists come from a variety of vendors, institutions, and backgrounds and come primed to address attendees’ expressed information needs.

Speakers
avatar for Jason Chabak

Jason Chabak

Director of Institutional Sales & Business Development, ReadCube
avatar for Lindsay Cronk

Lindsay Cronk

Head of Collection Strategies, University of Rochester
Lindsay Cronk is covered in tattoos and full of strong opinions.
avatar for Allen Jones

Allen Jones

Director, The New School
avatar for Michael Rodriguez

Michael Rodriguez

Collections Strategist, University of Connecticut
:bicycle emoji:
avatar for Christine Stamison

Christine Stamison

Director, NorthEast Research Libraries Consortium
avatar for Kimberly Steinle

Kimberly Steinle

Library Relations and Sales Manager, Duke University Press



Tuesday November 6, 2018 9:00am - 12:00pm EST
Salon II, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401, USA

9:00am EST

Let a Thousand Flowers Bloom: Planting Local Open Educational Resources that Will Spring Up Across the Field
Registration Cost: $225
Register Now
Add to Existing Conference Registration - log in and click gear icon in the "Actions" column to the right of your 2018 Conference registration information.


Open education has emerged as a powerful movement for reducing costs and improving student success. As a community, however, academics have only begun to scratch the surface of the potential for open education to transform the way we share knowledge. By empowering librarians, students, presses, and practitioners to share their expertise and experience, OER can shine a light on underrepresented voices and share cutting edge practices in new and exciting ways. Building on our current IMLS-funded work (LG-72-17-0132-17) on collaborative creation of OER for teaching issues in scholarly communication, this hands-on workshop will prepare you to design an open learning object like a video, lesson plan, game, or hack, that shares your own story and expertise.

Speakers
avatar for Josh Bolick

Josh Bolick

Scholarly Communications Librarian, University of Kansas
I support open access, author's rights, copyright & fair use, and open education programming at the University of Kansas. I'm a presenter for the Open Textbook Network and an OER Research Fellow with the Open Education Group. Ask me about the IMLS Grant I'm pursuing with Will Cross... Read More →
avatar for Maria Bonn

Maria Bonn

Senior Lecturer, School of Information Sciences, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign
Maria Bonn is a senior lecturer at the Graduate School of Library and Information Science at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign as asenior lecturer. She teaches courses on the role of libraries in scholarly communication and publishing. Prior to her teaching appointment... Read More →
avatar for Will Cross

Will Cross

Director, Copyright and Digital Scholarship Center, NC State University Libraries
I'm excited about the relationship between copyright, student agency, and open culture. Recently I've been focused on the Library Copyright Institute, the Open Pedagogy Incubator, the Scholarly Communication Notebook, and the Best Practices for Fair Use in Open Education... Read More →


Tuesday November 6, 2018 9:00am - 4:00pm EST
Salon I, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401, USA

10:30am EST

Refreshment Break
Join us for morning refreshments at the Vendor Showcase! Visit booths and browse while you eat. Food and beverage stations will be located inside the exhibit hall in the Gaillard Center Grand Ballroom, and will be provided for preconferences scheduled at the Courtyard Marriott as well.

Sponsors
avatar for Society for Scholarly Publishing

Society for Scholarly Publishing

The Society for Scholarly Publishing (SSP), founded in 1978, is a nonprofit organization formed to promote and advance communication among all sectors of the scholarly publication community through networking, information dissemination, and facilitation of new developments in the... Read More →


Tuesday November 6, 2018 10:30am - 11:00am EST
Grand Ballroom, Gaillard Center

10:30am EST

Charleston Vendor Showcase
Don't miss Charleston's only day of exhibits. Browse the latest products and services, talk with reps, see demos, and snag cool freebies.  We can't wait to see you there!  

List of 2018 Exhibitors - see the Vendor Showcase Exhibitor Guidebook in your attendee tote bag for more information.

Vendor Showcase Map

2018 Exhibitor Information - Please note that your vendor badges will be available inside the packets on your assigned table at the showcase. If you are not attending the main conference, you do not need to check in at the registration desk in the Francis Marion Hotel.

Tuesday November 6, 2018 10:30am - 6:00pm EST
Grand Ballroom, Gaillard Center

12:00pm EST

Vendor Showcase Luncheon
Lunch is provided for all preconference attendees and Conference registrants on the showcase floor. Food and beverage stations will be located in the exhibits in the Gaillard Center Grand Ballroom.

Tuesday November 6, 2018 12:00pm - 2:00pm EST
Grand Ballroom, Gaillard Center

1:00pm EST

Foundations of E-Resource Acquisitions
Registration Cost: $150 

E-resources are well-entrenched in academic library collections, but many libraries still face challenges related to staffing and managing these resources at scale. Despite the common belief that e-resources require less work than print resources, staff involved with managing these resources quickly discover that these resources do not manage themselves. Considering their heavy usage, significant cost, and importance to library patrons, it is essential that libraries acquire and manage e-resources as efficiently and effectively as possible. Presented by two experienced e-resources librarians with input from a vendor representative, this session will provide an introduction to e-resource acquisitions, its related concepts and workflows, and an overview of supporting tools. Presenters will cover best practices for each stage of the e-resources lifecycle from an acquisitions perspective. The majority of the session will focus on acquiring and providing access to online materials, as well as how to handle changes to e-resources, such as cancellations and title transfers. Throughout the session, participants will also learn about high and low-tech solutions to common problems faced by staff who are responsible for acquiring e-resources for their library’s collection.

Speakers
MH

Maria Hatfield

VP, Integrated Solutions, WT Cox Information Services
Maria Hatfield joined WT Cox Information Services in 2005 and is currently the Vice President of Integrated Solutions. Her experience actively working with publishers, librarians, and library technology has served her well to lead the Integrated Solutions division specializing in... Read More →
avatar for Megan Kilb

Megan Kilb

E-Resources Librarian, UNC-Chapel Hill
avatar for Virginia Martin

Virginia Martin

Head, Continuing Resource Acquisitions, Duke University Libraries
Virginia Martin is Head, Continuing Resource Acquisitions Department at Duke University Libraries. Previously, she held positions as Electronic Resource Acquisitions Coordinator at Duke University Libraries and as Head of Electronic & Continuing Resources Acquisitions at Joyner Library... Read More →


Tuesday November 6, 2018 1:00pm - 4:00pm EST
Salon II, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401, USA

1:00pm EST

Negotiating with Vendors
Registration Cost: $150 - register through main conference registration page 

The introduction of digital content created a new link in the information chain: the license. Almost every librarian responsible for arranging electronic access to information has had to review or negotiate not just prices but contractual terms, adding hours — sometimes frustrating hours at that — to the process of buying materials. But few have legal training, and most non-sales people haven’t spent a lot of time thinking about what underpins successful negotiations.

Negotiating with Vendors brings together librarians and vendors to help you prepare for these discussions. You’ll come away with a better understanding of what is involved in negotiating, why licenses matter, and how to use them to safeguard your rights and ensure that both party’s obligations are made clear. Some of the dizzying legalese will come into focus, and armed with fresh insights you’ll be able to approach license discussions with less anxiety and doubt.

Session Outline:
  • Bruce Strauch starts the session off with a discussion of the legal aspects.
  • Ward Shaw will discuss his experiences leading Uncover.
  • Kasia Stasik from Harassowitz will discuss negotiating from an agent's point of view.
  • Marjorie Hlava will discuss her experience as a business women.
  • Michael Gruenberg will discuss his experiences negotiating both products and services.
  • Adam Chesler from AIP will discuss his experiences as a publisher.
  • Rick Burke will discuss his experiences as a librarian and consortia leader.


Speakers
avatar for Buzzy Basch

Buzzy Basch

Retired, Basch Subscriptions
Buzzy Basch heads Basch Associates. He previously had a career as President of Basch Subscriptions, and Turner Subscriptions, and Vice President Ebsco, and F W Faxon. Buzzy is an active member of ALA,SLA ,Nasig and MLA. He has been an association Treasurer, award recipient, and member... Read More →
avatar for Rick Burke

Rick Burke

Executive Director, SCELC
A long-time attendee of the Charleston Conference, I lead SCELC, a library consortium based in downtown Los Angeles. Since SCELC is very active in licensing e-resources I have spoken at past pre-conferences on negotiation and on e-resource management. I enjoy talking about consortia... Read More →
avatar for Adam Chesler

Adam Chesler

Director, Global Sales, AIP Publishing
avatar for Michael Gruenberg

Michael Gruenberg

Consultant, IOS Press
MICHAEL GRUENBERG is Managing Partner of Gruenberg Consulting LLP, which provides services in the areas of sales force training and assessment, organizational reviews, executive coaching, event planning, market/product evaluation, and negotiation skills. He has more than 30 years... Read More →
avatar for Marjorie M. K. Hlava

Marjorie M. K. Hlava

President, Access Innovations, Inc.
Marjorie M.K. Hlava is President, Chairman, and founder of Access Innovations, Inc. Very well known in the international information arena, she is the founding Chair of the new SLA Taxonomy Division established in August 2009. She is past president of NFAIS (2002-2003), the organization... Read More →
WS

Ward Shaw

Independent Investor
Ward Shaw is a private investor and frequent contributor within the scholarly information community. Previously, he founded and owned the CARL Corporation and UnCover Inc., and served as Chairman and CEO of those companies. He was Executive Director of the Colorado Alliance of Research... Read More →
avatar for Kasia Stasik

Kasia Stasik

Harrassowitz
avatar for Bruce Strauch

Bruce Strauch

Professor of Business Law, Retired, The Citadel
Bruce Strauch, J.D. is a retired Professor of Business Law and Director of the Citadel Mentors Program. He holds degrees from UNC-Chapel Hill and Oxford, is extensively published in the field of copyright and trademark, is the author of nine novels and the publisher of a trade journal... Read More →



Tuesday November 6, 2018 1:00pm - 4:00pm EST
Calhoun Room, Francis Marion Hotel

2:30pm EST

Refreshment Break
Sponsored by Adam Matthew

Join us for afternoon refreshments at the Vendor Showcase! Visit booths and browse while you eat. Food and beverage stations will be located inside the exhibit hall in the Gaillard Center Grand Ballroom, and will be provided for preconferences scheduled at the Courtyard Marriott as well. 

Sponsors
avatar for Adam Matthew

Adam Matthew

Adam Matthew Digital publishes unique collections from archives around the world. We reimagine primary sources, to empower current and future generations to challenge, analyse and debate.


Tuesday November 6, 2018 2:30pm - 3:30pm EST
Grand Ballroom, Gaillard Center

4:00pm EST

Welcome Reception
Sponsored by the Modern Language Association.

Join us at the Vendor Showcase for wine and appetizers to start the Conference off right! Meet friends, network and mingle.

The reception will also feature a fun photo booth in the lobby area of the Gaillard Center, sponsored by Taylor & Francis. Come by to have your picture snapped with friends and colleagues using fun props, and take home a souvenir photo strip. 

Sponsors
avatar for Modern Language Association

Modern Language Association

For more than a century, members of the Modern Language Association have worked to strengthen the study and teaching of language and literature.


Tuesday November 6, 2018 4:00pm - 6:00pm EST
Grand Ballroom, Gaillard Center

5:00pm EST

Juried Product Development Forums
Advanced Registration Required: Invitations will be emailed to all librarian attendees. If you do not receive your invitation, please contact Caroline Goldsmith (caroline@charlestonlibraryconference.com).

The Forums are focus groups designed for publishers and vendors to gather market input from librarians on the development of a particular product or service, and for librarians to discuss market issues with publishers and vendors invited to participate in a forum.The Forum sessions for librarians are intended for library staff and will be closed to other publishers and vendors. Invitations will be sent to registered library workers by email, and there will be a staffed sign-up table at the Conference for attendees to register on-site. In addition, publishers & vendors may invite their customers to sign up for this event. Distributors, consultants or individuals from other companies will be admitted if the participating publisher or vendor has added their name to the list of attendees for their session.Publishers and vendors have a unique opportunity for feedback from librarians regarding the design, features, feasibility or pricing of a particular product or service that addresses internal debates and shortens the sales cycle.

Tuesday November 6, 2018 5:00pm - 6:15pm EST
TBA

5:30pm EST

Charleston Culinary Tour
Cost: $65

Get a taste of Charleston’s many flavors during your culinary adventure with Charleston Culinary Tours. The tour features some of Charleston’s iconic, award-winning restaurants. At each stop, participants will sample local fare while learning about Lowcountry Cuisine both past and present.

Book online or call 843-259-2966  and reference the Library Conference.

Registration and more info.

Tuesday November 6, 2018 5:30pm - 8:00pm EST
TBA

7:00pm EST

First Time Attendees and Up & Comers Reception
Sponsored by BetterWorld Books.

We're inviting all first-time attendees of the conference, as well as any "Up and Comer" award winners that are attending to join us for a welcome reception. Our conference mentors and some of our conference directors will be there to say hello, and to answer questions you may have in advance of the main conference. 

Sponsors
avatar for Better World Books

Better World Books

Whether you are weeding 1,000 or 1,000,000 books, Better World Books will take it, process it, sell it, donate it, and recycle what’s left for FREE.


Tuesday November 6, 2018 7:00pm - 9:00pm EST
Colonial Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel

9:30pm EST

Charleston Ghost and Graveyard Tour
Cost: $25
Register Online

Group rate offered through Bulldog Tours.

Come and walk with us when the sun goes down. The Charleston Ghost and Graveyard Tour gives you an exclusive opportunity to walk inside the gates of one of Charleston’s oldest graveyards after dark. When all the other walking tours are looking in through the wrought iron fence, you’ll be on the inside. Explore the graveyard’s dark corners, closely inspect the headstones to see what you might learn, and take a moment to step across the graves — if you dare.

Learn about the history of Charleston’s graveyards, and hear the stories of the famous individuals who found their final resting place in the Holy City. You’ve heard the spooky Charleston ghost stories, right? Well, now you can experience them on this up-close-and-personal tour that takes you where others won’t. Graveyards are endearing pockets of Charleston — so much so that they are often referred to here as simply “gardens.” We love them — they’re full of history, intrigue, and tales of love and loss.

Don’t forget your flash cameras! You never know what phantom images you can capture…

Tuesday November 6, 2018 9:30pm - 11:00pm EST
TBA
 
Wednesday, November 7
 

7:00am EST

Registration Check-in
Please note location: Upper Lobby of the Francis Marion Hotel. Registration NOT AVAILABLE at the Gaillard Center.

Check in upon arrival to receive your conference badge and attendee materials. Conference badges will be required for entry into conference venues, the reception, and conference shuttles.
The desk will be open the following hours:

Monday, 11/5, 7:00 am - 7:00 pm
Tuesday, 11/6, 7:00 am – 7:00 pm
Wednesday, 11/7, 7:00 am – 7:00 pm
Thursday, 11/8, 7:00 am – 6:00 pm
Friday, 11/9: CLOSED (All registration materials will be moved to the Information Desk on the Mezzanine Level of the Francis Marion Hotel)

Wednesday November 7, 2018 7:00am - 7:00pm EST
Upper Lobby, Francis Marion Hotel

7:30am EST

Continental Breakfast
Join us for a light breakfast prior to the morning plenary sessions.

Sponsors
avatar for ATG Media

ATG Media

ATG Media is the group that includes the Charleston Conference, Against the Grain,  a series of short, open access e-books titled "Charleston Briefings: Trending Topics for Information Professionals", and the "Charleston Voices" monograph series.  ATG Media is a wholly owned subsidiary... Read More →


Wednesday November 7, 2018 7:30am - 8:30am EST
Outside Grand Ballroom, Gaillard Center

8:30am EST

Welcome and Opening Remarks
Wednesday November 7, 2018 8:30am - 8:35am EST
Performance Hall, Gaillard Center

8:35am EST

Opening Keynote - The Future of Research Information: Open, Connected, Seamless
We live in the age of the web. For information professionals in particular, this has been the defining fact of the last 25 years. It has enabled ever greater quantities of research to be published, expanded the range of media we can use, and offered new possibilities for recognising and rewarding research contributions. But such opportunities also bring challenges and pitfalls. If we do the right things, this could be a golden age for research, but to make the most of it we must embrace the original principles that made the web itself such a powerful force.

Moderators
avatar for Anthony Watkinson

Anthony Watkinson

Principal Consultant, CIBER Research

Speakers
avatar for Annette Thomas

Annette Thomas

Chief Executive Officer, Scientific & Academic Research, Clarivate Analytics
Annette Thomas was appointed the Chief Executive Officer of the Scientific & Academic Research business of Clarivate Analytics in September 2017; having served on its board since March 2017. Her career spans nearly 25 years in scientific and educational publishing – most recently... Read More →


Wednesday November 7, 2018 8:35am - 9:15am EST
Performance Hall, Gaillard Center

9:15am EST

Cynthia Graham Hurd Memorial Scholarship Award Presentation
Cynthia Graham Hurd was a librarian for over 31 years in Charleston public and academic libraries. She worked as the branch manager of the popular St. Andrews Regional Library, and as a part-time reference librarian at the College of Charleston. On June 17, 2015, her life ended when a lone gunman entered the historic Emanuel AME Church and killed nine people during a prayer meeting. Cynthia is remembered as a “tireless servant of the community who spent her life helping residents, making sure they had every opportunity for an education and personal growth.” 

Springer Nature is proud to honor the legacy of Cynthia Graham Hurd by awarding a scholarship to a librarian who has demonstrated an active interest in the profession, but has not had an opportunity to attend the Charleston Library Conference due to lack of institutional funding.

Wednesday November 7, 2018 9:15am - 9:20am EST
Performance Hall, Gaillard Center

9:20am EST

Open Scholarship Initiative Update
The Open Scholarship Initiative is a multi-year effort to engage all of the stakeholders involved in scholarly communication activities.  This presentation will briefly review the goals, progress and future plans of OSI.

Speakers
avatar for T. Scott Plutchak

T. Scott Plutchak

Librarian, Epistemologist, UAB (retired)
In 2017 T. Scott Plutchak retired from his position as Director of Digital Data Curation Strategies at the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB).  From 1995 to 2014 he was the Director of UAB’s Lister Hill Library of the Health Sciences.  Prior to that he was Associate Director... Read More →
avatar for Anthony Watkinson

Anthony Watkinson

Principal Consultant, CIBER Research


Wednesday November 7, 2018 9:20am - 9:30am EST
Performance Hall, Gaillard Center

9:30am EST

Data Expeditions - Mining Data for Effective Decision-Making
Beyond library budgets and content usage reports, libraries and consortia are searching, sorting, managing, and hunting for deep data that allows them to understand their environments and represent themselves and their patrons more effectively in these changing and complicated times. But data challenges exist at every turn. Finding data, which is often housed in a variety of disparate sources, is the first challenge but it is immediately followed by measuring, adapting, and distilling data down to the most important factors. Libraries and consortia spend many person hours gathering data from scratch and then deriving information and knowledge from that data to make informed, evidence-based decisions.

In this session, we will hear from leading library experts about their scholarly publishing data hunting expeditions and the innovative ways they access and utilize deep data to inform their discussions and decisions and support their activities.  

Moderators
avatar for Ann Michael

Ann Michael

CEO, Delta Think
Ann Michael is CEO of Delta Think, a consulting and advisory firm focused on innovation and growth in content focused organizations. Ann has worked with clients to help them gain insight into their customers’ needs, define their strategy, build their product and services portfolio... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Ivy Anderson

Ivy Anderson

Associate Executive Director, California Digital Library
Ivy Anderson is the Associate Executive Director and Director of Collection Development at the California Digital Library (CDL), where she oversees a broad range of shared collections activities on behalf of the ten campuses of the University of California system. Before coming to... Read More →
avatar for Gwen Evans

Gwen Evans

Executive Director, OhioLINK
Executive Director of OhioLINK, a library consortium of 120 higher education libraries and the State Library of Ohio and a division of the Ohio Department of Higher Education. Formerly Associate Professor and the Coordinator of Library Information and Emerging Technologies at Bowling... Read More →



Wednesday November 7, 2018 9:30am - 10:10am EST
Performance Hall, Gaillard Center

10:00am EST

General History and Architecture Walking Tour
Cost: $20 each, cash or check only to be paid at tour time
RSVP

The tours will be led by Carol Ezell-Gilson of Broad Street Biz Walking Tours, and will start and end at Washington Park, 80 Broad Street.
 
The tour gives a general overview of Charleston’s history from the colonial era onward – through the Revolutionary War, the Civil War, to the city’s rediscovery and revitalization of the past 40 years. Participants will gain insight into Charleston’s early wealth and culture, viewing the city’s impressive public buildings and private mansions. Visitors will learn of architectural influences and other factors that resulted in modifications to original structures, with explanation of the single house, the double house and dependencies. (2 hour tour)

Wednesday November 7, 2018 10:00am - 12:00pm EST
Washington Park

10:10am EST

Refreshment Break
Sponsors
avatar for Draw it to Know it

Draw it to Know it

Draw it to Know it is the premiere education resource for self-directed learning in medical science; it provides narrated, animated instructional tutorials and clinical correlations.


Wednesday November 7, 2018 10:10am - 10:30am EST
Outside Grand Ballroom, Gaillard Center

10:30am EST

Metadata 2020: A holistic approach to metadata improvements for scholarly communications
In the library community, there have been many efforts to obtain consistency regarding metadata principles, schema, and standards. However, even though much of this work has been robust and thorough, it has primarily been undertaken as by the library community. Communication and collaboration with other communities in scholarly communications will ensure that these efforts are useful and effective more broadly.


Metadata 2020 is a collaboration of over 120 librarians, publishers, service providers, data publishers and repositories, researchers and funders. We have joined forces to address multiple challenges with metadata in scholarly communications, including the need for shared best practices and principles, mapping between schema, assessing metadata evaluation tools, creating a common list of metadata definitions for widespread use across scholarly communications, and communicating incentives for metadata improvements to multiple communities.


In this session, we will outline the work undertaken to date by some of the six Metadata 2020 projects, highlighting challenges and requesting feedback and help in some areas. We will demonstrate areas in which they we have worked to achieve consistency across communities, and test some of these approaches with Charleston delegates to further assess how they resonate with the communities in attendance.

Moderators
avatar for Anthony Watkinson

Anthony Watkinson

Principal Consultant, CIBER Research

Speakers
avatar for Chris Erdmann

Chris Erdmann

Library Carpentry Community & Development Director, The Carpentries
avatar for T. Scott Plutchak

T. Scott Plutchak

Librarian, Epistemologist, UAB (retired)
In 2017 T. Scott Plutchak retired from his position as Director of Digital Data Curation Strategies at the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB).  From 1995 to 2014 he was the Director of UAB’s Lister Hill Library of the Health Sciences.  Prior to that he was Associate Director... Read More →
avatar for Howard Ratner

Howard Ratner

Executive Director, CHORUS
Howard is the Executive Director of CHORUS. Over the past two decades, he played a key role in developing innovative technology solutions that have transformed scholarly communications. He co-founded and chaired ORCID – Open Researcher and Contributor ID system, and was active... Read More →



Wednesday November 7, 2018 10:30am - 11:15am EST
Grand Ballroom 1, Gaillard Center

10:30am EST

Spring is here! Cultivating agency through emerging community-owned solutions: Usage Analytics, Institutional Repositories, and Resource Sharing
Despite increasing need for efficiency and widespread availability of technology, there seems to be less choice in the library marketplace, and libraries are finding themselves with much less leverage to secure the options they need. Consolidation among major library technology providers has put libraries in a position to choose: Do we buy it from a vendor, build it ourselves, or something in-between? Several recent community- owned solutions have emerged to address diminished choice in the marketplace and libraries’ growing desire for agency over their services. These initiatives are work-intensive, but essential if libraries are to remain in the driver-seat in negotiation, software functionality, and interoperability, empowering the community to select the most appropriate paths. After a quick introduction to each project, panelists will discuss aspects of agency: why we need it, what it looks like, and its biggest challenges. Our goal is to share our passion for community-owned solutions and motivate audience members to invest in them.

Moderators
avatar for Jason S. Price

Jason S. Price

Director of Licensing Services, SCELC

Speakers
SH

Sebastian Hammer

President, Index Data, LLC
avatar for Kirsten Leonard

Kirsten Leonard

Executive Director, PALNI
Kirsten Leonard is the Executive Director of Private Academic Library Network of Indiana (PALNI) in Indianapolis, Indiana.  She oversees fourteen full and part-time staff and coordinators who are working to support innovation and collaboration. Kirsten holds a MLIS from Wayne State... Read More →
avatar for Jill Morris

Jill Morris

Executive Director, PALCI
Jill Morris is the Executive Director of the PALCI Consortium (Pennsylvania Academic Library Consortium, Inc.), made up of 70 academic and research libraries in PA, NY, NJ, and WV. For more than ten years, Jill has enjoyed working for large library consortia where her primary responsibilities... Read More →



Wednesday November 7, 2018 10:30am - 11:15am EST
Grand Ballroom 3, Gaillard Center

10:30am EST

“They Didn’t Teach This in Library School”: Identifying core knowledges for beginning acquisitions librarians
Library workers new to acquisitions or taking on new acquisitions duties can find themselves lost without appropriate resources. We often hear the refrain of “they didn’t teach this in library school.” Basic introductions to issues confronting acquisitions librarians can be hard to find and out of date. Meanwhile, emerging issues are addressed in journal literature, but few reviews of the issues are available to provide background to newcomers. While professional development opportunities strive to provide sure footing to acquisitions newcomers, we can often fall short, leaving our new colleagues feeling adrift.

Through a positive and structured discussion we will explore the existing and emerging areas of acquisitions that new librarians, librarians new to acquisitions, and even experienced acquisitions librarians can feel unprepared to navigate. We will use several discussion formats to examine topics like: what new acquisitions librarians don’t (and do) know starting out; areas we feel most uncertain and unprepared; what we feel is essential knowledge for starting acquisitions librarians; and best formats for delivering professional development in these areas.

Results of the discussions will be collected, synthesized, and widely distributed as an agenda for introduction to acquisitions professional development. We hope that they will encourage additional opportunities for professional development based on the expressed needs of new acquisitions librarians.

Moderators
avatar for Cris Ferguson

Cris Ferguson

Assistant Dean of Libraries / Associate Professor, Murray State University

Speakers
avatar for Lindsay Cronk

Lindsay Cronk

Head of Collection Strategies, University of Rochester
Lindsay Cronk is covered in tattoos and full of strong opinions.
avatar for Rachel Fleming

Rachel Fleming

Scholarly Communications Librarian, University of Tennessee at Chattanooga


Wednesday November 7, 2018 10:30am - 11:15am EST
Grand Ballroom 2, Gaillard Center

11:30am EST

A Tale of Two Systems: Open Educational Resources and Affordable Learning Solutions
American student loan debt, at $1.5 trillion, has now surpassed the total US credit card debt. In response, librarians, educators and government officials are looking for ways to make required course materials more affordable. As the impact of rapidly rising textbook prices often makes students have to choose between required course materials and other life essentials, academic libraries are feeling more pressure to respond. This panel will cover the different yet kindred approaches taken by the Alabama and California state systems in tackling this long-standing issue.

One method for cutting student expenses is by replacing costly traditional textbooks with open educational resources (OER), which are teaching and learning materials that you may use and reuse. OER are typically available in a variety of formats, both no-cost digital and low-cost print. This makes courses, and college as a whole, more accessible, particularly for lower income students. Recognizing these and other benefits, state agencies that support higher education in Alabama, the Alabama Virtual Library (AVL) Council and academic libraries are working in tandem to make educators aware of the resources’ benefits and promoting adoption of them. This panel will describe how the Alabama Commission on Higher Education promotes OER while respecting “academic freedom,” identifies potential funding sources, shares best practices, while also highlighting some potential challenges.

Another option is the approach of the California State University System (CSU). In response to the rapidly rising costs of course materials the Chancellor's Office of the CSU and state authorities have initiated a program called Affordable Learning Solutions (ALS) (https://als.csuprojects.org/) to address the problem. Individual CSU libraries actively participate in the ALS process, but there has been little coordination between libraries. This started to change in 2018 when CSU libraries initiated the development of a shared textbook acquisition program. The panel will review the scope of the ALS initiative and discuss the emergence of the textbook program. In addition the results of a CSU-wide “textbook survey” will be reviewed, and practical strategies and solutions to the challenges of textbook acquisitions will be discussed within the context of the CSU and beyond.

Speakers
avatar for David Hellman

David Hellman

Collection Development Coordinator, San Francisco State University
David Hellman is the Collection Development Coordinator and an Associate Librarian at San Francisco State University. He has held previous positions at Santa Clara University, New York University and the Brooklyn Public Library. David has presented at several conferences including... Read More →
avatar for Ron Leonard

Ron Leonard

Director of Special Initiatives, Alabama Commission on Higher Education
For the last year, Ron Leonard has held the newly-created position of Director of Special Initiatives at the Alabama Commission for Higher Education. As such, he manages two, large statewide projects, a FAFSA completion project and an OER initiative, and several smaller projects... Read More →
avatar for Neil Sorensen

Neil Sorensen

Sales Specialist Sr, ProQuest Books
GW

George Wrenn

Head of Information Resource Management, Humbolt State University



Wednesday November 7, 2018 11:30am - 12:10pm EST
Colonial Ballroom, Embassy Suites

11:30am EST

Accessibility & Publishing: Practices for equitable access and maximum impact
What are publishers, vendors, and libraries doing to make publications accessible—to readers with print disabilities and to readers facing other barriers to access? This panel will address this question from various perspectives to give audience members a sense of the accessibility and publishing landscape today, and a look at promising practices that may change that landscape in the near future.


Panelists from university presses, vendors, and libraries will outline current practices in their respective fields and outline the ways in which those fields are changing. We will focus on the practical matters of making books accessible to readers with print disabilities and on the transformational possibilities of incorporating accessible practices into every aspect of the scholarly communication lifecycle.


Audience members will interact with leaders in the field during Q&A and will learn about resources to explore further, including the 2018 Charleston Briefings book, Accessibility & Publishing.

Speakers
avatar for Susan Doerr

Susan Doerr

Associate Director, University of Minnesota Press
Susan Doerr, the Associate Director at the University of Minnesota Press, is a twenty-two year publishing veteran with experience in literary, corporate, and scholarly publishing and distribution. Susan manages the Manifold Scholarship (www.manifoldapp.org) partnership with the CUNY... Read More →
SR

Stephanie Rosen

Accessibility Specialist, University of Michigan
Stephanie Rosen promotes the accessibility of scholarship, publishing, and teaching in her work as Accessibility Specialist at University of Michigan Library. Her background is in teaching and media organizing in the areas of queer, feminist, and disability thought. She has worked... Read More →
avatar for Peter Alan Smith

Peter Alan Smith

Executive Professor in Residence, College of Charleston School of Business
avatar for Emma Waecker

Emma Waecker

Senior Product Manager for eBooks, EBSCO Information Services
Emma has been at EBSCO Information Services for 9 years, and is currently Senior Product Manager for EBSCO eBooks. She is passionate about all things user experience, and has recently been focused on advancing the accessibility and mobile responsiveness of the EBSCO eBooks experience... Read More →



11:30am EST

Adapting Library Workflows to Accommodate Transferred Journals
Effective electronic resources management is comprised of ever evolving complex processes. One especially challenging component is to seamlessly ensure continuity of access and service to transferred journals, or journals that have changed publishers. The aspect that is particularly problematic throughout this process is the tracking of these changes. In the past at Rowan University Library, this process had not been monitored proactively. The concern today is to ensure that these changes are tracked so as to not interrupt the user’s research.

The library has addressed this challenge by implementing workflows that use the National Information Standards Organization (NISO) Enhanced Transfer Alerting Service, which is a feed notifying subscribers of journals transferred from one publisher to another. In addition to the Enhanced Transfer feed, the Journal Transfer Notification Database has made it easier than ever for libraries to track transferred journals. This presentation will illustrate Rowan University Library’s transferred journal management procedures and how these have evolved over time to improve the user experience, our eresources and collection management workflows, and to incorporate institutional best practices.

Speakers
avatar for Christine Davidian

Christine Davidian

Electronic Resources and Serials Librarian, Rowan University
avatar for Jennifer Matthews

Jennifer Matthews

Collection Strategy Librarian, Rowan University



11:30am EST

Advancing Discovery Throughout the Scholarly Communications Workflow
Each year, in excess of two and half million scholarly articles are published. When you add to this the different versions of these articles, the data which underpins these articles, along with other academic outputs such as conference proceedings etc, the wealth of information available to researchers is growing rapidly. Researchers need to be able to discover, access, and share this information in order for it to be put to its proper use – the development of future discoveries. Publishers are actively engaged in methods to help researchers connect with very specific resources that meet their needs. This starts with advising authors how to be specific in their use of titles, keywords and abstracts, and travels the full route through scholarly communications by offering accurate classification in metadata and participating in programs to make use of Google Scholar a more satisfying experience. This session will seek to cover a broad array of techniques and technologies that are in use or under development to enhance the experience of researchers as consumers of scholarly content. During this time we will ask how are publishers helping librarians and their users make the most of their collections? What are the barriers in their way? What are they not doing that they should be? What role does technology have in helping both publishers and librarians ensure researchers have access to the content they need?

Speakers
avatar for Amira Aaron

Amira Aaron

Associate Dean, Scholarly Resources, Northeastern University Libraries
Amira Aaron is currently the Associate Dean for Scholarly Resources at Northeastern University, where she is responsible for collections, technical services, and information access and discovery. Previously, she was Director for Information Resources at Brandeis University and also... Read More →
avatar for Daniel Hook

Daniel Hook

CEO, Digital Science
avatar for Jaco Zijlstra

Jaco Zijlstra

Vice President in Product and Platform Group, Springer Nature
Jaco Zijlstra is VP, Products and Platforms at Springer Nature.  Jaco has over 25 years of experience in the digital publishing business, ranging from scientific publishing to education and business to business. He worked for Elsevier Science for 16 years, starting with Elsevier’s... Read More →


Wednesday November 7, 2018 11:30am - 12:10pm EST
Calhoun Room, Francis Marion Hotel

11:30am EST

E-book is Not a Four-letter Word. (Or, how we reduced anxiety and increased liaison confidence in acquiring and engaging our users with e-books.)
Update: download presentation and related resources here:

https://bit.ly/2RAiwy1

As the landscape of e-book publishers, platforms, and acquisition models continues to shift and expand, librarians and staff working in collection development and acquisitions do their best to stay on top of ever-changing decision-points and workflows.

At the William H. Hannon Library at Loyola Marymount University, twenty librarian-liaisons are also expected to stay informed of new or changing options when it comes time to select a format for monographs in their subject areas. But selection is a secondary responsibility for most of our liaisons, and information about changes in our e-book collection development shared via email or even through semi-regular face to face liaison meetings often fails to “stick.” As a result, many liaisons continue making selection decisions about e-books based on outdated or incomplete information, or in some cases become overwhelmed and omit e-books from their decision-making process altogether.

As if frustration during the selection process weren’t enough, public services librarians also reported challenges with helping our users understand the increasing complexities of selecting and using e-books for their research.

In order to prevent “e-book” from becoming a profane phrase, staff in Acquisitions & Collection Development decided to see what we could do to increase communication and reduce e-book anxiety for our liaisons both as selectors and in their roles working with end-users.

At this presentation, which will be of interest to librarians and e-book vendors or publishers alike, attendees will learn about the development and implementation of a two-hour interactive E-book Boot Camp designed to increase LMU librarians’ knowledge and confidence in making informed decisions about e-book selection in GOBI and in providing support to our students and faculty. Attendees will leave with a template for in-house professional development that can be adapted for use at their own institutions.

Speakers
avatar for Jamie Hazlitt

Jamie Hazlitt

Librarian for Collection Development & Evaluation, Loyola Marymount University



Wednesday November 7, 2018 11:30am - 12:10pm EST
Grand Ballroom 2, Gaillard Center

11:30am EST

Flipping the model: A values-based, consortial approach to journal negotiations
Session co-authored by Georgie Donovan, Associate Dean for Collections and Content Services  at William and Mary Libraries, who was unable to attend the conference. 
In negotiating journal pricing, the disadvantages libraries face are well documented. Diminishing library budgets, vendor consolidation, an ever-expanding availability of e-resources, and rising inflationary costs have created chronic, unsustainable subscription pricing. Pricing issues are exacerbated by traditional negotiations, where libraries begin negotiations based on the offers made by publishers and vendors. Big package deals, while lowering the costs per article and expanding access to research resources, have conversely increased overall costs, which disproportionately consume library budgets, and fenced off large swaths of content from cancellation. Frustratingly, when attempting to break from all-encompassing access models, institutions find publishers offering a smaller number of titles for only slightly, if any, less money. When this is coupled with the loss of researcher access, and the increased staffing needed to manage individual subscriptions, the issues are clear.

Potentially sustainable pathways are emerging, including Open Access and read/publish models. Although not yet able to meet all needs, they hold the most promise for a scholarship ecosystem that more fairly accounts for publication costs, the contributions of the academy, and the public good. And although libraries are ready to make a leap now, there are real long-term institutional trust and communication risks to not providing researchers access to the materials these deals currently provide, however unsustainable.

This presentation details the efforts of a task force within VIVA (Virginia’s academic library consortium) to create a bridge-solution between the current acquisition model and the future vision of its members. Using data analysis, existing models, and the power of the collective, this radical consortial approach allows for both flexibility and sustainability. Most importantly, it frees up member institutions to establish distinctive collections, while creating the necessary space, to make significant progress on the conversion to Open Access.

Speakers
BB

Beth Blanton-Kent

Collections Librarian, University of Virginia Library
avatar for Cheri Duncan

Cheri Duncan

Director of Scholarly Resources & Discovery, James Madison University
Cheri Jeanette Duncan is the Director of Scholarly Resources & Discovery at the James Madison University and a frequent presenter at professional conferences. For over 24 years, she has served in various positions and leadership roles within JMU Libraries, ranging from cataloging... Read More →
avatar for Edward Lener

Edward Lener

Associate Director for Collection Management, Virginia Tech
Edward Lener is Associate Director of Collection Management in the University Libraries at Virginia Tech and College Librarian for the Sciences. Edward is the university's representative to the Collections Committee of the VIVA library consortium and a co-author of the book Graduate... Read More →
avatar for Genya O'Gara

Genya O'Gara

Deputy Directory, VIVA
Genya O’Gara is the Associate Director of VIVA, the academic library consortium of Virginia, which represents 72 higher education institutions within the Commonwealth. She received her MSLS from UNC-Chapel Hill, and her BA from the Evergreen State College.


Wednesday November 7, 2018 11:30am - 12:10pm EST
Grand Ballroom 3, Gaillard Center

11:30am EST

Increasing E-Resources Provision in Caribbean Law Libraries: Are These Collection Development Practices Acceptable?
Academic librarians are being asked to ensure provision of a percentage of their collection in electronic formats. This requirement is heavily based on a perceived need to work smarter and more efficiently to support virtualisation for anywhere, anytime access. This has led to a budget shift towards virtualisation and digital collections. A critical question is whether this shift is acceptable to users of academic law libraries. The presenter will focus on:
• Whether the needs of law students and faculty are enhancing or inhibiting this mandate for collection development managers to increase e-resource content provision, in an increasingly global electronic information environment.
• The nature of Caribbean students and faculty’s changing expectations for e-resources access provision,
• The challenges faced by on campus, off campus and mobile users, and
• Recommendations for academic law libraries, with lean budgets, when considering collection development shift to e-resources.

Speakers
avatar for Myrna Douglas

Myrna Douglas

Head, Law Librarian, Law Branch Library, University of the West Indies (Mona Campus)


Wednesday November 7, 2018 11:30am - 12:10pm EST
Rutledge Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403, USA

11:30am EST

Inspec Analytics: Beyond Scientific Discovery
Sponsored by The IET.

See how Inspec Analytics gives you unparalleled insights into your organisations research, scientific trends and global collaborations in Engineering & the Physical Sciences

Speakers
TA

Tim Aitken

Senior Product Manager, Inspec, The IET
Tim Aitken joined the Institution of Engineering and Technology in 2016 as Senior Product Manager of Inspec, having worked in scientific data management for over 15 years. Tim graduated in Chemistry & Computing from Brighton University, and began work as a software developer, developing... Read More →

Sponsors
avatar for The IET

The IET

The Institution of Engineering and Technology publishes world-class engineering & technology content, including journals, books, conference proceedings and the world-renowned Inspec database.


Wednesday November 7, 2018 11:30am - 12:10pm EST
Gold Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel

11:30am EST

Is Your Library Prepared for the Reality of Virtual Reality? - What you need to know and why it belongs in your library!
VR is no longer just gaming. It’s increasingly being deployed across academic campuses, and is becoming indispensable in fields ranging from the humanities to engineering to anthropology. A recent survey indicated that 100% of ARL campuses were using VR, with 40% of libraries actively supporting it. This presentation will show practical examples of how libraries are helping their institutions build out virtual reality, utilizing 3D objects and will explain why the library is the best place to do so. It will provide a basic grounding in VR and related areas, showing what it is and why it's important to libraries. Carl Grant will present case studies of how he’s successfully deployed AR/VR by the library across the campus at the University of Oklahoma and Stephen Rhind-Tutt will present examples of how specific disciplines are creating new content databases in VR.

Speakers
avatar for Carl Grant

Carl Grant

Interim Dean of Libraries, Oklahoma University
Dean (Interim) of The University of Oklahoma Libraries, a facility that has been undergoing a rapid transformation for the last five years. Here is a link to our latest annual report that shows the scope of work being done here: https://issuu.com/oulibraries/docs/ou_libraries_pro... Read More →
avatar for Stephen Rhind-Tutt

Stephen Rhind-Tutt

President, Coherent Digital, LLC


Wednesday November 7, 2018 11:30am - 12:10pm EST
Ashley Room, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

11:30am EST

Know when to Hold ‘Em, Know when to Fold ‘Em: Using Data to Streamline Weeding
Libraries often have large legacy print collections that occupy significant space and are frequently considered the heart of the library. In the ever growing environment of e-resources, many libraries are rethinking print collections and attempting to make informed decisions on what to keep and what to discard. But how do you decide? Listen as two university libraries discuss how they used data to improve retention decisions. This session will detail how a small but scrappy group of Iowa State librarians and library staff used Greenglass to manage the leviathan that is a large-scale library project, withdrawing approximately 138,000 items in just under three years. They didn’t examine every item nor consult every possible stakeholder – instead they used librarian expertise to determine a threshold of what to automatically keep and automatically weed; subject specialists then examined the rest of the data. Learn how they worked with Greenglass staff to get the data they needed. In addition, learn how librarians at Fresno State collect and analyze local usage data for deselection. They will discuss how data is gathered and how it is used to weed a variety of different collections, including reference, bound journals, microforms, and (of course!) the main book stacks. Learn about the role of data in weeding local and consortial collections. This session will be helpful for libraries who are contemplating a large-scale weeding project and how Greenglass and/or local data can help.

Speakers
avatar for Dawn Mick

Dawn Mick

Access Services Department Head, Iowa State University
I am the head of the Access Services department at Iowa State University, which covers circulation, resource sharing, course reserves, and monograph (e- and print firm ordering) acquisitions. Previously, I served as head of Access Services at Missouri University of Science and Technology... Read More →
KR

Kimberley Robles Smith

Library - Collection Management, California State University - Fresno
avatar for David Tyckoson

David Tyckoson

Research Services Librarian, California State University, Fresno
David Tyckoson is a librarian at the Henry Madden Library at California State University, Fresno. He is first and foremost a reference librarian and has written and presented extensively on reference service and reference collections. He teaches RUSA’s online class on the Reference... Read More →



Wednesday November 7, 2018 11:30am - 12:10pm EST
Grand Ballroom 1, Gaillard Center

11:30am EST

Let the winds of change carry us forward: Measuring diversity and other multidisciplinary subjects in the collection
Do you know how well your library collection reflects the diversity of your student population, the disciplines in which they study, and their various perspectives? These were the questions asked by two academic librarians at Penn State University and Washington State University Vancouver. During literature searches, as they prepared to assess the collection coverage of materials relating to marginalized groups within the Penn State Libraries system and the Orbis Cascade Alliance Consortium, they discovered a disappointing lack of information on methods for assessing collections in subject specific and multidisciplinary subject areas. This session will provide an overview of two collections-based research projects, one of which focuses on LGBTQ collection materials and the other on collections related to racism and social justice as well as the methods they used to assess collection coverage in these areas.
This session will provide an overview of these collections-based research projects and the constellation of methods that were used in order to contribute to the conversation regarding collection assessment in academic libraries as well as stimulate conversation among attendees. 


Speakers
avatar for Sue Phelps

Sue Phelps

Health Sciences and Outreach Services Librarian, Washington State University Vancouver
JP

Julia Proctor

Collection Services and Strategies Librarian, Penn State University



11:30am EST

Measuring the scholarly impact of newspaper sources in research
While digitized news research databases have been available to researchers for nearly 20 years, measuring the value of this content on teaching and research outcomes remains a known challenge. Usage statistics may only convey part of the story. Increasingly, libraries want to know the value of such investments on research funding and on the quality and quantity of research outcomes.
Expanding upon a previous project quantifying the impacts of investment in humanities archives (Meyer, 2016; Meyer & Eccles, 2016, 2017) that looked at The New York Times in comparison to two digital collections: Early English Books Online and The House of Commons Parliamentary Papers, this project examines the scholarly uses of four leading newspaper titles: The Guardian, The Washington Post, The Wall Street Journal, and The New York Times.
What is the impact of digitized newspaper titles in research outcomes? The earlier study suggested that The New York Times-- when considered as a scholarly resource—had a much broader influence across disciplines than the other digital collections resources examined. What is the comparative impact of other newspaper titles across disciplines? Do the titles perform similarly across disciplines or are there significant differences?
In this presentation, we will share the methodology, outcomes and next steps from the research project, and make recommendations for those wishing to conduct similar impact studies at an individual institution level.

1. Meyer, Eric T. (2016). Quantifying the impacts of investment in humanities archives: Early English Books Online, House of Commons Parliamentary Papers, and The New York Times. Paper presented at the The Charleston Conference, Charleston, SC, USA.

2. Meyer, Eric T. and Eccles, Kathryn. (2017). From Engagement to Knowledge Machines: Understanding how digital resources are transforming knowledge. Paper presented at the 11th International Conference on Performance Measurement in Libraries, Oxford, UK.


Speakers
avatar for Eric T. Meyer

Eric T. Meyer

Dean | Mary R. Boyvey Chair for Excellence | Louis T. Yule Regents Professor, School of Information, U of Texas at Austin
Eric T. Meyer is Dean and the Mary R. Boyvey Chair and Louis T. Yule Regents Professor at the School of Information at the University of Texas at Austin. His research looks at the changing nature of knowledge creation in science, medicine, social science, arts, and humanities as technology... Read More →



Wednesday November 7, 2018 11:30am - 12:10pm EST
Laurens Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King St, Charleston, SC 29403, USA

11:30am EST

Meeting Customers & Users Where They Are
In today’s information landscape, libraries, publishers, and technology vendors are adopting proactive strategies to engage with customers and end-users in new ways. When addressing content discovery and access, we often discuss “meeting customers / users where they are” – but how do we know “where they are”? How are generational and cultural shifts changing the expectations of our customers and users? And, what does it look like when such a strategy is implemented? Is this purely a technological effort? Are we talking about totally new modes of librarianship, publishing, and software development? Are there implications for cross-sector collaboration? What can we learn from one another? How do we remain relevant to users when they have many competing options for information discovery and access? What's the relationship between what users do and what they say they want? This panel will demonstrate what it means to drive anticipatory, customer-centric, and user-focused strategies for supporting academic and research endeavors.

Speakers
avatar for Scott Ahlberg

Scott Ahlberg

COO, Reprints Desk
Scott has decades of experience in content, document delivery, and startup businesses, starting with Dynamic Information (EbscoDoc) in the 1980s, and later as an executive at Infotrieve. He has served in various roles at Reprints Desk since 2006, providing his expertise in operational... Read More →
avatar for Stacey Burke

Stacey Burke

Senior Manager, Marketing & Communications, Science Publishing & Membership, American Society for Microbiology
As the Marketing & Communications Manager for Science Publishing at the American Society for Microbiology (ASM) leading the marketing programs for the society’s journals and books portfolio, institutional subscriptions and society membership. Through the employment of content marketing... Read More →
avatar for Bert Carelli

Bert Carelli

Director, Partnerships, TrendMD Inc.
* Publisher goals for increasing the audience for journals and other content.* Strategies for targeting key user communities* Increasing user engagement* Getting a better understanding of user behavior
avatar for Lettie Conrad

Lettie Conrad

Product Research & Development Affiliate, Maverick Publishing Specialists
I bring 15+ years publishing experience to my work with a variety of global information organizations and partners, dedicated to advancing knowledge and driving product innovations that ensure positive and effective researcher experiences. As a senior Maverick associate and independent... Read More →
avatar for Lisa Hinchliffe

Lisa Hinchliffe

Professor/Coordinator for Information Literacy Services and Instruction in the University Library, University of Illinois
avatar for Erika Valenti

Erika Valenti

President, Emerald Group Publishing



Wednesday November 7, 2018 11:30am - 12:10pm EST
Colonial Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel

11:30am EST

Nothing happens unless first a dream: Demystifying the academic library job search and acing the application process
Academic library positions are often highly desirable for new librarians and experienced librarians interested in transitioning into a different setting. Yet for both novice and experienced librarians alike, landing an interview for an academic librarian position can feel intimidating and overwhelming. Applicants may have no academic library experience, no coursework in relevant areas, and may be competing with a large pool of qualified candidates. When academic job openings ask for years of academic library experience and library school specializations suggest that the path you pick is the path you keep until retirement, it begins to feel as though finding a position in an academic library is an insurmountable endeavor. As three librarians who have successfully made the move into an academic setting, we can attest that though the way may be unclear, this goal is not impossible to achieve. In this session, attendees will learn about transitioning to an academic library from diverse backgrounds and hear lessons learned from three early-career librarians.

This session will provide attendees interested in the Up and Coming thread valuable behind-the-scenes insight into the academic hiring process. Session attendees will:

● Learn how to tailor their application materials to an academic position and why this is crucial for success
● Get a glimpse of some of the situations and expectations they are likely to encounter during the interview process and suggestions for handling them
● Leave with a greater understanding of some of the facets unique to the academic setting with which applicants might not be familiar (e.g., shared governance, highly specialized roles, and the tenure process)

The presenters will develop and share handouts, including a sample job description with application materials tailored to that position, and look forward to a lively discussion with session attendees. MLS students are encouraged to attend.

Speakers
WJ

Whitney Jordan

Acquisitions Librarian, Western Carolina University
avatar for Scottie Kapel

Scottie Kapel

Scholarly Communication Librarian, Western Carolina University
ES

Elizabeth Skene

Special and Digital Collections Librarian, Western Carolina University



Wednesday November 7, 2018 11:30am - 12:10pm EST
Magnolia Room, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401, USA

11:30am EST

Open Web Tools
Scholia is a new tool from Wikidata that allows users to gain insights from over 70,000,000 open scholarly citations aggregated from a number of sources and publishers.

My presentation will provide a live overview of Scholia and a number of other open web tools and research resources looking for trends, opportunities, use cases.

Attendees will leave with a large list of resources to demo on their own and share with colleagues.

Resources I will discuss include:

Open MINTED Corpus Builder
Decentralized Web Tools including Beaker Browser and DIRT Protocol
Get The Research (Launching Fall 2018)
Microsoft Academic
GDELT Summary
Peerus
WebRecorder.io

and others.


Speakers
avatar for Curtis Michelson

Curtis Michelson

Founder and Principal, Minds Alert, LLC
Organizational Strategy and Design
avatar for Gary Price

Gary Price

Founder/Editor, infoDOCKET and Consultant, Self
Gary Price is a librarian, writer, consultant, and frequent conference speaker based in the Washington D.C. metro area.  He is currently the Resource and Reference Center Director for GIJN and editor of infoDOCKET.com, a daily update of news and new research tools.He lives near Washington... Read More →



Wednesday November 7, 2018 11:30am - 12:10pm EST
Cooper Room, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

11:30am EST

Preparing the Way for our Linked Data Future: Making MARC the Best it can Be
Libraries’ transition to linked data and the Web is well under way. However, in order to make this transition, libraries must first wean themselves from their current means of data communication, MARC. MARC was a revolution in its day. It allowed data from library card catalogs to be encoded in machine-readable form, enabling the catalog cards to be reproducible on the computer screen and the data to be exchanged freely among libraries. It is a fifty-year-old technology, however, originally designed for magnetic tape-based computers, and now only understood by library systems. In addition, the MARC formats are semantically inexpressive and have isolated libraries from the development of the Web. But for all its downsides, MARC is still the predominant method of communication throughout our Vendor/Library community and the majority of the linked data libraries’ will find essential will need to be generated from their MARC holdings. In October of 2017, the Program for Cooperative Cataloging issued a report from the Task Group on URIs in MARC. The inclusion of URIs in MARC data will insure the cleanest and most efficient means of conversion to linked data.



The session will begin with a brief introduction about the importance of the transition to linked data and a summary of the objectives of the PCC URI task force. A panel of members from three vendors supplying this enhanced service (Backstage Library Works, Casalini Libri, and Proquest/Coutts) will explain their services and how they have responded to the PCC Task Group. Members of the audience can interact with the panel and ask about these services in relationship to their libraries. Members of the audience can expect to learn more about the transition to linked data and how to better prepare their MARC data for this inevitable transition.

Speakers
avatar for Richard Belanger

Richard Belanger

Senior Vice President, Head of ProQuest Books, ProQuest
Experience & BackgroundRich Belanger leads the ProQuest Books business unit. He’s responsible for creating products that simplify the acquisition and delivery of books to our 5,000+ global academic customers; transforming the ebook reading experience for students, faculty, and researchers... Read More →
avatar for Casey Cheney

Casey Cheney

Vice President of Automation Services, Backstage Library Works
avatar for Tiziana Possemato

Tiziana Possemato

Casalini CIO - @Cult Director, Casalini Libri & @Cult
avatar for Philip Schreur

Philip Schreur

Associate University Librarian for Technical and Access Services, Stanford University
Currently, I am most interested in the transition of traditional Technical Services workflows from MARC-based to linked data-based counterparts. I feel that we will be living in a hybrid environment (MARC/linked data) for quite some time and that we will need to carefully assess which... Read More →


11:30am EST

Strategic Restructuring: staffing collections for an evolving scholarly landscape
The core work of collection development and management has never been more complex. Added to the traditional decision making around the content itself are layers of strategic decisions around access, licensing, DRM and preservation. New and evolving business models have increased the choices for procurement. Issues of cost containment and sustainability, as well as pressures for more student space, have fueled the need for more in-depth collections analysis and assessment.

To effectively respond to these challenges, some academic libraries have engaged in restructuring to build strategic collections teams. We will discuss this work at three Canadian academic libraries who are each at a different stage in the process: the University of Alberta, University of Guelph and Western University. The evolution of the teams and the impact on workflows, capacity building and decision making will be described.

The University of Guelph Library reorganized from a liaison librarian model to a strategic team based model in 2009, resulting in the creation of the Information Resources Strategic Team which has undergone further iterations since that time.

In 2014, the University of Alberta Libraries moved from a decentralized model of monograph acquisitions that involved all liaison librarians, to a centralized model that eliminated individual selection. In 2016 this model further evolved with the formation of a centralized team of collection strategies librarians who are responsible for all aspects of collections work, allowing liaisons to focus on other emerging service areas.

Western Libraries more recently shifted to a ‘functional’ or team based model. Following three years of planning, the libraries moved to a hybrid approach, helping to better accommodate the professional libraries and archives. Tangible, first steps will be discussed.

The presentation will wrap up with the common themes, lessons learned and next steps drawn from the experiences at our three libraries.

Speakers
avatar for Samuel Cassady

Samuel Cassady

Head, Collections and Content Strategies, Western University
avatar for Pamela Jacobs

Pamela Jacobs

Associate Librarian, McLaughlin Library, University of Guelph
avatar for Denise Koufogiannakis

Denise Koufogiannakis

Associate University Librarian, University of Alberta Libraries



11:30am EST

The New ORCID US Community Blooms: Working Together for Positive Change
ORCID (Open Researcher and Contributor ID) is an is an open, non-profit, community-driven initiative to create and maintain a global registry of unique identifiers for individual researchers. ORCID provides a framework for trustworthy identity management by linking research contributions and related activities across the scholarly communication ecosystem, with benefits for both individuals and organizations such as research institutions, publishers, government agencies, and funders. Individuals can obtain a unique ORCID iD for free, which serves as a digital identifier distinguishing individual researchers from other researchers and enabling them to manage their records. To reap the full benefits of ORCID, organizations need to become ORCID members and integrate ORCID into digital platforms and workflows to reduce administrative burden and connect ORCID iD records with institutional repositories, publishing platforms, identity management systems, grant applications, and more.

In January 2018, four US consortia (GWLA, NERL, BTAA, and LYRASIS), came together to form the ORCID US Community, providing premium consortium ORCID membership for institutions at a highly discounted rate, as well as dedicated technical and community support for members. With over 95 institutional members currently taking advantage of this national consortial approach to ORCID in the US, and increasing adoption of ORCID by publishers, funders, and other organizations worldwide, we are at the cusp of a paradigm shift from repetitive print-based workflows to fully harnessing the power and advantages of the digital age in the research and scholarly communication landscape. This presentation will cover the basics and benefits of ORCID for both individuals and organizations, as well as the benefits of institutional ORCID membership via the ORCID US Community. Attendees will learn about best practices, strategies, and recommended resources for working with ORCID, with time for discussion and Q&A.

Speakers
avatar for Jill Grogg

Jill Grogg

Strategist, Content & Schol Comm Initiatives, LYRASIS
Jill Grogg is a Strategist with the Content & Scholarly Communication Initiatives team at LYRASIS. Previously, she was electronic resources coorindator at The University of Alabama Libraries for over a decade.
avatar for Sheila Rabun

Sheila Rabun

ORCID US Community Specialist, ORCID US Community
The leader of the ORCID US Community is working with almost 150 partners across the United States to integrate ORCIDs into their systems. ESIP joined this Community this year so Shelia will help us understand the benefits of our membership and about the future of ORCID. ... Read More →



11:30am EST

What Makes Us Do It? The Legalities and Demand that Necessitates a Library Video Streaming Service
There are many differing interpretations of copyright law when it comes to digitizing and providing streaming video as a library service. Librarians at the University of Kansas (KU) have long been interested in providing a streaming video service for pedagogical purposes, but KU General Counsel always took a conservative stance on this practice and would not allow it. When KU Libraries hired a new Dean, who was also a copyright attorney, General Counsel became amenable to the Fair Use arguments the Dean provided, and after working through workflow and technical issues, a new streaming service was introduced to KU faculty and students.

Growing demand for streaming content along with the diminishing availability of playback equipment in the classroom for VHS and DVDs were primary motivators in the establishment of this service. Preference for streaming content for classroom use mirrors the greater trend for streaming content and the downward trend for physical media in the marketplace, as well as the increased usage of video for classroom instruction and research. This service not only serves to meet faculty and student expectations for access, it allows for greater accommodation of online and distance education. In this session, KU Librarians will survey the policies at selected academic libraries for providing access to streaming video and discuss the various interpretations of copyright law and Fair Use, including the interpretation of Fair Use that allows the KU Libraries to provide a streaming service. The discussion will also include an examination of the rationale and the technological environment at KU that necessitates such a service, along with the workflow planning and troubleshooting involved in bringing this new service to life.

Speakers
avatar for Lea Currie

Lea Currie

Head of Content Development, University of Kansas Libraries
Lea Currie has been the head of Content Development at the University of Kansas Libraries since 2008 and employed with the Libraries in other positions since 1999. Lea’s principal role in her current position is to manage the collection development budget, review and analyze collections... Read More →
avatar for Corinne Forstot-Burke

Corinne Forstot-Burke

Performing Arts and Humanities Librarian, University of Kansas Libraries



Wednesday November 7, 2018 11:30am - 12:10pm EST
Salon II, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401, USA

11:30am EST

Where the Stress Falls: Exploring Challenges in the University Library-University Press Relationship
More than 30% of members of the Association of University Presses (AUPresses) report to their university libraries. While there has been significant discussion of the benefits of press-library integration and collaboration, less time has been given to exploring areas of tension that can emerge when presses report to libraries. Do stresses appear around budgeting/funding, missions, project management, staffing, open access, and more? What cultural and professional differences can frustrate the creation of strong partnerships? What seams can break when presses and libraries try to address new challenges, even when they’ve been in an established relationship for years? Finally, what strategies can be deployed for avoiding or resolving conflicts, all with the goal of promoting true collaboration and a sustainable scholarly communications landscape?

Organized by the AUPress’s library relations committee, this panel features three directors of university presses that report to university libraries, as well as a university librarian whose remit includes the university press. Each panelist will bring a different perspective to the discussion, as well as different reasons as to why and when their press moved into the library. This session will be of benefit to library administrators, librarians working in scholarly communications and publishing, and university press staff who want to better understand the realities and challenges of press-library integration. The session will focus on strategies for building positive relationships across professional boundaries, with time for attendees to participate in a discussion about how librarians and publishers can work together in support of our authors, readers, and scholarly communities.

Speakers
avatar for Geoffrey Robert Little

Geoffrey Robert Little

Editor-in-Chief, Concordia University Press
avatar for Lisa Quinn

Lisa Quinn

Director, Wilfrid Laurier University Press
avatar for Liz Scarpelli

Liz Scarpelli

Director, University of Cincinnati Press & Library Publishing Services
avatar for Carolyn Walters

Carolyn Walters

Ruth Lilly Dean of University Libraries, Indiana University
Carolyn Walters is the Ruth Lilly Dean of University Libraries at Indiana University, and co-director of the $27 million Media Digitization & Preservation Initiative (MDPI), IU’s ambitious work to protect the university’s rich repositories of audio, video, and film through digital... Read More →


Wednesday November 7, 2018 11:30am - 12:10pm EST
Salon I, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401, USA

11:30am EST

Stopwatch Session
These short “pecha kucha-like” sessions will feature four PowerPoint presentations of 6 minutes and 40 seconds each. We will have time at the end of the session intended for Q&A for all presenters. Come for a lively, rapid-fire group of talks.

1) French eBooks (Claude Potts, University of California Berkeley)
France’s publishing industry is among the most robust in all of Europe. French remains one of the most important languages for scholarship, and thus publications in all formats continue to be acquired by North American research libraries across the disciplines. Despite the efforts of both public and private ventures such as Cairn, Casalini Libri, Classiques Garnier Numérique, Harmathèque, OpenEdition – some of the leaders who have developed platforms and purchase models for academic libraries, French language ebooks remain little used compared to print. Even after they’ve been purchased and added to discovery systems, an analysis of usage patterns shows that researchers at UC Berkeley are checking out the physical books when the digital surrogate sits on the proverbial book shelf gathering virtual dust.
This presentation posits that it is not the language in which the books are published that acts as a barrier to access but the paucity of the metadata for these digital works. Though this problem is not unique to French publications from Europe, it is endemic to many digital monographs from the non-English speaking world, thereby marginalizing valuable scholarly content. The critique comes at a time when controlled vocabulary and Library of Congress Subject Headings are being passed over in favor of more easily obtainable descriptive metadata such as publisher-supplied summaries, table of contents, and user-supplied tags. Is there a role for libraries to ensure that ebooks in non-English languages are discoverable? If so, what role should vendors and regional/national consortia play?

2) Forming Cooperative Relationships for Collections: A Winding Road of Map Stewardship (Barbara Ferry, Smithsonian Libraries)
In 2017, the Smithsonian Libraries became aware of large collections of maps housed in various locations at the Smithsonian, as well as two dedicated volunteers working since 2006 to catalog and digitize more than 35,000 maps. The volunteers were losing their sponsor, and the Libraries stepped in to provide space and oversight of the project while the disposition of the collection came under review. Working with the Smithsonian Archives and the National Museum of Natural History, we obtained grant funding to house the most vulnerable annotated maps, as well as to plan for collections care. We also tackled important issues including copyright and U.S. classification of the maps. As more Smithsonian museums and units have learned about the project, the number of maps in the project continues to grow, while we navigate the evolving stewardship of the collection.

3) Streaming Video PDA: Brace Yourself, Usage is Coming (Marianne Foley, SUNY Buffalo State College)
Low usage statistics for library resources are a big concern at SUNY Buffalo State College library, so we were unprepared for the popularity of a new streaming video PDA program. Though it was slow to take off, when it did, usage increased rapidly. After depleting the initial budget for the resource, we allocated more funds and then quickly depleted those additional funds. At that point, we changed to a mediated model to help control the costs but that greatly increased work for our Acquisitions Department and raised collection development questions we had not considered when we began the PDA program. To continue to offer a streaming video PDA program, we reviewed various models and controls before deciding on an approach that we hope will give users good options, curtail costs, and minimize workloads.
We will provide a quick summary of our program’s explosive growth, what we did to control costs, the unforeseen consequences, and how we tried to enhance the experience for everyone. We’ll conclude with the current state of video streaming PDA at our library. This session will provide practical information for small to mid-sized academic libraries that have recently begun or are contemplating streaming video PDA.

4) Creativity, Community, and Entrepreneurship: Empowering users with library resources, services, and space (Beth Marhanka, Georgetown University)
The mission of the library is to empower people to solve problems and create new knowledge. In today's world, this charge includes democratizing access to the resources our communities need to be productive.  Libraries need to keep evolving to stay relevant and providing access to digital media and creative production tools enables users to stay intellectually engaged in today’s world, to launch new businesses, and to communicate important ideas more effectively.

Moderators
RH

Robert Hollandsworth

Economics, Finance & PRTM Librarian, Learning Commons Coordinator, Clemson University

Speakers
avatar for Barbara Ferry

Barbara Ferry

Head, Natural and Physical Sciences Libraries, Smithsonian Libraries
As Head, Natural & Physical Sciences Libraries at the Smithsonian, I lead a team of 18 staff serving the information needs of scientists and educators. Library staff work at branches located in Washington DC, Edgewater Maryland, Front Royal Virginia, and Panama.
MF

Marianne Foley

Head, Acquisitions and Library Systems, SUNY Buffalo State College
avatar for Beth Marhanka

Beth Marhanka

Interim Associate University Librarian, Georgetown University Library
My passion is pushing the boundaries of library services by making emerging technologies and state-of-the-art tools more accessible to anyone with a desire to innovate, create new knowledge and improve teaching and learning in higher education.Talk to me about makerspaces, VR/AR... Read More →
avatar for Claude Potts

Claude Potts

Librarian for Romance Language Collections, University of California, Berkeley



Wednesday November 7, 2018 11:30am - 12:10pm EST
Pinckney Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

12:10pm EST

Lunch On Your Own
Wednesday November 7, 2018 12:10pm - 1:00pm EST
TBA

12:30pm EST

EBSCO Luncheon at Charleston Conference
RSVP Required
Sponsored by EBSCO


Please join EBSCO for lunch at Charleston Conference 2018. Join us to hear updates on the latest EBSCO products, features and services while enjoying a meal with fellow librarians!

Sponsors
avatar for EBSCO

EBSCO

EBSCO provides search tools, research content and subscription management services through EBSCO Discovery Service™, hundreds of research databases, e-journals and books.


Wednesday November 7, 2018 12:30pm - 2:00pm EST
39 Rue de Jean

12:30pm EST

This Is the Future That Libraries Want
Luncheon Sponsored by Ex Libris. RSVP Requested  

In a recent survey, academic librarians were asked to share their thoughts on the future of library technology, culminating with the question, “How do you envision your library ten years from now?” More than 150 librarians from around the world responded, and survey results show that the future libraries want is already here with tools and approaches including artificial intelligence, augmented reality, voice recognition, virtual reality, 3D printing, gamified experiences, embedded librarianship, living labs and more. When creating new library services through the use of next-gen technology, it is as essential as ever for librarians to collaborate with the user community to understand the technologies and workflows already in place, motivators for change, and barriers to access new projects or initiatives. Margaret Briand Wolfe, Systems Librarian at Boston College shares insights from the community survey regarding the technologies used by libraries today, their current challenges, and plans for the future. The presentation will include updates on the newly developed tools and roadmap functionality that harness artificial intelligence to make intelligent, action-oriented recommendations, as well as plans for system advancements at Boston College.

Speakers
avatar for Andrew French

Andrew French

Director of Sales Operations, Ex Libris
avatar for Margaret Briand Wolfe

Margaret Briand Wolfe

Systems Librarian, Boston College
Boston College was a development partner with Ex Libris for Alma and was the first institution to go live with Alma in July 2012. As a systems librarian at Boston College my primary responsibility is Alma. I also work in Alma Analytics and with the Alma APIs. Feel free to ask me anything... Read More →

Sponsors
avatar for ProQuest and Ex Libris

ProQuest and Ex Libris

ProQuest is committed to supporting the important work happening in the world’s research and learning communities. The company curates content that matters to the advancement of knowledge, assembling an archive of billions of vetted, indexed documents. It simplifies workflows so... Read More →



Wednesday November 7, 2018 12:30pm - 2:00pm EST
Colonial Ballroom, Embassy Suites

1:00pm EST

A Joint Roadmap for Open Science/Scholarly Tools: Collaborating to Support Open Infrastructure
Organizations building nonprofit, open-source tools for scholarship and publication have joined with open-science researchers in a new collaboration to develop a Joint Roadmap for Open Science Tools.

While open technologies and services are becoming essential in science practices, so far, there has been no holistic effort to align these tools into a coherent ecosystem that can support the scientific experience of the future. To draw this missing map, we’ve formed the Joint Roadmap as an informal group of like-minded people and organizations with shared goals. To date, a number of organizations are participating, including: Berkeley Institute of Data Science (BIDS), bioRxiv, Collaborative Knowledge Foundation (Coko), Crossref, Dat Project, Earth and Space Science Open Archive (EESOAr), eLife, Hypothesis, Jupyter Project, Mozilla, Open Science Framework (OSF), ORCID, Public Knowledge Project, Public Library of Science (PLOS), Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition (SPARC), Wikimedia, and Zotero, and researchers: Lisa Hinchliffe, Samantha Hindle, and Daniel Mietchen.

Speakers
avatar for Lisa Hinchliffe

Lisa Hinchliffe

Professor/Coordinator for Information Literacy Services and Instruction in the University Library, University of Illinois
avatar for Alison McGonagle-O'Connell

Alison McGonagle-O'Connell

Director of Community Development, Collaborative Knowledge Foundation
Open source workflow tools to support the submission, peer review, and production workflow for research outputs in the forms of books, journals, and micropublications. Topics related to peer review in general. Topics around contributorship and attribution. Diversity and inclusion... Read More →
TR

Travis Rich

PubPub Project Lead, The Knowledge Futures Group, MIT
avatar for Michael D. Roy

Michael D. Roy

Dean of the Library, Middlebury College
I'm interested in talking with people at this conference about the intersections of librarianship, academic technology, open access publishing, digital scholarship, and how all of these inform 21st century visions of digital learning, and emerging forms of literacy.
avatar for Dan Whaley

Dan Whaley

CEO and Founder, Hypothesis
Dan is a coder and entrepreneur that created the first online travel reservation company on the web (ITN/GetThere) in 1995. He wrote much of the software, launched the business and guided the long term technical and product vision. GetThere went public in 1999 and was sold to Sabre... Read More →


1:00pm EST

Academic Libraries and Curriculum Collection Development
Academic libraries in the US/Canada are increasingly called on to directly support curriculum objectives through organization of open educational resource (OER) efforts and collection of other course materials - all in an effort to ease the problems associated with textbook costs for students in higher education settings. This session will include a status update on academic library collection development for curriculum materials and a report on analysis of a large scale data set of electronic textbook use worldwide and also specifically in the US/Canada. Trends in curriculum collecting by subject area and copyright year will be paired with analysis of institutional practices by geography and institution size. Case studies involving best practices on campuses making high use of open and licensed electronic curriculum materials will be included. Special attention will be paid to non-traditional curriculum materials such as books not labeled as textbooks and materials used in smaller classes. Challenges such as acceptance of electronic texts for classroom use and limitations on electronic textbook availability will also be discussed.

Speakers
avatar for Beth Bernhardt

Beth Bernhardt

Consortia Account Manager, Oxford University Press/ Previously at UNC Greensboro
Beth works for Oxford University Press as a Consortia Account Manager. Before coming to OUP she was the Assistant Dean for Collection Management and Scholarly Communications at UNC Greensboro. Beth has served as the Principle Program Director for the Charleston Conference since... Read More →
avatar for Robert Wainwright Boissy

Robert Wainwright Boissy

Account Development Director, Springer Nature
I have had various roles in scholarly publishing since 2003, and fifteen years as a subscription agent before that. I have library degrees from the University at Albany and Syracuse University. I like to talk about cooperative marketing projects between libraries and publishers... Read More →
avatar for Michael Levine-Clark

Michael Levine-Clark

Dean, University of Denver Libraries



Wednesday November 7, 2018 1:00pm - 2:15pm EST
Grand Ballroom 2, Gaillard Center

1:00pm EST

Academic Libraries: How do they put it all together, become agile, and adapt?
"Collaboration zones, content production, data curation, digital humanities, digital literacy, emerging technologies, open publishing, repositories, research information management, and more — what’s a library director to do? Quick answer: Its all about leadership. Academic libraries and their leaders are challenged more than ever to be increasingly relevant to their communities, which is dominated by digital organizations, culture, and technology.


The speaker, a dean of a major academic library, will discuss strategies for moving libraries toward a new core of programs that enhance teaching, learning, and research. He will discuss new perspectives on librarianship as well as working with tools such as finances, human resources, your organization’s existing culture and values, technology, college and university policy, and more to generate your library’s agility. A lively conversation with the speaker and audience members is encouraged. "

Speakers
TW

Tyler Walters

Dean, University Libraries, Virginia Tech


Wednesday November 7, 2018 1:00pm - 2:15pm EST
Colonial Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel

1:00pm EST

Authentication, Identity Management, Privacy and Personalisation: How can libraries strike the right balance and avoid the growing dystopian dangers?
Personal data on the internet is increasingly owned by the world’s five largest corporations, creating the potential for immense disparities of power.  Artificial Intelligence is being deployed to track ever more aspects of our lives.  Privacy advocates are warning of our rapid descent toward a dystopian society, using terms like ‘Surveillance Capitalism’ and ‘Digital Feudalism’ to describe this growing imbalance of power.

The dangers of privacy invasion are real, and libraries have been rightly cautious in their approach to authentication within their walls. While various Single Sign-On authentication protocols have emerged, there is still a great deal of resistance by libraries to adopt any form of authentication beyond IP.  From the USA PATRIOT Act to electronic resource license agreements, librarians are familiar with the fact that many policies, contracts, and laws impact the way patrons’ privacy is protected within their walls. However, there is little understanding of the ways in which these various contracts, laws, and policies intersect with and/or hinder one another.

Yet, the internet is increasingly delivering valuable personalized tools and experiences that are changing user expectations and demands.  If we in the library community do not proactively establish common authentication methods that strike the right balance between privacy and personalization, it may happen to us and possibly by powers who do not have our patrons’ privacy interests at heart.

This session will present a robust, multi-dimensional discussion and debate about the challenges and opportunities libraries face today around privacy and authentication, including an in-depth expose´of the intersection and interplay of various contracts, laws, policies and agreements within the library.  We’ll hear views from libraries on opposing sides of the spectrum and a representative from JISC will provide a comparative view of the approach taken and protocols adopted in the UK.

Speakers
avatar for Steven Harris

Steven Harris

Assistant Dean of Libraries, University of Nevada, Reno
Steven is Assistant Dean of Libraries at the University of Nevada, Reno. He is the administrative manager for collections, acquisitions, cataloging and metadata, discovery services (technical services), digital initiatives, and library IT.
JH

Josh Howlett

Head of Trust and Identity, JISC
avatar for Kari Paulson

Kari Paulson

VP - Market Development, Books, ProQuest
avatar for Molly Rainard

Molly Rainard

Subscription & Purchasing Manager, Auraria Library
avatar for Heather Shipman

Heather Shipman

E-Resource Specialist, Cornell University
Heather Shipman is Cornell University Library’s ebook acquisitions and management specialist, coordinator for the ebook ordering team, and a member of the e-resources troubleshooting teams. She tends to stick her nose into everything to see how it works - which almost always results... Read More →


Wednesday November 7, 2018 1:00pm - 2:15pm EST
Gold Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel

1:00pm EST

Beyond Circulation: Assessing Collections in the Age of Student Success
In a time of decreasing collections budgets and expectations of increased fiscal accountability in libraries, collection management librarians are increasingly expected to justify expenditures through the provision of usage data to their stakeholders. Yet traditional methods of collection assessment, often focused upon summary circulation statistics, are only marginally useful in demonstrating collection strength to patrons. To paint a more complete picture of a library's successful collection development program, librarians need to identify and verify a relationship between circulation statistics and improved student outcomes, as well as support of faculty scholarship and teaching. While this task can seem daunting, many methods not involving the use of advanced statistics or an inordinate amount of time and effort do exist. This presentation will: a) provide a brief review of the literature of collection assessment as it relates to patron success; and b) review several methods of collection assessment beyond basic circulation counts, including analysis of circulation and interlibrary loan activity, citation analysis of patron scholarship, and circulation statistics as they relate to such student success measures as GPA, with practical examples of such analysis from a small university library. Session attendees will be given a template for developing or enhancing their own assessment plans, and time will be provided for small group discussions to identify first steps and potential obstacles.

LINK TO PRESENTATION LIBGUIDE:  https://cnu.libguides.com/assessingcollections

Speakers
AW

Alicia Willson-Metzger

Collection Management Librarian, Christopher Newport University
Alicia Willson-Metzger is the Collection Management Librarian at Christopher Newport University, a liberal arts university located in Newport News, VA. Her professional interests include collection management and assessment.



1:00pm EST

Bringing new scholarly communications librarians into bloom.
"What do scholarly communication librarians need to know about publishing? Do you need a JD to lead a library copyright program? Is research data management too big a job for any one person? Scholarly communication is recognized as a core competency for librarianship but there is currently no unified educational resource available for training and continuing education that represents the great diversity of experience and perspectives at place in effective support for scholarly communication.

This lively discussion asks librarians, publishers, vendors and other interested information professionals to weigh in on a community conversation about what scholarly communication is and what training a librarian should have to do the job. We’ll prime the discussion with findings from our IMLS-funded (LG-72-17-0132-17), study on this interdisciplinary and quickly evolving field. Then we’ll dig into these questions, with an eye to incorporating your ideas into an open educational resource (OER) for teaching library students and professionals about scholarly communication. Join the conversation about what kind of librarians we should be growing and what they need to blossom!
"

Speakers
avatar for Josh Bolick

Josh Bolick

Scholarly Communications Librarian, University of Kansas
I support open access, author's rights, copyright & fair use, and open education programming at the University of Kansas. I'm a presenter for the Open Textbook Network and an OER Research Fellow with the Open Education Group. Ask me about the IMLS Grant I'm pursuing with Will Cross... Read More →
avatar for Maria Bonn

Maria Bonn

Senior Lecturer, School of Information Sciences, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign
Maria Bonn is a senior lecturer at the Graduate School of Library and Information Science at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign as asenior lecturer. She teaches courses on the role of libraries in scholarly communication and publishing. Prior to her teaching appointment... Read More →
avatar for Will Cross

Will Cross

Director, Copyright and Digital Scholarship Center, NC State University Libraries
I'm excited about the relationship between copyright, student agency, and open culture. Recently I've been focused on the Library Copyright Institute, the Open Pedagogy Incubator, the Scholarly Communication Notebook, and the Best Practices for Fair Use in Open Education... Read More →


Wednesday November 7, 2018 1:00pm - 2:15pm EST
Salon II, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401, USA

1:00pm EST

Collective Action: Community Approaches in Scholarly Communication
"Community and scholarly communication are intertwined by design. Researcher careers, research institutions, and global collaborations progress based on the communication of ideas. Cultivating change in this space involves navigating the cultural norms of inter- and intra-disciplinary groups, funders, publishers, and infrastructure. Mobilizing communities capable of supporting this work is a daunting task. Determining who your community is, how to create a sense of belonging among them, and the ways that they will work together are interrelated challenges that all community initiatives in scholarly communication must face.

This Lively Discussion will feature five individuals with experience working on a range of projects that have taken unique approaches to working with their communities. From coordinating a network of data science instructors to advocating for improved technical infrastructure in scholarly communication, each participant has faced different challenges and surfaced new opportunities. On their journey through the community experiences of The Carpentries, Metadata2020, C4DISC, ORCID, CHORUS, the Open Scholarship Initiative, and more, the Lively discussion attendees will see similarities and connections among the projects emerge, and will be encouraged to share their own experiences, success stories, and challenges. Collectively, the participants in the session will begin to map the many ways that community approaches in scholarly communication are similar and can build upon one another, as well as how and why paths may diverge.

----
Chris Erdmann is the Library Carpentry Community and Development Director, and he works with the community of nearly 2,000 Carpentries instructors that are dedicated to the proliferation of data science skills among researchers. He coordinates workshops globally, and develops the community infrastructure that will facilitate growth.

Alice Meadows is the Director of Community Engagement and Support at ORCID. Alice develops and implements the ORCID communications plan and leads the support services team. Her primary role is to broaden awareness of the organization and its services and programs, and to support adoption by key stakeholders and audiences. She also works with a number of community initiatives in scholarly communication, including Metadata 2020, the recently established C4DISC (Coalition for Diversity and Inclusion in Scholarly Communications), and a soon-to-be-launched, cross-community campaign for wider adoption and use of persistent identifiers.

T. Scott Plutchak, now retired from the University of Alabama at Birmingham, leads the “Defining the Terms we use about Metadata” project of the Metadata2020 initiative. He is also founding member of the Chicago Collaborative, a group dedicated to finding common ground among the librarian, publisher and editorial communities, and the Chair of the steering committee for the Open Scholarship Initiative, a UNESCO-sponsored global convention featuring all stakeholders in scholarly communication.

Howard Ratner, Executive Director of CHORUS, a community-led organization that leverages existing infrastructure to enable sustainable, cost-effective, and transparent open access to content reporting on funded research. Howard also helped launch Crossref, ORCID, and CLOCKSS, all community-led scholarly publishing organizations that are now well established.

(Moderator) Lou Woodley serves as the Director of Community Engagement for Trellis, an online community platform developed by the American Association for the Advancement of Science. She is also the Program Director for the AAAS Community Engagement Fellows Program, which launched in January 2017. The aim of the program is to train and support scientific community managers"

Speakers
avatar for Chris Erdmann

Chris Erdmann

Library Carpentry Community & Development Director, The Carpentries
avatar for Alice Meadows

Alice Meadows

Director, Communications, ORCID
 
avatar for T. Scott Plutchak

T. Scott Plutchak

Librarian, Epistemologist, UAB (retired)
In 2017 T. Scott Plutchak retired from his position as Director of Digital Data Curation Strategies at the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB).  From 1995 to 2014 he was the Director of UAB’s Lister Hill Library of the Health Sciences.  Prior to that he was Associate Director... Read More →
avatar for Howard Ratner

Howard Ratner

Executive Director, CHORUS
Howard is the Executive Director of CHORUS. Over the past two decades, he played a key role in developing innovative technology solutions that have transformed scholarly communications. He co-founded and chaired ORCID – Open Researcher and Contributor ID system, and was active... Read More →
avatar for Lou Woodley

Lou Woodley

Director of Community Engagement for Trellis, Director of Community Engagement Fellowship Program., American Association for the Advancement of Science
Lou is the Community Engagement Director for Trellis, the new online communication and collaboration platform being developed by AAAS. Lou is a trained molecular biologist with research experience at Cambridge University, the European Molecular Biology Laboratory in Heidelberg, and... Read More →



Wednesday November 7, 2018 1:00pm - 2:15pm EST
Grand Ballroom 1, Gaillard Center

1:00pm EST

Dangerous liaisons: brainstorming the 21st century academic liaison
Academic liaison roles have seen massive growth to an ever-broadening range of duties. Through participation in focused live polls and real-time display of responses, the captured trends and insights shared actionable ideas which participants could then bring back to their home institutions.

Beginnings: Early traditions were rooted in the subject bibliographer whose expertise was focused on library collection development. Whether individually or in collaboration with academic departments, the academic liaison, subject specialist, or subject bibliographer concentrated on selection and handoff of the purchase to the library’s acquisitions functions.

Task creep: The growth in the breadth and range of library services has greatly widened the range of academic liaisons’ duties. In addition to collection management informed by subject knowledge, the academic liaison’s close collaboration with academic departments now includes subject-focused information literacy, course-embedded research support, one-on-one research consultations, production of online research guides, advising faculty and students on quality publications and copyrights, research data support, digital scholarship, open educational resources, assessment, analytics and decision support, and more. Academic liaisons thereby feel the pull of subject expertise as well as functional expertise.

About this session: Session participants brainstormed on areas of liaison serves that work well for them, areas of difficulty, training needs, job functions to add and drop, ideas for solutions, and must-have competencies for library liaisons.

SESSION STRUCTURE:

Part 1 -- Background: In Part 1, this participative session kicked off with an introduction of patterns and trends identified by ARL and ASERL studies and discussions in a recent ASERL institute.

Part 2 -- Interactive exercises:
  • 1. Job description exercise: Session participants examined current job postings for descriptions of liaison roles. Guided by interactive live polls, the participants identified key liaison functions missing from the descriptions. Next, the participants noted superfluous functions which pose distractions from liaison roles.
  • 2. Reflection exercise: Guided by interactive live polls, the session's participants reflected upon the following:
  • .         + core competencies for liaisons,
  • .         + aspects that work well in their home institutions' liaison programs,
  • .         + their liaison institutions' pain points,
  • .         + types of support needed for their liaison roles,
  • .         + ways in which administrators can help library liaisons, and
  • .         + key takeaways and ideas from this sessions that participants will try in their home institutions.
Part 3: additional readings of current liaison research.
Interactive live poll results are included in the slides posted here, the paper for the Charleston Conference Proceedings, and at https://works.bepress.com/antjemays.

Speakers
avatar for Antje Mays

Antje Mays

Director of Collections, University of Kentucky Libraries
Antje Mays, Director of Collections at University of Kentucky Libraries, leads collection management efforts in support of the University's growing academic programs and research activities. An experienced linguist, translator, and interpreter, she also serves as academic liaison... Read More →



Wednesday November 7, 2018 1:00pm - 2:15pm EST
Calhoun Room, Francis Marion Hotel

1:00pm EST

Expand Your Online Presence: Promote Your Scholarly activities with Author Services
"Academic librarians are well known for training and teaching students how to navigate research databases and other electronic resources in information literacy programs and one-shot information literacy training sessions. However, students are not the only constituent at our institutions who require training in the research process. We are directors of the library and learning center (LLC) and institutional research and training (IRT) at an institution that is primarily a teaching-focused college. For many years, our faculty had no formal expectations of consistent publishing. This changed recently when college leadership announced that the new vision of the college included consistent faculty scholarly output.

To encourage faculty publication, we have worked one-on-on and in small group training on topics such as survey design, data analysis, and how to write literature reviews. Recently we co-facilitated a workshop on how to promote their publications using web-based Author Services. This training walked faculty on the various types of author services, including Google Scholar Author Profile, figshare, ImpactStory, ORCID, among others.

Join us in this lively presentation (no PowerPoint here!) with your laptops or mobile devices and your most updated CV or resume as we walk you through the process of setting up author services to promote your scholarly activities."

Speakers
avatar for Russell Michalak

Russell Michalak

Director (Library, Archives, & Learning Center), Goldey-Beacom College
Russell Michalak, MLIS, joined Goldey-Beacom College (GBC) in 2010. As Director of Library & Learning Center/Assistant Professor, he oversees all operations of the library including the annual budget. In addition, he supervises and hires librarians, tutors, paraprofessionals, as well... Read More →
avatar for Monica Rysavy

Monica Rysavy

Director & Assistant Professor, Office of Institutional Research & Training, Goldey-Beacom College
Monica D.T. Rysavy, Ph.D. is the Director of Institutional Research and Training for Goldey-Beacom College in Wilmington, Delaware. In this role she leads all institutional research and data analysis projects for the College. Her office provides faculty and staff training support... Read More →


Wednesday November 7, 2018 1:00pm - 2:15pm EST
Pinckney Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

1:00pm EST

Gatekeeper or Navigator? An Outsider's Take on Librarian Approach
In the day of instantaneous information access, can a gatekeeper truly control access to information or do they simply alienate the people they serve? If a librarian sees themselves as a navigator through the murky, confusing and overwhelming information available, are they more relatable to their patrons? Which model serves the library better? Do the libraries and library patrons of the future need gatekeepers, navigators, or something else?

How does a librarian’s thoughts on their role shape their approach? Do patrons respond better to a particular methodology?

This proposed Lively Discussion will look at how librarians approach their occupation and how that shapes librarian-patron relationship.

I would love to hear from industry professionals how they see librarian roles and if they feel libraries are currently being well served by these roles. As a new library employee with a new perspective, I hope that my stance that today’s and tomorrow’s libraries need to retire the gatekeeper mentality and embrace the navigator inside themselves will be helpful and encourage insightful discussion of how to think about librarianship.

Speakers
avatar for Heather Hankins

Heather Hankins

Digital Scholarship Specialist, Kennesaw State University


1:00pm EST

Good Partners? Can Open Access publishers and librarians find meaningful ways to collaborate?
What should the relationship be between the purely Open Access publishers and librarians?
Yes, in theory, among publishers these are publishers who are fully aligned with libraries to end the stranglehold which the traditional subscription publishers have on libraries. 
Yes, they are 100% attribution-only (CC-BY) publishers living up to the goals of Open Access (as described in the Budapest Open Access Initiative [BOAI]).

But, are they just replacing over-priced subscriptions with over-priced APCs (Article Processing Charges)?

Since they don't have renewal revenue at risk they may not pay sufficient attention to usage and integration with library systems [KBART?, COUNTER?, etc.].
Since collection development librarians don't have to assign budget dollars to purchasing their content--maybe they don't need attention from librarians.

The big subscription journals collect just one payment a year, and with big bundles, just one payment to cover thousands of journals.  Are Open Access publishers just replacing that with thousands of tiny payments either in article processing costs, or in membership schemes for individual researchers?  What are some initiatives that these publishers are trying that can avoid having the costs of publishing being invoiced to individual authors?

Can these publishers, aligned as they are with libraries on the defects in the subscription system, be good partners with librarians in areas such as:
  • Open Science
  • Pre-print Servers
  • Integration with Open Repositories
  • Open Monograph publishing
  • O.E.R.
  • Library Publishing 
  • Conference hosting
Is there more that they can do to effectively integrate with Library systems and processes?

Come to a Lively Discussion with a panel of purely Open Access publishers and librarians to brainstorm these and other questions effecting how the pure Open Access publishers and librarians might collaborate more effectively.

Moderators
SW

Sarah Wipperman

Scholarly Communications & Digital Repository Librarian, University of Pennsylvania

Speakers
avatar for Tina Baich

Tina Baich

Senior Associate Dean, IUPUI University Library
Tina Baich is a Librarian at IUPUI University Library where she is Senior Associate Dean for Scholarly Communication & Content Strategies. Her portfolio includes the Center for Digital Scholarship, Resource Acquisition & Description, Resource Sharing & Delivery Services, and the Ruth... Read More →
avatar for Alistair Freeland

Alistair Freeland

COO, MDPI
Alistair is the Chief Operating Officer of MDPI. He also holds a degree in Performing Arts from the University of East Anglia, United Kingdom and an Executive MBA from the University of St. Gallen.
avatar for Regina Gong

Regina Gong

Open Educational Resources (OER) Project Manager & Manager of Technical Services and Systems, Lansing Community College
I'm a librarian and the OER Project Manager at Lansing Community College. I would love to talk to you about your OER projects and how it has impacted student learning and faculty's teaching in your campuses. I'm also one of the Open Education Group Research Fellow for 2017-2018 and... Read More →
avatar for Brian Hole

Brian Hole

CEO, Ubiquity Press


1:00pm EST

I Didn’t Know You Didn’t Know That: Access to Articles from 3 (or more) Perspectives
Session co-authored by Kristine Shrauger, Department Head, Interlibrary Loan & Document Delivery Services at University of Central Florida, who was unable to attend the conference.

 What do changeable aggregated database content, copyright restrictions on interlibrary loan, and the instructional needs of nursing faculty have in common? They’re all information related to journal articles that one of three University of Central Florida librarians understands well -- but the other two don’t even know what they don’t know. The three -- the Nursing Subject Liaison, the Head of Interlibrary Loan and Document Delivery, and the Electronic Resources Librarian -- realized that gaps in their knowledge was hampering their ability to resolve problems for their community’s benefit. Moreover, not knowing what the others didn’t know was causing the same discussions to occur repeatedly without resolution. Join a conversation between three colleagues from three departments who want to help each other gain a better, fuller understanding to enhance everyone’s effectiveness. And if you’re a publisher or vendor, we could sure use your voice in the conversation -- we know there’s a lot we don’t know from your side of the house, too.

Speakers
avatar for Tina Buck

Tina Buck

Electronic Resources Librarian, University of Central Florida
Serials and database access with some ILS/ERM, cataloging, and acquisitions mixed in. Outside work, I like to cook and bake bread.
AT

Andy Todd

UCF Connect Librarian & Subject Librarian for Nursing, University of Central Florida



Wednesday November 7, 2018 1:00pm - 2:15pm EST
Salon I, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401, USA

1:00pm EST

Intersectionality: How the Definition Has Evolved and How Libraries Can Support the Conversation
Link to SLIDES: http://bit.ly/intersectionality_libraries  

"What is intersectionality? Who does it apply to? What does it mean in today’s rapidly globalizing society? How can we make a difference through our jobs and actions? How can we help others learn about it?

The term intersectionality was coined by legal scholar Kimberlé Crenshaw in her 1989 essay, “Demarginalizing the Intersection of Race and Sex: A Black Feminist Critique of Antidiscrimination Doctrine, Feminist Theory and Antiracist Politics.” Intersectionality is defined as the way different forms of discrimination overlap, combine, and intersect, especially as it applies to marginalized groups. It generally refers to sexism, racism, and classism, but the meaning has evolved since it was introduced, encompassing sexual orientation, religion, age, disability (or differently abled, if you will), and even region (West vs. non-West, for example).

In this session, we will explore what intersectionality is, and who it affects. We will discuss how the term has changed over time to encompass a variety of overlapping discriminatory practices affecting marginalized groups. Our speakers will talk about how they have worked to educate others about discrimination through their own programs, teaching, and actions. They will cover areas, such as research methodology, critical information literacy, and how intersectionality has been applied to library science, specifically within scholarly conversations. We will also explore ways libraries can take part in the conversation by offering resources and programming that support research and inquiry. Audience participation and sharing of experience will be encouraged as a broad array of perspectives will spur dialogue and help foster ideas."

Link to SLIDES: http://bit.ly/intersectionality_libraries 


Speakers
avatar for Sara Howard

Sara Howard

Librarian for Gender & Sexuality Studies and Student Engagement, Princeton University
SL

Sharon Ladenson

Gender and Communication Studies Librarian, Michigan State University
avatar for Shawn(ta) Smith-Cruz

Shawn(ta) Smith-Cruz

Assistant Professor and Head of Reference at the Graduate Center Library, City University of New York
avatar for Philip Virta

Philip Virta

Senior Acquisitions Editor, Gale, a Cengage cpmpany
I've worked in the educational publishing industry for over 20 years and held various roles in marketing, sales, business development, product management, and new product development. I often have my head in the clouds building castles in the air, but frequently return to earth with... Read More →



1:00pm EST

Open Access, Open Research, and the future of the Big Deal
Open Access has been with us for years and continues to evolve. Open Research as a concept is also fluid and building momentum and will likely be the supporting structure of all academic research and scholarly communications in the (near) future. What does this mean for the big deal? Can an Open Research environment be driven purely by APC’s and what does the next generation of Open Research mean for publishers?

Join us for a panel to discuss these issues and how all the stakeholders in open research can grow together into a more open academic world.

Moderators
avatar for Adam Chesler

Adam Chesler

Director, Global Sales, AIP Publishing

Speakers
CB

Chris Bennett

Global Sales Director, Cambridge University Press
JC

Jennifer Chan

Scholarly Communication Librarian, UCLA Library
Jennifer is the Scholarly Communication Librarian at UCLA. She liaises with campus partners on the development of targeted outreach and programming that promote scholarly communication and open access, and develops open education strategies to further the campus mission of research... Read More →
avatar for Liz Ferguson

Liz Ferguson

Vice-President, Editorial Development, Wiley


Wednesday November 7, 2018 1:00pm - 2:15pm EST
Grand Ballroom 3, Gaillard Center

1:00pm EST

Popular Reading Collections in Academic Libraries - A Panel Discussion on Goals, Parameters, and Campus Reactions
As academic libraries seek to enrich and engage the “whole student” experience, they seek to intersect with cultural, recreational, and community endeavors to help develop smart, engaged citizens and leaders. Popular or recreational reading collections are just one of myriad ways that academic libraries contribute to these efforts. This panel discussion will feature perspectives from three libraries (one private medium sized university, one large public STEM-focused, one large public comprehensive university) and their take on the role of popular reading collection in academic libraries. The panelists will address opportunities and challenges of their popular reading collection as well as collection/acquisition strategies, target audiences, promotion of the collection, use of the collection, content types (including graphic novels), and perceived impact of the popular reading collection on campus. Attendees can expect to be part of an interactive discussion on how to launch and configure popular reading collections for their target audience, assess the use and potential impact of these collections, share creative ways to promote the collections, and learn about strategies for contextualizing these collections within the academic library mission and vision.

Speakers
avatar for Carol Cramer

Carol Cramer

Head of Collection Management, Wake Forest University
Carol Joyner Cramer is the Head of Collection Management at the Z. Smith Reynolds Library at Wake Forest University. Before tackling Collection Management, she worked in Reference and as an Electronic Resources Librarian. She has also taught a credit-bearing Information Literacy course... Read More →
avatar for Hilary Davis

Hilary Davis

Department Head, Collections & Research Strategy, North Carolina State University
SM

Suchi Mohanty

Head, R. B. House Undergraduate Library, University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill Libraries
LW

Lynn Whittenberger

Associate Head, Acquisitions and Discovery, North Carolina State University Libraries



Wednesday November 7, 2018 1:00pm - 2:15pm EST
Cooper Room, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

1:00pm EST

State of Play: Research insights on effective educational video in the library
As students and faculty increasingly embrace video as a teaching and learning resource, libraries are often left to grapple with what kind best meet the interest and learning expectations of their constituents. Though there is mutual acceptance of video as a tool and resource, faculty and students have unique behavior and preferences regarding the medium. As various types of platforms, formats, designs, and elements play into what comprises effective video, how should librarians select video content for their libraries? Based on recent empirical research, this presentation will help librarians better understand what faculty and students need from academic video resources.

Dr. Michelle Miller, Professor of Psychological Sciences at Northern Arizona University and Michael Carmichael, Senior Publisher at SAGE Publishing, will utilize their own original research to:
  • Lay the foundation for video’s impact on student engagement in today’s evolving technological learning environment
  • Share original research on the unique behavior and preferences regarding academic video among faculty and students (e.g. desired function, type, features, collection acquisition, and use) to help guide libraries in adopting video content that best supports engaged learning
  • Highlight the benefits of video use for teachers and learners in stimulating stronger course performance, affecting student motivation, and confidence, and attitudes
  • Share findings and insights on strategies for using instructional technology for effective teaching
  • Share findings and insights on the effect of video on learning outcomes, dissecting different ways that design, including length, presenters, and visuals affect student engagement and learning.
The presentation will be moderated by Austina Jordan, Associate Professor of Library Science, Collection Management Librarian, and Coordinator of Information Services at the University of North Georgia at Gainesville. Ample time for Q&A will follow.

Moderators
avatar for Austina Jordan

Austina Jordan

Head of Access Services, University Of North Georgia
I graduated from Covenant College with History Degree. I begrudgingly went to graduate school at the prompting of my adviser where I studied Public History & Library Science at Kent State University. It was a fantastic decision. I've been working in libraries for ten years now. I... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Michael Carmichael

Michael Carmichael

Head of Visual Media, SAGE Publishing
Michael Carmichael is the Head of Visual Media at SAGE Publishing. He has over 20 years of commissioning and editorial experience developing print and digital products for the higher education and academic market. Michael joined SAGE in 1998 where he first spent many years developing... Read More →
avatar for Michelle Miller

Michelle Miller

Professor of Psychological Sciences, Northern Arizona University
Michelle D. Miller is Director of the First Year Learning Initiative and Professor of Psychological Sciences at Northern Arizona University. She is the author of Minds Online: Teaching Effectively with Technology (Harvard University Press, 2014). Dr. Miller teaches courses in cognitive... Read More →


1:00pm EST

The Digital Scholarship Strata: Exploring Options to Support the Widest Cross-Section of the Student and Scholarly Body
"Besides eluding a common definition, the digital humanities often shake traditional conventions around pedagogy, instruction, and learning. But is this a negative attribute? How else can new frontiers of research morph and adapt to current constructs of instruction when they, themselves, are meant to challenge what we think we know and how we approach new research methodologies?

In this session, we’ll talk about various approaches to supporting digital humanities and broader digital scholarship using conventional and unconventional tools, and dig deeper into the discussion of where experimentation ends and instruction begins (and vice versa).

Our speakers are grounded in both new and traditional approaches to digital scholarship and how to enable the use of digital tools in support of text analysis. While speaking on curriculum for digital humanities as taught through their coursework, they’ll also discuss the tactile support of digital scholarship at their institutions in greater detail. Audience participation and sharing of experience will be encouraged as a broad array of perspectives will spur dialogue and help foster ideas.
"

Speakers
avatar for Tim Bucknall

Tim Bucknall

Assistant Dean of Libraries, UNC Greensboro
Tim is founder and convener of the Carolina Consortium, and an inventor of Journal Finder, the first Open URL link resolver. He was recently named the 2014 ACRL Academic/Research Librarian of the Year.
MC

Marc Cormier

Director, Product Management, Gale, a Cengage company
SK

Sarah Ketchley

Former lecturer in the Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilization at the University of Washington, currently, Gale, a Cengage Company


Wednesday November 7, 2018 1:00pm - 2:15pm EST
Laurens Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King St, Charleston, SC 29403, USA

1:00pm EST

The Next Big Thing: Empowering Campus Entrepreneurs
"Entrepreneurial skills used to only be taught in the business school classroom. However, with global entrepreneurship on the rise, business innovation is no longer confined to traditional business programs. Generally, this is where business librarians can make valuable connections with the campus community. Having supported aspiring entrepreneurs for years, these librarians are now serving the larger campus community by teaching non-business majors to use specialized business-library resources.

Please join us for a question and answer-style session with five librarians who will discuss how they support aspiring student entrepreneurs on their campuses, including what library resources meet known demand and how to market those resources beyond the business school. They will also share ways for the library to become a central hub for entrepreneurial development.

Areas of discussion include:

What role can the library play in supporting entrepreneurship across campus, specifically for non-business students, alumni, and community members?
As the social entrepreneurship movement grows, how are libraries supporting those needs?
What resources do students need to support their start-up ambitions?
What role can librarians play in entrepreneurship competitions on their campuses?
Moderators:

Amy Braun, Director, Academic Business & Science Products (Gale, A Cengage Company)

Kristi Ward, Director, Library Editorial (SAGE Publications)

Librarian Panelists:

Wendy Jo Girven, Business Librarian at the University of New Hampshire

Heather Howard, Business Librarian at Purdue

Katharine Macy, Business Librarian at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis

Corey Seeman, Director, Kresge Business Library at the University of Michigan

Alyson Vaaler, Business Librarian at Texas A&M University

"

Speakers
avatar for Amy Braun

Amy Braun

Director, Product Management, Gale, A Cengage Company
Amy Braun is the product management director responsible for building academic business and science products at Gale, a Cengage Company. Creating dynamic tools and content to help students succeed has been her mission since she began as a Gale editor 12 years ago. In her product director... Read More →
avatar for Heather Howard

Heather Howard

Business Information Specialist, Purdue University
avatar for Katharine V. Macy

Katharine V. Macy

Collection Assessment Librarian, IUPUI University Library
avatar for Corey Seeman

Corey Seeman

Director, Kresge Library Services, University of Michigan
Corey Seeman is the Director of Kresge Library Services of the Ross School of Business at the University of Michigan. The unit has recently undergone a great transformation from a traditional library to an electronic-only library service group with the completion of the Ross Construction... Read More →
avatar for Alyson Vaaler

Alyson Vaaler

Business Librarian / Assistant Professor, Texas A&M University
avatar for Kristi Ward

Kristi Ward

Director, Library Editorial, SAGE Publishing


Wednesday November 7, 2018 1:00pm - 2:15pm EST
Ashley Room, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

1:00pm EST

“The Everything Store” by Brad Stone: The Impact of Amazon on Library Services
"In a compelling narrative entitled “The Everything Store” (2013), Brad Stone chronicles the rise of the enviable Amazon enterprise created by the dynamic and innovative technology icon, Jeff Bezos. Based on a series of meticulously-substantiated claims from family, friends and colleagues, Brad Stone attributes the success of Amazon to Bezos’s leadership and vision that combined to foster innovation on an interdisciplinary level and create a lasting impact on the future of books, libraries and the digital world. This fascinating “Amazon Phenomenon” has not only revolutionized “access,” but engendered an operational shift in resource-acquisition technology, research, reading habits, preferences, and styles—all of which are linked to access to library collections and e-commerce in general.

This paper will analyze the impact of the Amazon infrastructure on library acquisitions and management services, with particular reference to ideas enunciated in “ The Everything Store” by Brad Stone. Discussions from experienced library practitioners will explore how Amazon has, in context, detail, insights, and style, enriched and re-shaped academic attitudes to reading, learning, and cultural memory. "

Speakers
avatar for Joyce Dixon-Fyle

Joyce Dixon-Fyle

Professor; COORD/LIBRARIAN, COLLECTION DEVELOPMENT, DePAUW UNIVERSITY
Joyce is an academic librarian (Professor) and Coordinator of Collection Development at DPU, where she has worked for many years. She earned both Ph.D. (French Literature)and MLS degrees from Indiana University, Bloomington, IN. Her primary services include assessing and selecting... Read More →


2:30pm EST

All Roads Lead to Rome: Uncovering New Paths to Discovery
Academic libraries over the past 10 years have embraced web-scale discovery, making it a central point of access on the library homepage.

In a follow-up presentation to the 2016 Charleston Presentation, “If You Can't Beat 'Em, Join 'Em: Embracing Alternative Avenues of Discovery,” we will investigate how libraries are broadening their approach to resource discovery by embedding search beyond the library’s website to other applications such as campus apps, e-resource access tools, and content management systems.

This session will highlight how libraries are meeting patrons at their point of need. We will focus on how libraries can extend themselves within the institutional setting. Presenters will share real-world, examples of collaborative efforts to gain greater awareness of discovery capabilities and library resources to improve research outcomes. Plan for a lively discussion.

Speakers
avatar for Michael Levine-Clark

Michael Levine-Clark

Dean, University of Denver Libraries
avatar for Nate Turajski

Nate Turajski

Senior Field Sales Engineer, Ex Libris, a ProQuest Company
Next-gen library management systems. Discovery services. E-Resource management. Parenting.


Wednesday November 7, 2018 2:30pm - 3:10pm EST
Grand Ballroom 2, Gaillard Center

2:30pm EST

Budgets On My Mind: Changing Budget Allocations to Meet Teaching and Research Needs
The shifting landscape of academic programs, scholarly communication, acquisition environment, and staffing patterns in academic libraries necessitates changes in resources budget structure and allocation models to align with and be responsive to this new landscape. This presentation includes case studies from two libraries. They share changes made to their budget structure and allocation, and invite participants to a conversation on budget allocation models in libraries.

Carnegie Mellon University Libraries is changing their budget allocation in response to new educational programs and new library faculty. This case study will discuss these changes and describe how the budget will be allocated in the future at Carnegie Mellon University.



In fall 2017, the University of Washington Libraries began a multi-year process to examine and update the resources budget structure and allocation. The budget structure and allocation model at UW Libraries remained fundamentally unchanged for over twenty years. Recognizing that the budget structure and allocation model no longer aligned with the changes in our environment UW Libraries initiated this process with the goal of developing a model better designed to serve students and researchers, and allow us to respond nimbly to the challenges and opportunities.

In this case study we will discuss the budget review process and describe the phased approach including an environmental scan, working with a consultant and subject librarians to gather feedback, and describe some of the challenges. We will describe the changes we implemented in the first year.

As part of this process we conducted a survey of academic libraries on their budget structure and allocation practices. The survey ran from June 20 to July 31, 2018 and received 90 responses. We will present a summary of findings from this survey, discuss some conclusions that inform our budget review process, as well as describe trends in academic library budget practices.

Speakers
avatar for Corey Murata

Corey Murata

Director, Collection Analysis and Strategy, University of Washington Libraries
avatar for Denise D Novak

Denise D Novak

Acquisitions Librarian, Carnegie Mellon University
Denise Novak is a senior librarian and Acquisitions Librarian for the Carnegie Mellon University Libraries. She is currently a member of the American Library Association Council. She is a former president of NASIG, served two terms as treasurer of NASIG, and has served on committees... Read More →
avatar for Denise Pan

Denise Pan

Associate Dean, Collections and Content, University of Washington Libraries



Wednesday November 7, 2018 2:30pm - 3:10pm EST
Grand Ballroom 3, Gaillard Center

2:30pm EST

Building a narrative for researchers around open research impact
Around the world, we continue to see a proliferation in policy direction relating to open access and open research. Uptake of OA has continued to grow, with growing awareness from researchers about the benefits of open research. However, how researchers understand the impact of publishing openly – from articles to books and research data - is sketchy at best. A number of studies have attempted to understand how open research is increasing scholarly impact, predominantly from a bibliometric perspective. In this session we will provide a publisher, library, researcher and funder perspective on how and why we are working to increase understanding amongst researchers of the reach and impact of publishing open access articles, books and data.

Speakers
avatar for Rachel Borchardt

Rachel Borchardt

Associate Director, Research and Instructional Services, and Science Librarian, American University
Rachel Borchardt is the science librarian at American University. Her professional research focuses on the intersection of metrics and libraries, and she has written and presented on the topic in many venues, including a recent book publication titled Meaningful Metrics: A 21st-Century... Read More →
avatar for Mithu Lucraft

Mithu Lucraft

Marketing Director, Outreach and Open Research, Springer Nature
Mithu Lucraft has worked in academic publishing since 2004. A passion for storytelling combined with a lasting commitment to scholarly communications has led her through a variety of Marketing and Communications roles, including at Oxford University Press, Sage Publishing and Palgrave... Read More →
avatar for Sara Rouhi

Sara Rouhi

Director of Engagement & Advocacy for Altmetric and Dimensions, Digital Science
Sara Rouhi is Director of Engagement & Advocacy for Dimensions with responsibility for education and outreach in the US and Canada for both Digital Science’s new Dimensions platform and Digital Science’s alternative metrics company, Altmetric. She... Read More →
avatar for David Sommer

David Sommer

Product Director and Co-founder, Kudos
David is Product Director and Co-founder of Kudos - the award winning service for researchers, institutions and publishers to help maximise the impact of published work. David has over 20 years' of experience in the global publishing industry, having held senior technology and sales... Read More →



2:30pm EST

Crawling to walking to sitting on clouds: The path to efficiency and happiness for Acquisitions
How do Acquisitions departments efficiently acquire all the resources needed for the modern academic research library? University of Michigan Library and Stanford Libraries will discuss current order processes and describe each institution’s evolution in reviewing and modernizing acquisitions practices to move from paper to electronic ordering.
Topics include:
Partnering with selectors
Managing expectations internally and externally
Breaking down print vs. electronic format and recurring vs. one-time order silos
Moving from manual to automated workflows
Navigating multiple systems (ERMs, LMSs, university financial management systems)
Evaluating and implementing tools for making workflows more efficient
Additionally we will hear how FOLIO plans to implement various apps for improving workflows and staff experiences when acquiring resources. Learn about taking risks and embracing change, and find out what your library can do to make ordering more efficient.

Speakers
avatar for Ann-Marie Breaux

Ann-Marie Breaux

VP, Workflow Management Services, EBSCO Information Services
SF

Sarah Forzetting

Digital Collections Librarian, Stanford Libraries
avatar for James Gulvas

James Gulvas

Acquisitions Librarian & Order Unit Manager, University of Michigan Library
Oversee the acquisitions and renewal of major electronic resource packages through consortia, vendors, and publishers; while working collaboratively with other team leaders to define responsibilities and workflows, and to identify new service opportunities. Facilitate the purchase... Read More →



Wednesday November 7, 2018 2:30pm - 3:10pm EST
Gold Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel

2:30pm EST

Destroyer and preserver; hear, oh hear! Not all uncirculated books must chariotest to a dark wintry bed. How we used the OCLC WorldCat Search API to inform our weeding decisions with holdings data.
Weeding a specialized collection, such as the oceanography subset of the marine science collection at the Marine Resources Library, requires thinking beyond our own walls and users. To ensure potential access to weeded items through other libraries, as well as the preservation of items unique to our own collection, we sought an efficient and free means to incorporate national holdings data into our decision-making process. The OCLC WorldCat Search API enables bibliographic data, as well as holdings from other libraries, to easily be obtained. With a Python script we obtained holdings data for most of our several thousand oceanography items, making more than ten thousand queries of the API over six minutes. We identified holdings of this collection subset within our five peer libraries, NOAA regional libraries, PASCAL (SC state consortium) libraries, LVIS member libraries, and libraries in the USA, to inform (not determine) our weeding decisions.

This session will introduce the reasoning behind the evaluation of holdings of several groups of libraries that we believe important to consider when weeding our specialized collection. An overview of the WorldCat Search API will demonstrate to attendees how we freely accessed this data and challenges of interpretation will be discussed. Participants will be invited to contribute their ideas and experience in considering other libraries’ holdings when weeding a collection.

Speakers
GT

Geoff Timms

Librarian for Marine Resources, College of Charleston
Professional interests are information literacy of graduate students and the creation of web applications to enhance user experience of libraries and improve internal process efficiency. As Librarian for Marine Resources, I feel obliged to fish regularly.



2:30pm EST

East meets West: the Japan Assoc. of National University Libraries (JANUL) and the University of Central Florida (UCF) exchange Librarians and Learning Commons information
Two academic librarians (one from Kobe University, Japan; the other from the University of Central Florida) will discuss visits to each other’s libraries in 2016-2017 to share information about their respective Learning Commons models and outreach strategies. The goal of this session will be to illustrate the positive learning outcomes of such an exchange and to provide nuts and bolts information for libraries who might be considering a similar exchange.

The Japan Assoc. of National University Libraries (JANUL) invited Barbara Tierney (UCF Head of Research Services) to make a presentation on “The Learning Commons Service Model in North America” at their JANUL winter symposium (Univ. of Tokyo, Jan. 2016) and to travel to Kobe University to make a presentation on the Subject Librarian service model within a Learning Commons environment.

After Barbara delivered her presentations in Tokyo and Kobe, JANUL officials asked if one of their librarians, Yuka Taniguchi (from Kobe University Libraries) could visit the University of Central Florida in Sept. 2017 for a two-week internship with UCF Libraries financed by a JANUL Travel Grant.

While at UCF, Yuka worked within the main library Knowledge Commons, spent time within each library department, sat in on library management and departmental meetings, and visited the UCF Health Sciences and Curriculum Materials Libraries. In return, Yuka gave a presentation at UCF on “Japanese Academic Libraries.” After Yuka returned to Japan she gave presentations about her UCF experiences at JANUL events.

Program attendees will be encouraged to ask questions about the learning objectives of academic library foreign exchanges and what the pros and cons of such an exchange might be from their own institutional perspectives. After participating in this program, attendees will be able to develop strategies to support a similar foreign exchange at their own institutions.

Speakers
avatar for Yuka Taniguchi

Yuka Taniguchi

Librarian, Kobe University Libraries
Librarian, Kobe University Libraries (2012 to the present)Yuka was an overseas trainee financed by a JANUL (Japan Association of National University Libraries) Travel Grant to University of Central Florida Libraries from Sept. 18 to 29, 2017.Yuka was a invited speaker at the 65th... Read More →
avatar for Barbara Tierney

Barbara Tierney

Head of Research & Information Services, University of Central Florida Libraries
Barbara is Head of Research and Information Services for the University of Central Florida Libraries (2013 to the present). She formerly served as the Head of Research and Information Services for the University of North Carolina, Charlotte (2011-2012). Barbara was an Invited... Read More →



Wednesday November 7, 2018 2:30pm - 3:10pm EST
Cooper Room, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

2:30pm EST

From the Winter of Messy Data into the Spring of Standardization: eBook Vendor Data Re-envisioned
*This presentation was also co-authored by Xiying Mi , Metadata Librarian at University of South Florida, who was unable to attend the conference.

The University of South Florida (USF) Libraries run several projects which involve collecting and displaying ebooks vendor metadata. These projects include seven Evidence Based Acquisitions (EBA) programs, one Patron Driven Acquisitions (PDA) program and the eBooks for Classroom Plus (EB+) database. The main focus of the projects is to support the Libraries’ Textbook Affordability Project (TAP). The TAP initiative’s goal is to help reduce textbook cost to students by encouraging faculty to use library purchased ebooks in the classroom. The metadata used in these projects is collected from a variety of vendor sources including titles lists, K-Bart files, entitlement lists and Marc records. Compiling data from various sources into a usable form can sometimes be a daunting task. The USF Libraries Metadata Team has developed processes which allows the library to collect ebook information from various vendors and multiple sources and standardize it into uniform formats. Standardized metadata provides the means for USF Libraries to track and maintain the various ebooks projects.

This presentation will give a brief history of USF Libraries EBA/PDA programs and the eBooks for the Classroom Plus database project. The libraries’ various uses of the vendor supplied ebook metadata will be discussed. Specific metadata issues related to EBA/PDA programs will be addressed along with standardization issues involving the eBooks for the Classroom Plus database. Data standardization and metadata clean-up workflows will be shared. Suggestions for providing more customizable vendor data will be proposed. Finally, an open discussion session will provide the audience with a forum to interact and share ideas, make recommendations, and ask questions about ebook metadata standardization.

Speakers
BF

Brian Falato

Senior Cataloger, University of South Florida
I have been doing original cataloging of books, journals, and video (both print and electronic) for 20 years. As we have gotten more involved with e-books at my institution, I have been increasingly focusing on batch loading. I have an interest in all forms of communication and... Read More →
avatar for Bonita Pollock

Bonita Pollock

Metadata Librarian, University of South Florida Libraries
I am the coordinator of metadata/cataloging at the University of South Florida Libraries Tampa Campus. My Research Agenda involves implementing Semantic Web Technologies into the library setting.



Wednesday November 7, 2018 2:30pm - 3:10pm EST
Calhoun Room, Francis Marion Hotel

2:30pm EST

How can digital course resource lists transform teaching and learning?
Digital course resource lists can be an incredibly powerful tool in supporting teaching and learning, but often don’t receive the careful attention required to successfully serve students.

In this session, two senior UK librarians will detail how they work with resource list technology to successfully administer course resource lists curated by faculty, improve resource discoverability, and transform the academic experience.

Drawing upon many years of experience with technology that integrates course resource list and copyright management solutions, the speakers will share:

*Initial university goals and eventual milestones when integrating the system
*How their processes evolved and what they ended up delivering
*How the initiative resulted in new efficiencies with digital learning resource discovery, access, and consumption
*How digital resource lists provide an invaluable stimuli for collection development strategies
*How resultant aggregate data informs and improves collection management and can enrich educational analytics
*How their initiatives fit within the wider university strategic plan

The session will conclude with ample time for questions from attendees.

Speakers
avatar for Mark Bush

Mark Bush

Head of Commercial Development, Talis. A SAGE Company
Interested in hearing about approaches and challenges associated with course reading lists in North America. Talis works with over 60% of UK universities to provide course resource list systems in support of student experience and effective collections management.
avatar for Ian Snowley

Ian Snowley

Dean of Student Learning Development and University Librarian, University of Lincoln
I joined the University of Lincoln, as University Librarian in September 2009, before that he was Head of Higher Education at the British Library.My professional career began in Public Libraries followed by posts in the Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food and the Department... Read More →
NW

Nick Woolley

Director of Student and Library Services, Northumbria University
From Westminster, London, Nick is a graduate of the University of Exeter, the University of Sheffield, and London Metropolitan University. Nick is currently Director of Student and Library Services at Northumbria University and has worked in many different roles in several academic... Read More →



Wednesday November 7, 2018 2:30pm - 3:10pm EST
Ashley Room, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

2:30pm EST

Institutional Access, Individual Actions – Understanding user behaviors in accessing full-text on the open web
Sponsored by Clarivate Analytics. 

Users are trying to access journal articles all over the internet. While for most researchers ,institutional subscription access is largely in place, the content is not being exposed to them at the point of need. Instead, users are choosing ‘their own ways’ to access journal articles. With tools like Kopernio and in combination with Web of Science, we now have an opportunity to better understand user needs in accessing full-text, while making sure an institution can deliver subscription content to end-users, engage researchers at the point of need, bring valuable subscriptions to life.

Speakers
avatar for Gail Clement

Gail Clement

Head of Research Services, CalTech
"Author Carpentry": best practices, top tools, and timely topics to prepare 21st century researchers to prepare and disseminate knowledge in the rapidly evolving scholarly communication ecosystem.
JR

Jan Reichelt

Managing Director, Web of Science, Clarivate Analytics

Sponsors
avatar for Clarivate Analytics

Clarivate Analytics

 Clarivate Analytics provides insights to accelerate discovery and evaluate impact through products and services including EndNote, InCites, Kopernio, Publons, ScholarOne and Web of Science.


Wednesday November 7, 2018 2:30pm - 3:10pm EST
Colonial Ballroom, Embassy Suites

2:30pm EST

Is High Use Really a "Big Deal?" Using Accessible Data and Advanced Analytics to Better Value Journal Packages
Libraries typically buy most of their journals content in packages, and commonly look at metrics of usage and cost per use (CPU). But we also know that not all uses are equally valuable, and indeed that some?, many?, most? uses may actually be replaceable. For example, an undergraduate may have selected an article that appeared high in a results list, but would have simply used another had that one not been available. How much of our journal usage is "replaceable?" If we were to omit "replaceable" use from our CPU calculations, how much value would remain? Which "big deals" - if any - would still look like deals at all?

Can data analytics help us easily see trends regarding what kinds of use our journals receive, and therefore what sorts of needs particular journal packages seem to address? NC State's Darby Orcutt hypothesized a simple method to address this question. Using COUNTER-compliant usage data, he and colleagues analyzed data for a select sample (VERY promising results!) and then for virtually all of NC State's journal subscriptions.

Although JSTOR is not a “big deal” publisher, they were intrigued by this approach and its potential usefulness for understanding journal use beyond simply for “big deal” evaluation. Therefore JSTOR’s Bruce Heterick and colleagues similarly applied this method to the aggregate use data for all of their journals.

What did we discover?

Sorry, we're not ruining the surprise. Y'all come. 



Speakers
avatar for Bruce Heterick

Bruce Heterick

SVP, Open Collections & Infrastrucutre, ITHAKA
avatar for Darby Orcutt

Darby Orcutt

Assistant Head, Collections & Research Strategy, NC State University Libraries
I am a librarian, teacher, researcher, and leader deeply interested and involved in interdisciplinary and computational research, the future of higher ed, and cultural aspects of digital transformation.Assistant Head, Collections & Research Strategy, NC State University LibrariesFaculty... Read More →


Wednesday November 7, 2018 2:30pm - 3:10pm EST
Grand Ballroom 1, Gaillard Center

2:30pm EST

Is Spring Too Far Behind For Obsolete Media?
As media formats, and the machines used to play them, become obsolete, it is essential for institutions to act now to digitize and preserve this content before it’s lost for good. Libraries and archives hold large numbers of obsolete audio and video formats that are actively degrading, many of which contain content with high research value. In addition, acquiring and maintaining equipment to play these items is becoming increasingly problematic. If projects continue to be postponed, it may be too late. However, the complexity and costs of digitizing and preserving these formats often puts projects out of reach for many libraries and archives. Small institutions may struggle to find the needed resources where large institutions struggle to combine resources across many units. One way to address this impending loss of content is to build support across the institution for a digitization and preservation project. Whether an organization chooses to digitize the materials in-house or outsource the work, the scope, costs, and technological challenges of these specialized formats require broad participation. Librarians and archivists are uniquely poised to establish a vision, and work with IT and Media experts to build the strategies and partnerships to bring a project to fruition. This session will use Indiana University’s Media Digitization and Preservation Initiative as a case study; however, we will focus broadly on how to develop a media digitization plan, discuss some of the key workflow decisions and technological needs, and explore how to effectively build a case to turn this into a campus wide-initiative.

Speakers
avatar for Sherri Michaels

Sherri Michaels

Head of Collection Management and Director of MDPI Library Operations, Indiana University
Sherri Michaels is currently the Head of Collection Management at Indiana University. She also serves as the Director of MDPI Library Operations. The Media Digitization and Preservation Initiative is a project to digitize media and film by IU's Bicentennial in 2020. Sherri received... Read More →


Wednesday November 7, 2018 2:30pm - 3:10pm EST
Laurens Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King St, Charleston, SC 29403, USA

2:30pm EST

Objectionable materials and the academic library
The topic of the academic library’s obligation to purchase potentially objectionable materials for teaching and research has received little attention. This presentation opens debate on the issue that the study of some topics has the potential to offend the primary users of the academic library and the surrounding community. The presentation considers both philosophical and practical issues and makes a distinction between public and private colleges/universities.

Objectionable materials are sometimes important to meet valid teaching and research needs of both faculty and students. The first category includes primary sources needed to understand the topic but whose content the researcher/teacher opposes. Examples include Hitler’s Mein Kampf, hate speech, Holocaust denial, support for terrorism, and prostitution/sex trafficking studies. The second category includes topics that the researcher/teacher does not consider objectionable but that would offend some segments of the population. Examples include “deviant” sexual behavior, pornography, and erotic art and literature. LGBT topics in support of gender studies may fall into this category.

This session asks whether the academic library has the obligation to purchase and make available both types of potentially objectionable materials. The simple answer is that public universities and colleges have the same obligation to support faculty members and students who teach, study, or research controversial materials as it does for any other faculty and students. Not doing so on the basis of moral concerns violates the principle of the separation of church and states as embodied in the First Amendment. Any public policies need to be content neutral as long as the materials are legal. Private institutions may follow different rules.

The final reason for their availablility in all universities and colleges is academic freedom and, more importantly for librarians, the Library Bill of Rights, a core value of librarianship.

Speakers
avatar for Bob Holley

Bob Holley

Professor Emeritus, School of Library & Information Science, Wayne State University
Professor Emeritus, Wayne State University School of Library & Information Science. Bob Holley has been actively involved in collection development since 1980 as an academic librarian, library science professor, and researcher. He was chief collection development officer at the University... Read More →



2:30pm EST

Read & Publish: What Changes Can Libraries Expect?
What does a “Read & Publish” model actually mean for librarians and for publishers? Read & Publish arrangements are becoming more prominent across the scholarly communications landscape, especially with national consortia in Europe. What goes into creating these agreements, and what will their impact be on authors, librarians, and publishers? A panel of librarians and publishers (to be announced), moderated by AIP Publishing, will talk about the opportunities and challenges presented by developing and implementing a model that merges publication and access to content.

By bringing stakeholders together, this panel will offer frank insights into what librarians need to know if their institution implements an R&P program, as well as open discussion on what publishers can do to make this model sustainable and transparent. Questions will be solicited from conference attendees in advance of the session, and time will be allotted for Q&A.

Speakers
avatar for Curtis Brundy

Curtis Brundy

AUL for Scholarly Communications and Collections, Iowa State University
I oversee collections and scholarly communications at Iowa State, which is a signatory of the OA2020 initiative. I am active with several groups that are interested in seeing, as well as assisting, scholarly publishers and societies transition to open business models.
avatar for Katharine Dunn

Katharine Dunn

Scholarly Communications Librarian, MIT Libraries
avatar for Josh Horowitz

Josh Horowitz

Digital Library & Advertising Sales Director, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM)
Josh Horowitz is currently Digital Library & Advertising Sales Director at the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM).  In this role, he manages ACM’s institutional subscription and advertising business in the academic, corporate and government sectors.  Prior to ACM, Josh... Read More →
KS

Kevin Steiner

Head of Global Sales, AIP Publishing


2:30pm EST

Red Light, Green Light: The Intersection of Libraries, Vendors, Apps and OER
San Jose State University has been working to reduce textbook costs to students since 2012 through its Affordable Learning $olutions (AL$) campaign. As part of a larger California State University initiative, SJSU’s AL$ program has been coordinated by two librarians since its inception. Recently, the program has focused on the adoption of open educational resource (OER) material by teaching faculty to help with the rising cost of textbooks.



In this presentation, we will discuss how the maturing field of OER is
now intersecting with libraries, vendors, and apps. Participants will learn
about developments in OER discovery and ‘acquisition,’ particularly the growing
interest of commercial vendors. Questions addressed will include:


· Who has the responsibility for encouraging integration of these materials into the curriculum?

· What does the monetizing of OER mean for libraries?

· Should libraries team up with vendors to promote OER apps and platforms?


If the goal is to lower the cost of textbooks to students, then vendor platforms and apps can be another alternative to consider. By the end of this presentation, participants will have a better idea of whether or not to green light platforms and apps for open educational resources at their own institutions.

Speakers
CB

Christa Bailey

Liaison Librarian / Co-Coordinator Affordable Learning $olutions, San Jose State University
avatar for Adriana Poo

Adriana Poo

Liaison Librarian / Co-Coordinator Affordable Learning $olutions, San Jose State University


2:30pm EST

Short Books: Why They are Published, the Obstacles they Face, and their Prospects for Success
Fifty years ago, when standard monographs reigned, the Journal of Scholarly Publishing included in its inaugural issue a case for the short book and named it an “ideal form” for some scholarly purposes. A recent observer notes that the format has languished for decades, though the Very Short Introductions series from the Oxford University Press has been an exception. But we now have short books from several scholarly and commercial publishers, including the new Charleston Briefings. Hundreds of titles have been published in recent years. There is a history of the short book, all the way back to the political pamphlet, but digital communications in this century have meant new conditions for its role in scholarly publishing, including open access. This session, according to its title, will be in three parts, beginning with what publishers now say about the timeliness and utility of short books, and some data on short book publishing from a sample of academic presses. Short books offer appealing options to authors (e.g., in the timeline of research, writing, and publication) and to publishers in appealing to contemporary reading habits and to new audiences. Still, short books present problems in discovery and recognition, the latter in citations and reviews, but also in their role in the academic rewards system with what it typically demands in standard length monographs. Prospects for the success of short books, as publishers acknowledge, will reflect the interest of scholars in writing them and then how well they can be marketed, including their appeal for library collections. Finally, to demonstrate what might be expected of scholars, the presentation will offer an account of the experience of a prominent anthropologist and short book author who names reasons for colleagues, publishers, and libraries to welcome the form.

Speakers
MI

Matthew Ismail

Director of Collection Development, Central Michigan University Library
SW

Steve Weiland

Professor of Higher Education, Michigan State University


Wednesday November 7, 2018 2:30pm - 3:10pm EST
Pinckney Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

2:30pm EST

Spring Forward: Collaborating to Build and Assess a Collection of Learning Objects
Interactive learning addressing library skills and the research process were embedded into all sections of a university course via the online learning management system, reaching a student population of over 200 students each semester. In this session, attendees will learn what library instructional learning objects and activities were collaboratively developed and how they were created, collected and assessed.

After implementation, an analysis of the efficacy of the learning objects was undertaken. Which learning objects and activities were most effective? What were the outcomes and what was learned from the assessment process? Details of the investigation into whether these modules can contribute to student success and an overview of the way in which assessment can impact revision of such materials will be shared with the audience.

This presentation will give attendees an opportunity to discuss their own experiences with the creation and assessment of library learning objects and give the presenters a platform to report on the creation and assessment of their modules. We will examine whether this approach provides an advantage to teaching the research process. In addition, this presentation will contribute to the body of library literature about assessment as we engage our audience in thinking through how to enhance and assess their own library instructional content.

Ultimately, did the outcomes successfully contribute to the student research process and their research papers?

Speakers
SJ

Stephanie Jacobs

Assistant Librarian, Instructional Technologist/Blended Librarian, University of South Florida
avatar for Audrey Powers

Audrey Powers

Associate Librarian, University of South Florida
I am an Associate Librarian at the University of South Florida. Currently, I work with students and faculty in The College of The Arts, but in my former life I was a Science librarian. These very different roles have provided me with the unique opportunity to work with researchers... Read More →


2:30pm EST

Textbook Alternatives for Less Expensive and Better Pedagogy
Presents strategic alternatives to expensive commercial textbooks, including the adoption of free OER (Open Educational Resources) materials and/or the substitution of already obtained library materials. The session will discuss successful faculty orientation methods, existing initiatives (including consortial efforts and grants), and outreach to student organizations. The emphases will be on both saving students dollars and improving pedagogy (actual testing and the implications for targeted flipped classroom approaches).

Speakers
avatar for David Stern

David Stern

Library Director, Saint Xavier University
librarian emulation programs, subject customization of web sites.



Wednesday November 7, 2018 2:30pm - 3:10pm EST
Salon II, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401, USA

2:30pm EST

Today’s Selection, Ordering, and Acquisition Environment: How I learned to stop worrying and love antiques, archaic models, and a good workaround
Librarians and their patrons enjoy access to a wealth of content today. An explosive growth of books, dissertations, reports, data-sets and emerging e-content like blogs and open access journals has created a rich feast for readers, scholars, scientists, researchers.

But on the flipside, workflows and supporting systems haven’t kept up, creating unprecedented problems for the librarians who are trying to bring it all together – redundant, manual workflows; low circulating titles that eat up shelf space; multiple vendor platforms, invoicing, and access models.

What kind of new system or systems do we need? How might we address the major pain points? In this lively session, a panel of librarians with expertise in acquisition and selection will discuss this current environment and how they’re working within it. You’ll learn about:

• Work-arounds and best practices that help reduce errors in manual processes
• Short cuts that deal with redundant workflows
• Ways to organize vendor information and interaction
• How to keep approval plans up-to-date and useful
• Using analytics and DDA to reduce just-in-case buying

We’ll wrap up our discussion with a wish list for the future: what librarians want and need to simplify this complex environment.

Speakers
FB

Fern Brody

AUL Collections & T.S., University of Pittsburgh
HM

Holly Mercer

Senior Associate Dean, University of Tennessee
avatar for Janet Morrow

Janet Morrow

Head, Resource & Discovery Services, Northeastern University Libraries
Janet Morrow is the Head, Resource & Discovery Services at Northeastern University's Snell Library in Boston. She earned her MLIS from Simmons College in 1984 and has been at Northeastern in various acquisitions, e-resources & technical services roles since 1994.
avatar for Bob Nardini

Bob Nardini

Vice President Library Services, ProQuest
RW

Richard Wisneski

Associate University Librarian, Discovery and Delivery, University at Buffalo Libraries
Interim University Associate Librarian. Oversee Technical Services, Delivery Services, and Collections. Also, institutional lead for ProQuest Alma/Primo LSP migration.


Wednesday November 7, 2018 2:30pm - 3:10pm EST
Colonial Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel

2:30pm EST

University Metadata and Retrieval: Updating the Library Cataloging Process

Challenge of Discovery: Recent large scale initiatives focused the attention of the Smathers Libraries at the University of Florida on the need for significantly expanded and enhanced metadata for our digital collections, both retrospective and prospective. This requires new tools and changing roles and responsibilities for cataloging/metadata staff, including the application of automated processes, Improved and consistent metadata practices, and the development of new taxonomies. Projects that are described include the new genealogical initiatives with Internet Archive and Family Search, Portal of Florida History, the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) and the Cuban Heritage Initiatives.

The results of the pilot and its application to our digital collections indicated the need for more automated processes going forward to allow traditional cataloging to focus on the things that need individual attention and use automated tools to develop and improve metadata for other materials. We are working with tools that have been developed for information products and services, but can be applied effectively to library collections.

Speakers
avatar for Marjorie M. K. Hlava

Marjorie M. K. Hlava

President, Access Innovations, Inc.
Marjorie M.K. Hlava is President, Chairman, and founder of Access Innovations, Inc. Very well known in the international information arena, she is the founding Chair of the new SLA Taxonomy Division established in August 2009. She is past president of NFAIS (2002-2003), the organization... Read More →
BW

Ben Walker

Associate Dean Digital Services & Shared Collections, University of Florida


Wednesday November 7, 2018 2:30pm - 3:10pm EST
Salon I, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401, USA

2:30pm EST

Stopwatch Session
These short “pecha kucha-like” sessions will feature five PowerPoint presentations of 6 minutes and 40 seconds each. We will have time at the end of the session intended for Q&A for all presenters. Come for a lively, rapid-fire group of talks.

1) From single product to marketplace: How Open Access develops (Sven Fund, Knowledge Unlatched; Catherine Anderson, Knowledge Unlatched) 

Open Access is developing rapidly, especially around books. Publishers and new initiatives are teaming up to push for standards and share resources at the same time. This presentation gives an overview of the state and landscape of OA publishing worldwide, analyzes the benefits of enhanced cooperation for both publishers and libraries, and maps out future challenges. Especially the evolving role of analytics in better decision-making of which titles to make available in OA and which to financially support as a librarian will be discussed.

2) Making Open Access Discoverable (Drew Bakr, Claremont School of Theology; Thomas Phillips, Claremont School of Theology) 

High quality Open Access content exists in abundance; the problem is reliable discoverability. This presentation will explain how to create and curate Open Access collections in OCLC's WMS. This presentation will explain how to overcome the challenges of unstable urls, unprofessional metadata, and low quality content. This presentation will explain how the Digital Theological Library (DGLTH) and its newborn sibling, the Open Access Digital Theological Library (OADTL), have created the world's only fully open digital library powered by OCLC discovery in a economically feasible manner.

3) Embedding Open Access into Research Workflows through the Public Access Submission System (PASS) (Sayeed Choudhury, Johns Hopkins University) 

Johns Hopkins University, Harvard University, MIT, and 221B are developing the Public Access Submission System (PASS) which will support compliance with US funding agencies' public access policies and institutional open access policies. By combining workflows between the two compliance pathways, PASS facilitates simultaneous submission into funder repositories (e.g., PubMedCentral) and institutional repositories. We intend to integrate a data archive such that researchers can submit articles and data at the same time. This talk will include a demonstration of PASS in action and outline the steps by which we have engaged the university's central administration (including the President's office and the Provost’s office) to provide funding and sponsorship for PASS and engaged US funding agencies including the National Institutes of Health who have offered access to APIs, etc. and the National Science Foundation which discussed ways to integrate PASS and their reporting system in the future. Further information about PASS is available at https://osf.io/8qfzj/

4) Libraries Purchasing Textbooks (Jennifer Culley, The University of Southern Mississippi)

Many college students go without textbooks because they are too expensive. Can Libraries help? The University of Southern Mississippi, recently implemented a program that provides access to print textbooks for students enrolled in the general education courses. This program is to, dually, help the students with skyrocketing fees for textbooks and support the University mission by assisting with student success. The program, named the Golden Eagle Textbook Initiative (GETI), began in the fall of 2017 with a $10,000 grant from the University. GETI was created, and is run, by the Acquisitions and the Circulation Units of the Library. This presentation will give details about the grant, purchasing of materials, cataloging and processing of the materials, and some information about usage. GETI was such a success it has been approved to continue for a second year with a few changes, with full library funding.

5) Springing for Student Textbooks? Exploring New Directions for Library Collections (Alexandria Quesenberry, University of Tennessee Health Science Center;  Paul Gahn, University of Tennessee Health Science Center; G. Randall Watts, University of Tennessee Health Science Center)

Given the increasing costs of student textbooks, it is only natural that students would engage in cost-avoidance behaviors.  Likewise, some professors have modified their curricular choices to avoid passing along the cost of required texts for their students. Using an adapted version of a previously created survey, University of Tennessee Health Science Center faculty were asked questions about currently licensed platforms, the selection of course textbooks, and the importance of textbook availability. Proposed future actions include expanding textbooks offerings, exploring potential funding streams to support the expansion, and librarian involvement in curricular development and textbook selection.
During this presentation, the results of a collection survey designed for nursing faculty members at a public medical university will be discussed. Attendees can expect to learn about surveying interest at their own institutions, librarian involvement in curricular decisions, and implications for the future.


Moderators
avatar for Tony Horava

Tony Horava

Associate University Librarian, Content and Access, University of Ottawa
The Big Deal has been a major challenge at our university, as we dealt with budget cuts, exchange rate issues, annual increases to the costs of scholarly resources, and the demand for new resources in many fields. The Big Deal is a complex iceberg floating in the middle of all this... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Catherine Anderson

Catherine Anderson

Sales Director, Knowledge Unlatched
Catherine has worked for over 20 years in various Sales roles in Publishing and Library Supply in Europe. After working for international publishers such as Harcourt and Elsevier she headed up the German Sales Team for De Gruyter, based in Berlin. Then after a few years working for... Read More →
avatar for Sayeed Choudhury

Sayeed Choudhury

Associate Dean, Johns Hopkins Sheridan Libraries, Leading the JHU OSPO, Johns Hopkins University
G. Sayeed Choudhury is the Associate Dean for Research Data Management and Hodson Director of the Digital Research and Curation Center at the Sheridan Libraries of Johns Hopkins University. Choudhury is also a member of the Executive Committee for the Institute of Data Intensive... Read More →
avatar for Jennifer Culley

Jennifer Culley

Collection Management and Acquisitions Librarian, The University of Southern Mississippi
avatar for Sven Fund

Sven Fund

Managing Director, Knowledge Unlatched
I am passionate about making Open Access work for both publishers and librarians.
avatar for Paul Gahn

Paul Gahn

Assistant Director for Electronic & Collection Services, University of Tennessee Health Sciences Center
Assistant Director | Electronic and Collection Services
TP

Thomas Phillips

Dean, Claremont School of Theology
avatar for Alexandria Quesenberry

Alexandria Quesenberry

Research & Learning Services Librarian, University of Tennessee Health Science Center



3:10pm EST

Refreshment Break
Wednesday November 7, 2018 3:10pm - 3:40pm EST
TBA

3:40pm EST

American Exceptionalism: Three Ways in which the United States Remains an Outlier on the Global Academic Stage
It’s long been obvious that on many of the key political issues of the day, the United States remains an outlier. Whether we’re talking climate change, healthcare, or gun control, it’s clear that U.S. governments, both Republican and Democratic, have pursued agendas substantially to the right of their counterparts in Western Europe and other regions.

In this session, we’re not going to dig into those or any other hot-button political issues. Instead, we’ll explore a similar divide that appears to exist in academic librarianship and scholarly research. We will focus on differences in attitudes toward national libraries, approaches to open access publishing, and the perceived value of qualitative research.

Speakers
avatar for Adam Blackwell

Adam Blackwell

Product Manager Lead, ProQuest
Adam has worked at ProQuest for 16 years, during which time he wrote the content for and oversaw the development of ProQuest’s information literacy product (Research Companion). He currently works on ProQuest’s platform and dissertations teams.Before ProQuest, Adam taught literature... Read More →
MC

Michele Cloonan

Dean Emerita & Professor, Simmons University



Wednesday November 7, 2018 3:40pm - 4:20pm EST
Cooper Room, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

3:40pm EST

Automatic institution-specific holdings feeds are a win for everybody!
Libraries face many challenges with maintaining electronic resource holdings that are constantly changing. In this session, attendees will learn how libraries and a knowledge base are working together to ensure accurate, up-to-date MARC records and holdings via automated, institution-specific feeds that make collections more discoverable while saving libraries time and frustration.

Library panelists will share their e-resource challenges including how automated, institution-specific holdings feeds fit seamlessly into their current workflows to expedite the process of connecting patrons to a library’s electronic collection. Plus, you will learn how you can make automated institution-specific holdings feeds a reality in your organization.

Please join us for the interactive panel discussion that follows to learn how automated institution-specific holdings feeds can help you with your e-resource holdings maintenance.

Panel participants include:
  • Ron Lewis, Acquisitions Librarian, Loyola Marymount University
  • Dan Fitzroy, Discovery & Metadata Services Librarian, Sacred Heart University
  • Nina Servizzi, Associate Dean, Knowledge Access & Resource Management Services, New York University 
  • Jody Stroh, Product Manager, OCLC

Speakers
avatar for Daniel Fitzroy

Daniel Fitzroy

Discovery & Metadata Services Librarian, Sacred Heart University
avatar for Ron Lewis

Ron Lewis

Acquisitions Librarian, Loyola Marymount University William H. Hannon Library
avatar for Nina Servizzi

Nina Servizzi

Associate Dean for Knowledge Access and Resource Management Services, New York University
avatar for Jody Stroh

Jody Stroh

Product Manager, Metadata Services, OCLC


3:40pm EST

Collecting Standards for Scholarship, Organization, Industry, and Innovation
Building on the successful 2017 presentation, A Primer in Science and Engineering Collection Development, this presentation will explore a content type that stumps the engineering librarian and acquisitions librarian alike - standards. Technical standards are documents that establish a uniform practice or process for materials, procedures, and products. Each of us uses standards daily - from USB ports to elevators to lights, automobiles, bridges, standardized train tracks, and much more. Standards are prepared and issued by a professional groups, committees, societies, or governmental agencies, and can influence safety and performance and the role of business and manufacturing.

Four librarians from diverse institutions, responsible for science and engineering collection development, will outline their libraries’ relationship to standards. Presenters will discuss the importance of standards to the researcher, the curriculum, innovation, and even to our own library systems. They will outline each of their institutions’ strategies for acquiring and providing access to standards, along with budget ramifications, and how to align standards’ acquisition with university purchasing guidelines. Lastly, the panel will highlight key sources and suppliers of domestic and global standards.

Speakers
avatar for Julia Gelfand

Julia Gelfand

Applied Sciences & Engineering Librarian, University of California, Irvine
Julia Gelfand has participated in many Charleston conferences for nearly 20 years.  She continues to have interests in many aspects of the library, publisher, vendor triad that shapes collection development decisions and is watching the tides shift with new and emerging technologies... Read More →
avatar for Ibironke Lawal

Ibironke Lawal

Science and Engineering Collections Librarian, Virginia Commonwealth University
I have been at VCU for over a decade as collections librarian and liaison to the School of Engineering and science departments in the College of Humanities and Sciences. Developing and maintaining relevant collections, providing effective service to students, moving them toward academic... Read More →
avatar for Jill Hanson Powell

Jill Hanson Powell

Engineering Librarian, Cornell University
Jill Powell is Engineering Librarian at Cornell University. She has a B.A. from Cornell and an MLS from Syracuse University. Active in the Engineering Libraries Division of the American Society for Engineering Education, she served as Program and Division Chair. She is the library... Read More →
avatar for Anne Rauh

Anne Rauh

Head of Collections and Research Services, Syracuse University Libraries
Anne E. Rauh is the Head of Collections and Research Services at Syracuse University Libraries. She leads the collection activities, the subject liaison work, and the university aligned research initiatives of the Libraries. She holds a B.A. in International Studies and a M.A. in... Read More →



Wednesday November 7, 2018 3:40pm - 4:20pm EST
Pinckney Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

3:40pm EST

Discovering the Library and the Librarian in Science Textbooks: Representations and Implications
College textbooks introduce students to the scope and methods of inquiry in a particular discipline and in that context also discuss library research. This paper will report the results of a project that investigated how introductory science undergraduate textbooks represent libraries and librarians as well as the related information/research concepts of peer review, primary literature, secondary literature, scientific literacy, and scientific method. This study involved three stages: (1) identifying and collecting the textbooks used in introductory physics, biology, and chemistry undergraduate courses; (2) identifying textbook components that discuss library research and related concepts and then using qualitative coding to analyze these components for tone, coverage, scope, etc.; and (3) examining the results in context of library information literacy program goals and implications for textbook publishers and authors. Results indicate both commonalities among the disciplines as well as some interesting differences. Libraries, librarians, etc. are mentioned more often than one might think but, ultimately, not as often as one might hope. The paper will highlight implications for undergraduate student perceptions of the value of academic libraries and implications for faculty-librarian collaboration.

Speakers
avatar for Jenny Bruxvoort

Jenny Bruxvoort

Graduate Student, U of IL Urbana
avatar for Paige Dhyne

Paige Dhyne

Graduate Student, U of IL Urbana
Science communication, science literacy as information literacy, open access, open science, STEM librarianship
avatar for Lisa Hinchliffe

Lisa Hinchliffe

Professor/Coordinator for Information Literacy Services and Instruction in the University Library, University of Illinois



3:40pm EST

Inform and Engage your Campus with The New York Times
Sponsored by The New York Times.

Add relevance to curriculum and connect concepts to reality with the unparalleled news coverage and award-winning interactive media stories of The New York Times.  Provide your community with a vibrant daily record of history in the making that serves today’s educational ideals by impelling critical thinking, global awareness, information literacy, and civic engagement.  Times content helps students and people understand the changing cultural, social, scientific, and political challenges around the world. This presentation will cover our institutional site license program for academics and libraries, highlight features and benefits of nytimes.com, and review NYT InEducation curated-educator resources that connect The New York Times content to specific areas of study.

Speakers
KR

Kandace Rusnak

Director, Education B2B, The New York Times
avatar for New York Times

New York Times

The New York Times
The New York Times is a global media organization dedicated to helping people understand the world through unrivaled, expert, and deeply reported independent journalism and innovative storytelling.

Sponsors
avatar for The New York Times

The New York Times

The New York Times is a global media organization dedicated to helping people understand the world through unrivaled, expert, and deeply reported journalism and innovative storytelling.


Wednesday November 7, 2018 3:40pm - 4:20pm EST
Gold Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel

3:40pm EST

Library Space Transformed
Academic libraries are increasingly emphasizing spaces that support integrated learning experiences and enhanced patron study areas. Designing and creating these spaces significantly impacts their print collections and library leaders need context to inform the full range of collection management decisions: retention, storage, withdrawal, sharing, and digitization.

During this session, presenters will introduce factors impacting the analysis and assessment of collections when libraries are required to reduce those collections. They will share their experiences in managing their collections by outlining a plan to systematically weed the collections, the tools used to assess the collection, including commercial and home-grown approaches, criteria used to review the collections, and the options subject librarians have to discard, place items in storage, or participate in a shared print group. They will also discuss options provided to university faculty to virtually or physically review materials proposed for deselection and procedures used for staging and handling the large quantity of items being evaluated.

Attendees will learn how to evaluate their collections within the context of available space, user needs, and resource rarity on a global scale. They will also hear about common barriers to deselection and shared print projects and will receive best practices to overcome these issues.

Speakers
avatar for Matt Barnes

Matt Barnes

Director, Sustainable Collection Services, OCLC
Matt has been working in the academic library community since 2002 and has held senior-level positions at Blackwell Book Services, ebrary, and ProQuest. He is particularly interested in transforming data into insights that help libraries advance their mission.
JD

Jee Davis

Associate University Librarian for Collections and Stewardship, Villanova University
avatar for Jared Howland

Jared Howland

Collection Development Coordinator, Brigham Young University
Jared Howland has worked at the Brigham Young University library since 2003 and is currently the Collection Development Coordinator. Prior to that, he worked as the Collection Assessment Librarian, Head of Catalog Services, and Electronic Resources Librarian at BYU.
avatar for Wen-Ying Lu

Wen-Ying Lu

Head of Cataloging, SANTA CLARA UNIVERSITY
Wen-ying Lu is the Head of Cataloging at Santa Clara University (SCU) Library. She manages a unit responsible for cataloging, database maintenance and firm-order acquisitions. Prior to SCU, Lu was the cataloging librarian at San Mateo County Libraries, continuing resources catalog... Read More →
RS

Rebecca Schroeder

Material Acquisitions Department Chair, Brigham Young University


Wednesday November 7, 2018 3:40pm - 4:20pm EST
Colonial Ballroom, Embassy Suites

3:40pm EST

Managing donations when you are out of space, time, money, and staff
Library donations and how we handle them are approached in a variety of ways, reflecting differences in policies, workflows, and designated resources. Handling gifts, and the entire process from initial contact with a donor to the item’s final destination, may feel like chasing windblown leaves in Autumn or receiving free kittens. This session will engage the audience in lively discussion and problem-solving exercises designed to spark ideas for dealing with such acquisitions. As examples, the presenters will use their home institutions as case studies for assessing donation workflows and policies.

The Allen Music Library at Florida State University is a separate library housed in the College of Music complex. Being administratively separate from our main campus library, we accept and process all incoming music donations. Some are automatically integrated into the General and Special Collections, while others are evaluated for our annual book sale. Within one fiscal year we took in over 10,000 general items as well as a special jazz collection totaling at least the same number of items. All are valuable to our collection in different ways, but they have also stretched a limited staff and reconsideration of our donation policy is necessary for the future.

The University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point has a single academic library. In one year, our library can receive more gift items than it does purchase requests. These materials seldom match in value, with gifts ranging from pristine to old materials. One recent gift collection was an exception, with us adding hundreds of items directly to our collections, while offering an equal number of items to other campuses. With tightening budgets and reduced staffing, our workflows remain challenged. We’ve worked to find an equilibrium by updating our policies and placing an emphasis on institutional giving, recognizing the importance of foundational donations and endowments. Finally, we’ll consider our ongoing Library Book Sales of unneeded gifts and weeded collections, and our partnering with Better World Books and the Wisconsin Nicaragua Partnership, which have an impact on global literacy.

Speakers
avatar for Sara Fay

Sara Fay

Florida State University
avatar for Tom Reich

Tom Reich

Acquisitions, Gifts, & Collection Development Coordinator, University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point
Collection Development Coordinator & Head of Acquisitions, Gift Librarian. Professor, Reference and Instruction Librarian. Liaison to History, International Studies & Peace Studies, Political Science, and Military Science.


Wednesday November 7, 2018 3:40pm - 4:20pm EST
Salon II, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401, USA

3:40pm EST

Negotiate as if your library depends on it
In a world, with decreasing library budgets and ever-increasing subscription prices, the need for specific negotiation skills have never been more present. With the right negotiation competences, you will see a shift of leverage to your side of the table when dealing with vendors.
The session will provide you with an understanding of both classical and new theories of negotiation tactics and tools. Starting with the basics of negotiations it will evolve into concrete examples, and best practices learned from consortia and libraries in 5 different continents.
You will learn:
• How to successfully complete a negotiation with a vendor from a-z
• How to swallow your fears and confront your opponent
• Why you should start with “No”
• How to get rid of distractions and be an active listener
• Why the use of “Fair” might be the most important word for libraries to learn
• How to cleverly navigate the transition from subscription licensing to Open Access

At the end of the session, you will even get some methods on how you can increase your salary and maybe even get your manager to fight your case in the organization.

Speakers
avatar for Rick Burke

Rick Burke

Executive Director, SCELC
A long-time attendee of the Charleston Conference, I lead SCELC, a library consortium based in downtown Los Angeles. Since SCELC is very active in licensing e-resources I have spoken at past pre-conferences on negotiation and on e-resource management. I enjoy talking about consortia... Read More →
avatar for Tejs Grevstad

Tejs Grevstad

Co-Founder, ConsortiaManager
Creator of ConsortiaManager and most recently the 2. generation ERM tool ROAM Plus (www.roam.plus), described by library leaders as the first ERM tool ever that actually helps with handling workflows and decision support.Curious to meet and talk about everything from OA, Open Science... Read More →


Wednesday November 7, 2018 3:40pm - 4:20pm EST
Grand Ballroom 2, Gaillard Center

3:40pm EST

Open Access Books: The 2018 Progress Report.
The presentation will look at recent developments around Open Access books in core markets globally. A special focus will be on the development of funding sources as well as business models, both by traditional publishers and by startups in academic publishing.

Speakers
avatar for Sven Fund

Sven Fund

Managing Director, Knowledge Unlatched
I am passionate about making Open Access work for both publishers and librarians.


3:40pm EST

Open Letter(s) on Open Access
A project this summer, funded by a grant from the University of Chicago, will have produced an examination of a set of well-regarded academic sources with an eye towards their sustainable accessibility. The set of sources examined will include various paths that authors choose in the hope to share their works with others, including gold OA, green OA, hybrid options, uploading to academic social media sites, deposits to institutional repositories, etc. This assessment will then be shared as an open letter. This project will produce a set of procedures and plans such that anyone else interested in educating researchers/scholars about how to publish in a way that assures sustainable accessibiity can follow-suit.

We will be soliciting from the audience ideas for ways in which they and others can replicate this process thereby educating whole groups of academics on issues related to Open Access.

Speakers
avatar for Ingrid Becker

Ingrid Becker

PhD Candidate (English Literature), University of Chicago
avatar for John G. Dove

John G. Dove

Consultant and Open Access Advocate, Alzora
I’m the former CEO of Credo Reference, and before that president of Silverplatter. I am now a consultant to the publishing and library worlds specifically in areas related to Open Access. I won't take on any clients that aren't working to accelerate the transition to a fully... Read More →



Wednesday November 7, 2018 3:40pm - 4:20pm EST
Ashley Room, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

3:40pm EST

Publishing Community Efforts and Solutions to Mitigate the Risks Sci-Hub Poses to Researchers, Librarians and Publishers.
Now more than ever the publishing and library community are facing threats of digital piracy. What can we do to minimize or possibly eliminate these infractions? A discussion about the collective efforts of publishers, libraries, and other organizations will cover how to protect electronic resources, personal data, and adopting best practices in order to survive in a world of hackers, thieves, and phishing attempts. We will address how these attacks can occur, what steps you can take to protect your library, and examples of other librarians that have had success in implementing these solutions.

Speakers
avatar for Juan Denzer

Juan Denzer

Discovery Services Librarian, SUNY Oswego
Juan Denzer is the Discovery Services Librarian at SUNY Oswego. He earned his MSLIS IN 2017 from the University at Buffalo, has a B.S. in Computer Sciences from Binghamton University. He is the author of a LITA Guide entitled: Digital Collections and Exhibits. He is also has written... Read More →
avatar for Sari Frances

Sari Frances

Mgr. of Digital License Compliance, IEEE
With over 15 years experience in the publishing industry, Sari Frances, Manager of Digital License Compliance, has successfully managed IEEE’s IP Protection Program since 2008. IEEE is the world’s largest organization dedicated to advancing technology for humanity. Sari’s responsibilities... Read More →
avatar for Don Hamparian

Don Hamparian

SR Product Manager, OCLC
Don Hamparian manages EZproxy and identity management at OCLC. He is responsible for product strategy and direction for products and software that protect and provide access to OCLC’s services. With a degree in industrial engineering from The Ohio State University and several years... Read More →
avatar for Crane Hasshold

Crane Hasshold

Director of Threat Intelligence, Phishlabs
Crane Hassold is the Director of Threat Intelligence at PhishLabs based out of Charleston, SC, where he oversees the Research, Analysis, and Intelligence Division (RAID). Prior to joining PhishLabs, Crane served as an Analyst at the FBI for more than 11 years, providing strategic... Read More →


3:40pm EST

Putting Our Values Into Action: Integrating Diversity, Inclusion, & Social Justice Into Collection Management and Technical Services
Providing diverse collections is a long-standing commitment of libraries. Today, more than ever, there is a greater sense of urgency about and increased scrutiny of this commitment. Are academic libraries making a concerted effort to collect diverse topics and viewpoints? Are they providing the necessary tools to advocate for social justice? Our panel will discuss different approaches to evaluating current collections and methods for creating collections that promote diversity and social justice.

We present four perspectives:
1. Michelle Baildon, MIT: Michelle describe the impact of a 2017 academic library’s task force report on diversity, inclusion, and social justice in collections-related work. Michelle will iinclude a discussion of specific collections strategy projects designed to manifest these values in monograph acquisitions and print storage projects.
2. Rachel Finn, Vassar College – Rachel will speak specifically to early stage efforts to integrate the values of social justice into the day-to-day work of technical services. She will discuss the process, the short-term goals, and talk more about their aspirations for bringing real change to existing department workflows.
3. Becky Imamoto, UC Irvine - Becky will discuss her library’s experience in evaluating their current collection for diversity using different data points. This project highlighted gaps in the collection and led to additional purchasing strategies. The library also created a new way to display these recent titles to the user population.
4. Jenny Hudson, GOBI Library Solutions: Jenny will explore how vendors can help libraries both in reviewing their current profiles/collections and in building a more diverse collection moving forward. She will also speak to how library projects can help to influence vendors to integrate diversity, inclusion and social justice into their services.

Speakers
avatar for Michelle Baildon

Michelle Baildon

Collections Strategist for Arts & Humanities, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)
RF

Rachel Finn

Social Sciences Librarian, Vassar College
JH

Jenny Hudson

Senior Collection Development Manager, GOBI LIbrary Solutions
avatar for Becky Imamoto

Becky Imamoto

Head of Collection Strategies, University of California, Irvine



Wednesday November 7, 2018 3:40pm - 4:20pm EST
Colonial Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel

3:40pm EST

Simplifying the collections budget to maximize flexibility and increase responsiveness to user needs
This session will consider management of the collections budget via fund structures. A common approach in collections budget management is to distribute allocations via format (e.g. monograph and serials), and subject areas. While tracking spending at a granular level provides more information, it also generally results in a large number of funds. As more and more materials are purchased in consortial packages or other types of “big deals”, or are simply interdisciplinary in nature, the allocation and expenditure on specific and narrowly defined funds begins to become inaccurate and less useful. In this session, two large ARL libraries describe their experiences reviewing and revising their budget structures for resources in order to focus greater time and effort on priorities that meet user community needs and university-wide priorities.

In this presentation, two case studies will illustrate the benefits of following an approach to reduce fund structures with the goal to simplify processes and maximize flexibility of the budget, while increasing responsiveness to user needs. The University of Alberta will explain how they significantly reduced reliance on a large number of fund codes over a 5 year period beginning in 2012 and currently have completely eliminated subject-based funds. The University of Washington initiated a multi-year process in the fall of 2017, and in the first year is simplifying and reducing the number funds for ongoing serials costs. Both will describe the concerns raised, challenges of implementing such a change, and how a simplified structure has been beneficial for how collections and acquisitions work.

Speakers
avatar for Denise Koufogiannakis

Denise Koufogiannakis

Associate University Librarian, University of Alberta Libraries
avatar for Denise Pan

Denise Pan

Associate Dean, Collections and Content, University of Washington Libraries



Wednesday November 7, 2018 3:40pm - 4:20pm EST
Grand Ballroom 3, Gaillard Center

3:40pm EST

Skipping the Hurdles: Fast Track Article Access for Researchers
The demand for unfettered access to full content continues to grow. Modern researchers are accustomed to moving from a results list to the full web page or content with a single click. Library discovery and delivery systems and publisher platforms fail to deliver the ease of access that users expect. Once users successfully clear hurdles created by proxy-based authentication and unfamiliar library discovery interfaces they face a variety of Full Text link options that provide inconsistent results, may require a bit of hunting and several clicks, and, with luck, arrive at a full PDF of an article.

Improving consistency and reducing the number of clicks are essential steps to improve user experience. The presenters discuss three approaches to get users from a result to full text quickly and with enhanced functionality. Athena Hoeppner will explore techniques to optimize link resolver functionality to deliver one-click access to full text and to highlight relevant library services. Ben Kaube and Jason Chabak will talk about Kopernio and Access Anywhere, two next generation tools for one-click PDF access, organization, and storage.

All three approaches will improve article access UX. Kopernio and Access Anywhere bring additional, relatively new, capabilities to the table, offering researchers greater control and stability for their selected PDFs and providing new usage analytics to libraries. The audience will gain an understanding of the capabilities and limitations of the three approaches and some insights into how they would benefit their own libraries and researchers.

Speakers
avatar for Jason Chabak

Jason Chabak

Director of Institutional Sales & Business Development, ReadCube
avatar for Athena Hoeppner

Athena Hoeppner

Discovery Services Librarian, University of Central Florida Libraries
avatar for Ben Kaube

Ben Kaube

Co-founder, Kopernio (Clarivate Analytics)



3:40pm EST

Sudden Collections Coordinators: When you don’t know what you don’t know
As new librarians enter the profession with varying levels of education and experience concerning library collection management they may find themselves suddenly assigned the responsibility of coordinating collection activities within a subject area or for their entire library. From understanding terminology to working with acquisitions departments and from communicating with vendors to assessing resources, there is much to be learned in a short period of time. This presentation will provide perspectives from four librarians at the George A. Smathers Libraries at the University of Florida: the associate dean responsible for collections, the chair of the acquisitions & collections services department, and two relatively new subject librarians who were recently asked to coordinate collection decisions for their respective areas (humanities and health sciences). The two new librarians — one holds a terminal degree in her subject area and the other a recent MLIS graduate, both new to librarianship — who found themselves quickly positioned as mediators between a the acquisitions department and the librarian selectors in their departments. This presentation will address the large learning curve, including the steps of building a strong connection with acquisitions, developing vendor relations, and tracking collection development at the department level, while making suggestions for learning more along the way.

Speakers
MD

Megan Daly

Classics, Philosophy, and Religion Liaison Librarian, University of Florida
avatar for Ariel Pomputius

Ariel Pomputius

Health Sciences Liaison Librarian, University of Florida
Ariel is the point person for collection development in her department in the Health Science Center Libraries. For her personal research, she is very interested in graphic medicine and wellness.
avatar for Patrick Reakes

Patrick Reakes

Senior Associate Dean Scholarly Resources & Serv, University of Florida
avatar for Trey Shelton

Trey Shelton

Chair, Acquisitions & Collections Services, University of Florida, George A. Smathers Libraries



3:40pm EST

Supporting Open Education with the Wind at Your Back: Lessons for OER Programs from the Open Textbook Toolkit
What does it take to move open education from idea to practice? In this session we will lead a discussion about what supports instructors need to engage with open education and how we can make adoption and adaptation easy and inviting. We’ll set the stage with an overview of findings from our IMLS-funded research (LG-72-17-0051-17) on the needs and practices of psychology instructors for adopting or creating open textbooks and OER. We’ll then share some lessons on what faculty say they need and where they feel we can do better, as well as offer some insights, from our research, on student needs and desires in learning resources.

Next, we’ll open up a conversation about how transferable these lessons are and the unique needs of other academic communities. How might libraries and presses view open differently? What lessons for support can small liberal arts colleges offer to large research-focused universities? How can we translate the work done by commercial entities around OER to academic and not-for-profit organizations S? Whether it’s a last mile problem or your first step into support for a new program, you will leave this discussion with some new ideas, example, and allies to support OER.

Speakers
avatar for Will Cross

Will Cross

Director, Copyright and Digital Scholarship Center, NC State University Libraries
I'm excited about the relationship between copyright, student agency, and open culture. Recently I've been focused on the Library Copyright Institute, the Open Pedagogy Incubator, the Scholarly Communication Notebook, and the Best Practices for Fair Use in Open Education... Read More →
avatar for Erica Hayes

Erica Hayes

NCSU Libraries Fellow, North Carolina State University Libraries
avatar for Mira Waller

Mira Waller

Department Head, Research Engagement, Libraries, North Carolina State University


3:40pm EST

Transfer Turns Ten: the Future of the Code
Libraries, publishers, and intermediary vendors strive to disseminate the most current information to their patrons and clients through the metadata in their catalogs, services, and software. One significant pinch point in this landscape is the transfer of journals from one publisher or vendor to another. The Transfer Code of Practice was created to provide stakeholders in this information supply chain with best practices and guidelines to ensure that the transfer process occurs with minimal disruption and that journal content remains accessible to readers and subscribers. These guidelines have become increasingly important since the creation of the Transfer code in 2008, as the number of online titles, publishers, and supply chain intermediaries has grown exponentially. For these reasons, Transfer is undergoing two significant changes this year as we mark the ten year anniversary of the Code. The current Code of Practice is in its third iteration, which was adopted in 2014; in 2018, the Transfer Committee began revisions for version 4. These revisions will accommodate the changes that have occurred in the journal publishing market, especially changes in technology and terminology. In conjunction with the release of version 4 of the Code, the free online Transfer Alerting Service will be migrating to the ISSN International Centre (Paris, France). This new platform will replace the existing Enhanced Transfer Alerting Service which is hosted and maintained by the University of Manchester (UK). This session will present attendees with an overview of the Code, with a specific focus on new and updated content. Presenters will also provide a demonstration of the new platform, showcase the new and improved features of the service, and explain the process that publishers and librarians will go through to share and access Transfer information.

Speakers
avatar for Jennifer Bazeley

Jennifer Bazeley

Coordinator, Collection Access and Acquisitions, Miami University (OH)
Jennifer Bazeley has a BM and an MM in viola performance from the Eastman School of Music and an MLIS from Dominican University in Illinois. Her love of serials and electronic resources started with a student job in the DePaul University Library in Chicago, IL. Since completing her... Read More →
avatar for Gaelle Bequet

Gaelle Bequet

Director, ISSN International Centre
Dr. Gaëlle Béquet was appointed director of the ISSN International Centre in March 2014. She began her career as an ICT specialist with the French Ministry of culture and communication. She has held leading positions in various academic libraries. She received a PhD in Information... Read More →



Wednesday November 7, 2018 3:40pm - 4:20pm EST
Laurens Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King St, Charleston, SC 29403, USA

3:40pm EST

Why IP-based access is failing end users: How to give patrons a simple, seamless user experience
Many publishers and librarians continue to offer IP-based access to digital content because they perceive it to be the easiest way for students and researchers to get to what they need. But this insecure method of accessing resources gives patrons an inconsistent experience on and off-site and makes it more difficult for them to set up personalisation features such as saved searches, favourites and recommended content.

Federated access management offers one of the best ways to access subscribed digital content, but poorly designed publisher and library platforms continue to create barriers to successful access.

This session will:

* Describe some of the barriers patrons experience when discovering and accessing subscribed online content
* Address some of the trust-related questions access management federations get asked around what user data is passed to publishers, why it's needed and how user privacy is preserved
* Provide guidance from the RA21 initiative and highlight the work of InCommon and OpenAthens to improve user access
* Outline the quick wins librarians and publishers can implement now to increase user satisfaction and engagement with subscribed digital content
* In an open Q&A, answer questions from participants that are still using IP-based access and what their concerns might be around changing to a federated access management solution.

The objectives of this session are to:
1. Discuss the trust-relationship between publishers, libraries and their users and the challenges around access management federation services
2. Raise awareness of some of the issues around IP-based access and poorly designed platforms
3. Appraise participants of the recent work of InCommon and OpenAthens to alleviate some these pain points
4. Provide guidance on what librarians and publishers can do now to improve patrons' discovery and access to subscribed digital content based on recommendations from the RA21 initiative.

Speakers
avatar for Phil Leahy

Phil Leahy

Service Relationship Manager, OpenAthens
I've seen OpenAthens grow from an access management service exclusively serving the UK academic community, to a set of products and services used in more than 50 countries by over four million users working and studying in academic, healthcare, government and commercial organisations... Read More →
KW

Keith Wessel

Identity and access service manager, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and member of InCommon Technical Advisory Committee
Keith is a member of the identity and access management team in campus IT at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. He's the lead service manager for the campus's Shibboleth identity provider and the Shibboleth and federation expert for the three campuses in the University... Read More →



Wednesday November 7, 2018 3:40pm - 4:20pm EST
Grand Ballroom 1, Gaillard Center

3:40pm EST

Words into Action: Building an Open Access Ecosystem
Pioneering libraries and publishers are collaborating to pilot the next stage(s) of our paradigmatic shift to an Open Access ecosystem of scholarly research. MIT is working with the Royal Society of Chemistry and the 10 campuses of the University of California are in discussions with several publishers about piloting offsetting agreements in the US market to begin in 2019. These are critical steps forward in transforming scholarly publishing to Open Access models, with the understanding that moving to full Open Access is a shared goal. These libraries are taking bold steps forward to jointly explore opportunities for transitioning to sustainable open access business models with publishers who are ready to make these changes.

Speakers
avatar for Ivy Anderson

Ivy Anderson

Associate Executive Director, California Digital Library
Ivy Anderson is the Associate Executive Director and Director of Collection Development at the California Digital Library (CDL), where she oversees a broad range of shared collections activities on behalf of the ten campuses of the University of California system. Before coming to... Read More →
avatar for Katharine Dunn

Katharine Dunn

Scholarly Communications Librarian, MIT Libraries
avatar for Sybille Geisenheyner

Sybille Geisenheyner

Sales Manager (Europe, Middle East, India & Africa), Royal Society of Chemistry
Sybille oversees Europe, Middle East, Africa & India in her role as Sales Manager for the Royal Society of Chemistry. During her twenty years in the industry, Sybille has worked for organisations such as SilverPlatter, Walter de Gruyter, Thomson Reuters and WoltersKluwer. She is involved... Read More →
avatar for Rice Majors

Rice Majors

Associate University Librarian, UC Davis



Wednesday November 7, 2018 3:40pm - 4:20pm EST
Calhoun Room, Francis Marion Hotel

3:40pm EST

Stopwatch Session
These short “pecha kucha-like” sessions will feature five PowerPoint presentations of 6 minutes and 40 seconds each. We will have time at the end of the session intended for Q&A for all presenters. Come for a lively, rapid-fire group of talks.

1) Liaising the Liaison: A Newbie’s Approach to Challenge Assessment Resistance (Brianne Dosch, University of Tennessee)
Academic liaison librarians hold nuanced, varied, and numerous responsibilities throughout their libraries and institutions. These responsibilities are difficult to capture in traditional reporting structures, which can lead to siloing, workplace tension, and resistance to library-wide assessment efforts. One library answered this challenge by giving the opportunity to develop meaningful liaison assessment to a practicum student. This stopwatch session will explore this newbie’s approach to navigating institutional structures, inter-department relationships, and gaining buy-in from librarians and administrators alike. All while coping with being viewed as the “inexperienced outsider” and own personal insecurities. Some takeaways include: finding the courage to take on projects you might not feel qualified for, discovering what you may have to offer as a library “outsider,” and learning how to forge meaningful relationships with librarians at all career levels throughout the library.

2) Thirty Days and Counting: Conducting Effective Product Trials for Library Resources (Edward Lener, Virginia Tech; Tracy Gilmore, California State University)
Product trials for evaluating potential new resources can be a challenge for any library. To be most effective, several key elements must be addressed including determining suitable trial dates, establishing and confirming access, creating appropriate links, publicizing product availability, collecting usage data, and gathering feedback from participants. If one or more of these steps is missed it is all too easy for trial access to run out before much useful data is gathered. The University Libraries at Virginia Tech have developed a method for managing this process through a trials workflow team and using free, web-based project management software from Trello. This session will convey some of what we have learned about conducting product trials for library resources and ways to make the most of the limited time available. Attendees will learn about our workflow for conducting trials, see examples of the software and checklists we use, and discover how we work with our vendors to better manage the process for product trials.

3) The Carpentries: Teaching data science skills to researchers and people working in library- and information-related roles worldwide (Chris Erdmann, Data Carpentries)
 In July 1998, Los Alamos National Laboratory hosted the very first Carpentries course, led by John Reynders, Brent Gorda, and Greg Wilson. After running several courses thereafter, the lessons they learned highlighted the growing demand from the research community for training in basic computing skills and that traditional educational opportunities did not entirely address these needs. Fast forward to 2018, there continues to be a tremendous demand from the research community to learn new computational approaches and improve their workflows leading to the growth of The Carpentries. Since 2012, The Carpentries has seen 58 Trainers badged and 1,480 Instructors certified who have taught 1,332 Carpentries workshops reaching over 37,000 learners in 44 countries. This talk will describe what we teach, why and how we teach it, the impact it's having, and what we're planning to do next.  

4) New Standards for Quantitative Usage Reporting – COUNTER Release 5 (Lorraine Estelle, COUNTER) 
COUNTER reports provide consistent, credible and comparable insight into database, ebook, journal, chapter, and article usage. They are an industry standard for measuring and evaluating a subscription and library’s value to faculty, and at the beginning of 2019 are changing to the new COUNTER Release 5 Code of Practice. This session, led by Lorraine Estelle, Project Director, COUNTER will build upon the presentation given at last year’s conference about Release 5. Attendees will learn about the improvements that Code of Practice 5 provides over previous releases, what these mean to collections, acquisitions, e-resources or administrative professionals. This is an essential session as Release 5 standards include new Master Reports, Metric Types, Attribute Types, SUSHI Standards and Reporting Configurations, which next year will become the de-facto standard for usage reporting.

5) A Statistical Story: Using LibInsights for Budgeting and Collection Development (Barbara Hilderbrand, Seminole State College of Florida) 
Our Library has compiled usage statistics on a variety of resources in a variety of formats for a number of years. The statistics have been housed in shared spreadsheets across Library personnel. Like many other Libraries we’ve faced budget cuts in recent years while needing to increase services.  We needed to build a narrative that would  accurately represent our budgetary concerns to administrators.

LibInsights has provided an excellent solution for us. It’s provided a mechanism for housing all of our data. It is extremely difficult to compare apples to oranges but necessary when they are paid for out of the same budget. We’ve used this tool to streamline our data collection process. To consistently gather the same type of stats for the same type of resources. Then to compare the different types of formats and subject specific resources to make collection development and budgetary decisions.

Moderators
avatar for Courtney McAllister

Courtney McAllister

Library Services Engineer, EBSCO

Speakers
avatar for Brianne Dosch

Brianne Dosch

Research Assistant - Recent Graduate, University of Tennessee
avatar for Chris Erdmann

Chris Erdmann

Library Carpentry Community & Development Director, The Carpentries
avatar for Lorraine Estelle

Lorraine Estelle

Project Director, COUNTER
Lorraine Estelle is the COUNTER Project Director. Launched in March 2002, COUNTER (Counting Online Usage of Networked Electronic Resources) is an international initiative serving librarians, publishers and intermediaries by setting standards that facilitate the recording and reporting... Read More →
avatar for Tracy Gilmore

Tracy Gilmore

Librarian, CSULB
avatar for Barbara Hilderbrand

Barbara Hilderbrand

Manager, Library Resources & Digital Services, Seminole State College of Florida
avatar for Edward Lener

Edward Lener

Associate Director for Collection Management, Virginia Tech
Edward Lener is Associate Director of Collection Management in the University Libraries at Virginia Tech and College Librarian for the Sciences. Edward is the university's representative to the Collections Committee of the VIVA library consortium and a co-author of the book Graduate... Read More →



Wednesday November 7, 2018 3:40pm - 4:20pm EST
Salon I, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401, USA

4:40pm EST

Are Economic Pressures on University Press Acquisitions Quietly Changing the Shape of the Scholarly Record?
The monograph remains central to humanities and qualitative social science research and the form most important to the tenure process. But the future of the form is uncertain. University and other scholarly presses have played a vital role in supporting the publication of scholarly monographs, in particular the all-important first book. While good data on the subject is not easy to gather, evidence points to an erosion of traditional revenue streams for monographs that have not yet been replaced by new funding models. The average scholarly monograph is not recuperating its costs. For decades, library purchasing supported the form. With library budgets tightening and new collecting strategies gaining hold, the scholarly monograph would appear to be no longer sustainable via a sales model inherited from the print context.

Recent research has addressed the impact of cooperative library purchasing, the role of American university press publishing in shaping the monograph, the effects of new business models and approaches to access, and the costs of producing scholarly monographs. Yet there is a gap in the literature where the beginning meets the end: If the monograph remains central to tenure, but is increasingly financially burdensome, will presses stop acquiring them? One possible outcome, as sales of copies per title decline, is a transition in presses’ acquisitions approaches from a focus on shepherding individual books to a drive for quantity. Another possibility is a shift toward a list aimed at a larger, less specialized readership at the expense of the monograph. And presses are experimenting with up-front subventions that may cover publishing costs while also allowing open access distribution.

This session will present preliminary data from a longer-term study on university press acquisitions trends, how and why they matter. Discussion will draw on the interconnected perspectives of library, aggregator, and press stakeholders.

Moderators
avatar for Meg White

Meg White

Director, Technology Services, Rittenhouse Book Distributors, Inc.
Meg White is a 25-year veteran of the health sciences publishing industry. Her background includes various sales, marketing, and product development positions at Rittenhouse Book Distributors, Mosby, Williams & Wilkins, and Wolters Kluwer Health/Lippincott Williams & Wilkins. She... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Emily Farrell

Emily Farrell

Sales Manager, Northeast, De Gruyter
NK

Nicole Kendzejeski

Associate Director, Project MUSE, Johns Hopkins University Press
avatar for Mahinder S. Kingra

Mahinder S. Kingra

Editor in Chief, Cornell University Press
KW

Kizer Walker

Director of Collections, Cornell University Library


Wednesday November 7, 2018 4:40pm - 5:25pm EST
Grand Ballroom 3, Gaillard Center

4:40pm EST

Hiring for Sustainable Disruption
As we gear towards building the libraries of the present and the future, we look for staff who bring with them a new set of skills and abilities. We often intentionally look outside our library ecosystem for IT, analytical, or service frameworks which will enables us to diversify our workplace while bringing in fresh ideas and capabilities. We want to work more smartly and we need to find the staff to ensure such progress is made now.

Still, all libraries differ somewhat in the ways by which we plan, select, hire, and retain our most valuable employees. This panel attempts to provide information on institutional and personal differences surrounding our hiring practices in general and in particular as they relate to what we consider a “disruptive” hire. We define disruption in hiring as of strategic value, often found from outside of normal institutional types, boundaries, or skill sets that enables a team, a department, and occasionally even a whole library to increase creativity and innovation. These hires introduce and apply diverse and unconventional ways of thinking which can result in a complete re/engineering of thinking or workflows of a whole service.

Searching, interviewing, hiring, and retaining such employees require our organizations to apply a considerable amount of organizational flexibility in preparing and sustaining one or more disruptive staff members in our hybrid library areas. We already struggle with limited resources and continuous work; how can we adjust salaries, work conditions, and most importantly teams and culture surrounding these hires to integrate them fully while managing and balancing this disruption well?

Panel members, senior administrators in large research libraries, will attempt to shed light on differences in our hiring and retention practices and will share stories of success and failure around this issue.

Moderators
RH

Robert Hollandsworth

Economics, Finance & PRTM Librarian, Learning Commons Coordinator, Clemson University

Speakers
avatar for Peter Bae

Peter Bae

Asst. UL. Scholary Coll. Servs., Princeton University Library
Peter Bae is currently working at the Princeton University Library as Assistant University Librarian for Scholarly Collection Services. He is a member of the ALA RUSA STARS Executive Committee and the International ILL Committee. Peter serves as Secretary of the IFLA Document Delivery... Read More →
avatar for Jesse Koennecke

Jesse Koennecke

Director, Acquisitions & E-Resource Licensing, Cornell University
Ask me about Battledecks@ER&L!
avatar for Boaz Nadav-Manes

Boaz Nadav-Manes

Associate University Librarian for Access Services and Collection Management, Brown University
Boaz Nadav-Manes is the Associate University Librarian for Access Services and Collection Management at Brown University Library. In this role, he oversees the allocation and expenditure of the Libraries' collections budget, and the ongoing management of services and staff that advance... Read More →
avatar for Nina Servizzi

Nina Servizzi

Associate Dean for Knowledge Access and Resource Management Services, New York University
BW

Brad Warren

Associate Dean of Library Services, University of Cincinnati Libraries


Wednesday November 7, 2018 4:40pm - 5:25pm EST
Grand Ballroom 2, Gaillard Center

4:40pm EST

The Scholarly Kitchen Live - Chat With the Chefs
Join us for an interactive discussion with several of the "Chefs" who write regularly for The Scholarly Kitchen (TSK), the blog of the Society for Scholarly Publishing (SSP). This highly-regarded and influential blog serves all segments involved in the scholarly publishing community. Founded in 2008, the blog is read by thousands of publishers, editors, librarians, researchers, and publishing service providers in more than 200 countries each day. TSK has more than 8600 subscribers to daily content alerts and more than 14,700 followers on Twitter. In this Q&A session, the Chefs and audience members will discuss “What keeps publishers and librarians up at night?,” highlighting the most pressing issues facing those working in scholarly communications today. Bring your questions and expect a lively conversation!

Speakers
avatar for Lettie Conrad

Lettie Conrad

Product Research & Development Affiliate, Maverick Publishing Specialists
I bring 15+ years publishing experience to my work with a variety of global information organizations and partners, dedicated to advancing knowledge and driving product innovations that ensure positive and effective researcher experiences. As a senior Maverick associate and independent... Read More →
avatar for David Crotty

David Crotty

Editorial Director, Journals Policy, Oxford University Press
David Crotty is the Editorial Director, Journals Policy for Oxford University Press. He oversees journal policy and contributes to strategy across OUP’s journals program, drives technological innovation, serves as an information officer, and manages a suite of research society-owned... Read More →
avatar for Joseph Esposito

Joseph Esposito

Senior Partner, Clarke & Esposito
I am a management consultant working in the area of publishing, especially scholarly publishing, and digital media. I work with for-profit and not-for-profit companies. Most of my clients are CEOs or Boards of Directors, whom I advise on strategy. My aim is to help organizations make... Read More →
avatar for Robert Harington

Robert Harington

Associate Executive Director, Publishing, American Mathematical Society
avatar for Lisa Hinchliffe

Lisa Hinchliffe

Professor/Coordinator for Information Literacy Services and Instruction in the University Library, University of Illinois
avatar for Judy Luther

Judy Luther

President, Informed Strategies
I am a former academic librarian who has worked for publishers and vendors. Since the Internet began, I have consulted with all stakeholders in scholarly publishing, most recently societies whose members are faculty in higher education.
avatar for Alice Meadows

Alice Meadows

Director, Communications, ORCID
 
avatar for Ann Michael

Ann Michael

CEO, Delta Think
Ann Michael is CEO of Delta Think, a consulting and advisory firm focused on innovation and growth in content focused organizations. Ann has worked with clients to help them gain insight into their customers’ needs, define their strategy, build their product and services portfolio... Read More →



Wednesday November 7, 2018 4:40pm - 5:25pm EST
Grand Ballroom 1, Gaillard Center

5:45pm EST

Poster Sessions and Happy Hour Networking
Mix and mingle with other conference attendees over a beverage and a snack while visiting the Poster Sessions and our new Virtual Poster kiosks. Appetizers will be provided and a cash bar will be available to purchase beverages. We will also have a Speed Networking session available in the Calhoun Room nearby to introduce you to a large number of attendees in an efficient and relaxed way. Don't miss it!

Moderators
TG

Tom Gilson

Associate Editor, Against the Grain

Wednesday November 7, 2018 5:45pm - 6:45pm EST
Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel

5:45pm EST

Speed Networking
The speed networking session is designed to introduce you to a large number of attendees in an efficient and relaxed way. This session will allow publishers, vendors, and librarians alike to meet with each other one on one.

How it works: you will have brief 3-minute meetings with attendees at the event (one minute per person and one minute for discussion). These quick meetings are the starting point for conversation and networking throughout the conference and beyond. Make the most out of your conference investment through this unique session.

Speakers
avatar for Matt Branton

Matt Branton

CIO, Against the Grain


Wednesday November 7, 2018 5:45pm - 6:45pm EST
Calhoun Room, Francis Marion Hotel

5:45pm EST

Virtual Posters
The virtual posters are displayed on large flat screen monitors at kiosks with iPads for browsing through the poster selections.  The layout of the display is similar to Netflix, where you can browse by category/topical thread, or search by author, keyword, etc.  Our attendees really loved this interactive way to view content and browse the posters last year, and we're happy to bring them back! The 2018 Virtual Poster kiosks will be located outside the Carolina Ballroom in the Francis Marion Hotel during the poster session on Wednesday, Nov. 7.  Come check it out!

Wednesday November 7, 2018 5:45pm - 6:45pm EST
Outside Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel

5:45pm EST

01 Benchmarking the Value of Business Research: The University of Minnesota Libraries’ Model
description of the session
How can a publicly-funded research library leverage growing resource demands within an increasingly tight investment landscape? By telling compelling stories about how faculty and students from across colleges utilize (need) business resources and tools for their entrepreneurial work. Tableau Desktop and Server helps library decision makers organize and visualize the wealth of local data to build a case for future investments.

The use case of the Carlson School of Management illustrates lessons we learned:
• identifying key metrics—money saved by students; books and journals most downloaded or cited by faculty; market share of the college reached by the library
• integrating data from multiple sources—enterprise systems, publishers, software vendors
• creating a discipline-specific profile of use reveals research patterns needed to inform strategic decisions on database selection and service delivery

objective of the session
Show attendees how they can use Tableau to create simple but effective visualizations that illustrate the stories of faculty / student growing demand for access to and understanding of tools needed to conduct entrepreneurial work. With this actionable data our business librarians can more effectively work with users to address emerging venture development needs.

ways of including the audience
Identify the business librarian who can address audience questions about disciplinary needs, and the dashboard creator who can address their Tableau authoring questions. Two laptops will be available to let the audience interact with the visualization or see how the dashboard was created in the desktop client.

what attendees can expect to learn
The many options for authoring Tableau visualizations and making them available.
The different kinds of data available in most academic library environments to tell stories about users.

Speakers
MS

Mary Schoenborn

Liaison to Carlson School of Management & Humphrey School of Public Affairs, University of Minnesota
JS

Jim Stemper

Organizational Data Strategist, University of Minnesota


Wednesday November 7, 2018 5:45pm - 6:45pm EST
Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel

5:45pm EST

02 Buy Wisdom or Borrow It?
This poster will present the findings of a study on demand-driven acquisition (DDA) ebooks at a federal research library. Examining the books that have been selected for perpetual access due to DDA use, is subsequent usage by customers commensurate with the cost of the purchase? Would other, newer models, such as short-term loans or access-to-own, better meet the needs of the library’s customers and its budget, or do the usage patterns of these books show it is more cost-effective when the library provides perpetual access?

Speakers
avatar for Stacy Bruss

Stacy Bruss

Collection Services Coordinator Librarian, Boulder Labs Library
I am a brand-new (started June 2018) collection services coordinator at the Boulder Labs Library. We support three agencies: NOAA, NIST, and NTIA on the same campus in Boulder, CO. I come to this position with ~10 years of reference librarian experience with an emphasis on analysis.My... Read More →


Wednesday November 7, 2018 5:45pm - 6:45pm EST
Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel

5:45pm EST

03 Corralling Data for Collection Decisions
Subject liaisons and research librarians know multiple metrics and qualitative inputs are required to assess the full value of a given electronic resource, particularly within the context of a library’s entire collection. This session will outline how our library is incorporating both usage statistics provided by vendors and peer institution comparisons in a Sharepoint-based invoice tracking system. We will also describe how we are mining faculty requests, interlibrary loan data, chat transcripts, and other reference/research inquiries as we strive to develop a consistent and simple, yet comprehensive, method for evaluating not only existing resources, but also potential new purchases and subscriptions.

Speakers
SF

Susan Finley

Business Librarian, University of Louisville
LR

Latisha Reynolds

Humanities and Social Sciences Librarian, University of Louisville


Wednesday November 7, 2018 5:45pm - 6:45pm EST
Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel

5:45pm EST

04 Data Analytics for Acquisitions Reports
A poster displaying the steps for generating reports on staff work outputs using data analytics, in this case ExLibris Alma analytics. Library operations staff and managers will benefit from learning how to expose hidden work that doesn't show up in standard library metrics reporting. Various reports will be displayed along with steps performed in creating them from initial idea to execution.

Speakers
avatar for Jeffrey Sowder

Jeffrey Sowder

Head Order Services & Acquisitions, Emory University
Jeffrey Sowder is Head of Order Services at Emory University Robert Woodruff Library. Jeffrey serves on the Advisory Committee of ALA Office for Diversity, Literacy, and Outreach Services (ODLOS). He served as Chair of ALA GLBTRT Rainbow List Committee and was Chair of the ALA GLBT... Read More →



Wednesday November 7, 2018 5:45pm - 6:45pm EST
Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel

5:45pm EST

05 DDA Triggers: Are We Hitting Our Collection Targets or Our Vendors Sale Targets?
Adelphi University Libraries started an ebook Demand Driven Acquisitions (DDA) program with ebrary in January, 2014. After one short term loan a second use triggered a purchase. This trigger was determined by an analysis of how ebooks were used in the subscription component of ebrary, Academic Complete. Titles were added to the pool according to our slip plan profile with YBP. Librarians could also manually add ebook titles to the DDA pool.

To see if our trigger point should be adjusted for our current DDA with ProQuest Ebook Central, I pulled statistics from the ebrary administrative portal for January, 2014 through January, 2017 that show the use of items after they have triggered a purchase. My analysis covers the subsequent use of items that were triggered for purchase; the value of the DDA program compared to if we had purchased the ebooks outright; the value of including publishers such as Wiley that do not allow short term loans in a DDA program.

With the use of other Adelphi ebook usage stats my assessment also covers the value of this DDA program for ebooks compared to the usage of ebooks in our subscription database and our firm ordered ebooks. In this context I also consider what benefits accrue to publishers in supporting DDA programs for ebooks as opposed to other acquisition and access models.

Speakers
avatar for Debbi Smith

Debbi Smith

Professor, Collection Strategies Librarian, Adelphi University
Collection assessment, statistics, ebooks, budgeting, knitting


Wednesday November 7, 2018 5:45pm - 6:45pm EST
Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel

5:45pm EST

06 We can't always get what we want, but if try some data, we might get what we need!
Are you awash in order data? This major ARL library has a long history collecting purchase data by discipline and publisher, circulation data, online use data, evidence based data, demand driven orders and use data. After several years of pilot programs and in looking at the most important academic books bought and used over five years from several angles - we merged it all. We combined that with user surveys and vendor plans to overhaul and automate book buying. The problems are many: fewer staff and fewer dollars, less shelf space, a large student population, and bibliographers too taxed for time to do title orders and an unpredictable book-publishing world. The goals: get users what they want and when they want it while making the best use of our time and collection dollars.
The poster traces our data collections, analysis and final morphing into a coherent plan to automate more shipments and expand multiple demand driven plans with cost containment built in and anticipating users’ needs for print or e formats. We can’t always get what we want… but we can spent some time and use data to get what we need!

Speakers
avatar for Stephanie Baker

Stephanie Baker

Library Information Systems Specialist, University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign
GG

George Gottschalk

Acquisitions Operations Specialist, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
avatar for Lynn Wiley

Lynn Wiley

Head of Acquisitions, University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign


Wednesday November 7, 2018 5:45pm - 6:45pm EST
Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel

5:45pm EST

07 Identifying Errors in Periodical Holdings Statements: How AUL Improved Its Outdated ILS Records
The ever-increasing availability of and demand for e-content has complicated libraries’ internal records and muddied their understanding of their subscription details and holdings. Adelphi University Libraries' technical services unit realized its catalog data had drifted significantly and no longer reflected actual periodical holdings or online access entitlements. The acquisitions librarian and her staff examined vendor-supplied subscriptions details, improved their catalog records, and documented new workflows.

Speakers
avatar for Sandra Urban

Sandra Urban

Assistant Professor, Acquisition Strategies Librarian, Adelphi University Libraries


Wednesday November 7, 2018 5:45pm - 6:45pm EST
Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel

5:45pm EST

08 ‘Scrumming’ the Library Materials Budget Allocation: A Serendipitous Application of an Agile Project Management Framework
At George A. Smathers Libraries at the University of Florida, employees are increasingly utilizing project management (PM) tools to accomplish their daily work. After being introduced to Agile Project Management and its methodologies, members of the Accounting and Serials (A&S) Unit realized that many of their daily practices for materials budget management mirrored those of the Scrum framework of Agile, such as time boxing, incremental releases, ceremonies, and core principles.

The A&S Unit within the Acquisitions and Collections Services Department is responsible for managing the libraries’ materials budgets. Developing the annual materials budget allocation is an extensive process that begins in November/December with a rough estimate derived from prior-year final expenditure figures. As the year progresses and expenditure commitments increase, the allocations estimate becomes more precise and it culminates after a successful completion of the budget rollover.

This poster describes the methodology used last year by the A&S Unit to derive the annual materials budget allocation, and the serendipitous realization that their practices matched many of the project management elements of the Scrum framework. A visual comparison of the A&S Unit practices and the Scrum framework will be presented.


Speakers
avatar for Raimonda Margjoni

Raimonda Margjoni

Accounting Manager, University of Florida
I have worked in a variety positions at the University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries since 1999. Currently, I am the Accounting & Serials Manager of the Acquisitions & Collections Services Department. In addition to planning and coordinating the Libraries’ materials budget... Read More →
MM

Michelle McClure

Accounting Coordinator, George A. Smathers Libraries at the University of Florida
Michelle is a library materials budget coordinator for the University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries, where she has served in various roles within Acquisitions and Collections Services since 2011. Prior to UF, Michelle worked in the Financial Services industry in New York... Read More →


Wednesday November 7, 2018 5:45pm - 6:45pm EST
Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel

5:45pm EST

09 Do We Really Know What They Know? Designing a Survey to Find Out What Subject Bibliographers Actually Understand about Acquisitions
A monograph/firm order manager, an e-resources expert and a technology infrastructure specialist walked into a break room… No great jokes were born that day, but a survey was. These three acquisitions employees at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign sat down to figure out, “How much do bibliographers actually know and understand about our work?”

Acquisitions staff in libraries pride themselves on serving as a key intersection point between bibliographers, vendors and publishers, business office staff, and library service constituencies. Communication is critical, and in theory, all parties understand the need for clarity and mutual understanding. In practice, however, acquisitions staff often respond to bibliographer inquiries with language steeped in assumptions about terminology and consequent ramifications. Sometimes these assumptions lead to miscommunication and disappointment.

As libraries continue to grapple with the need to craft effective strategies across print and electronic ownership purchases, demand-driven and evidence-based models, and leased/subscription models, it is more imperative than ever that bibliographers understand nuances of these overlapping approaches. Impacts include access and long-term availability, as well as implications for budget planning and projections. Bibliographers, in turn, field questions from researchers, for example, when access to a given resource disappears.

This poster session will articulate the process of developing a survey to assess and evaluate what bibliographers understand about acquisitions processes. The poster will outline the key issues identified by acquisitions staff in developing the survey and the implications for bibliographer understanding, and contextualize these against the existing trends in acquisitions and collection development as governed by the current market purchase models for library resources.

Speakers
avatar for Stephanie Baker

Stephanie Baker

Library Information Systems Specialist, University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign
GG

George Gottschalk

Acquisitions Operations Specialist, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
avatar for Christopher Morgan

Christopher Morgan

E-Resources and Acquisitions Support Specialist, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign


Wednesday November 7, 2018 5:45pm - 6:45pm EST
Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel

5:45pm EST

10 Doing the Math – discovering infinity transitioning monograph standing orders from print to online and deriving a variable formula for success
In retrospect persuading the Math faculty at the University of British Columbia (UBC) of the value in switching their beloved monograph series from print to online format was a breeze. The tough part came in making this pledge a reality.

As with most academic institutions, the pursuit of online collection options is a logical objective, to help meet the demands of reduced space for print resources and the desire to provide access to more content to a broader range of users. Although stalwart defenders of the importance of print and physical proximity to their collections, the Math faculty at UBC were won over by arguments of greater discoverability, findability and access. In making our case, we knew that the series in question were available electronically, what we didn’t fully realize is they become different entities when they go digital.

Unlike journals, in this publishing domain, electronic subscriptions or standing orders are not the norm. This immediately raised questions about ensuring continuous and stable funding for materials that were no longer ‘serial’ but rather monograph, a budget sector with historically less protection. We discovered that every series had a different publishing and pricing model – though the majority involved delayed online publication release and higher costs ranging from 10% to 75% per volume. Contemplating the logistics of acquiring as annual electronic backfiles within our fiscal year, or monitoring approval slip plans for title by title selection quickly demonstrated that the process wasn’t adding up to a balanced equation in terms of cost or workflow efficiency. Further complicating the mix was the inclusion of some series in one of our EBA plans. What should have been a welcome relief and easy win, became a sober second thought as the evidence showed the content was not being accessed, hence a challenge to the principle of purchasing based on user demand.

This session explores the logistical and financial issues to consider in making existing ebook purchase models work for our circumstances, and is of interest to librarians and publishers involved in mathematical ebook collections.

Speakers
MI

Mayu Ishida

Reference Librarian, University of British Columbia
KM

Kat McGrath

Collections Librarian, University of British Columbia



Wednesday November 7, 2018 5:45pm - 6:45pm EST
Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel

5:45pm EST

11 Exploring Avenues to Help Health Science Students with Textbook Access via the Library’s Electronic Resources
Facing the high cost of textbooks, many universities are exploring how to lower student textbook expenses. Hence the appearance of Open Education Resources (OER), Inclusive Access (IA) and other means to help students with textbook access.
Many health science libraries have been researching emerging and alternate avenues for providing textbook access to their users, including OER, IA and using LibGuides, etc.
This poster discusses how to provide “free” textbooks to health science students by using the library’s existing electronic resources and resources demanded by faculty. The authors use several methods to identify the best books for students: 1. Using Doody’s Core Titles, a health science book review service, to identify health science books from the existing electronic resources; 2. Discussing with faculty about whether we already have the books they need; 3. Suggesting alternative books to faculty to use as textbooks; 4. Purchasing unlimited copy licenses of ebooks that are available to libraries to meet faculty demands for textbooks. The textbooks are then put on LibGuides by course or subject for students. As a result, health science students may take advantage of the library resources to reduce their expenses for textbooks. At the same time, it is a great way to promote library resources.

Speakers
avatar for Robert Britton

Robert Britton

Electronic Resources/Collection Development Librarian, University of South Alabama
JL

Jie Li

Assistant Director for Collection Management, University of South Alabama


Wednesday November 7, 2018 5:45pm - 6:45pm EST
Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel

5:45pm EST

12 From Every Angle: In-Person Fruits of Worldwide Collaboration
This poster session describes how the Albert R. Mann Library at Cornell University collaborated with the Biodiversity Heritage Library (BHL) to create a digital collection of rare books and journals on the theme of apples and cider during Cornell Reunion 2018. Attendees will learn how on-the-ground exhibits and activities can be transformed and promoted online while leveraging the collection strengths of other institutions.
BHL is a consortium of natural history and botanical libraries that cooperate to digitize the literature of biodiversity held in their collections, making it freely available as a part of a global “biodiversity commons.” Staff from Mann and BHL created “Pomology: Apples and Cider” with two dozen of Cornell’s finest rare pomological titles digitized for the collection. Other titles in the ~22,000 page collection were scanned from the collections of libraries at NC State, U. California, Library of Congress, NY Botanical Garden, National Agricultural Library, Prelinger Library, Boston Public, Chicago Botanic Garden, Harvard, UMass Amherst, U. Toronto, Missouri Botanical Garden, Smithsonian and the Wellcome Library.
Working closely together, staff from Mann and BHL planned the event from every angle to create in-person experiences on campus as well as virtual experiences worldwide. This effort brought together exhibits (physical and virtual), a lecture by a leading expert on cider apples (streamed live on Facebook and archived online), a cider tasting event, a detailed BHL blog post on a selected historic title and online highlights via Flickr, Twitter, Instagram and Tumblr. The fruits of this collaboration were increased interest in the collections, wider exposure and greater networking opportunities for researchers and cider enthusiasts, and more awareness of the rich, deep collections offered for free via the Biodiversity Heritage Library’s collection and mission to the public – an ideal match for the mission of a Land Grant institution library such as ours.

Speakers
avatar for Michael Cook

Michael Cook

Head of Collections, Mann Library, Cornell University
Digital collections, digital preservation, Land Grant libraries, open access, special collections.


Wednesday November 7, 2018 5:45pm - 6:45pm EST
Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel

5:45pm EST

13 If Distance Learning Degrees Come, Can Funding be Far Behind?
In 2015 Abilene Christian University started an extension campus in the Dallas/Fort Worth area with fully online doctoral and master's programs being offered and support requested from the Abilene campus with exisiting resources and no requests for additional funding. This poster discusses the story of how the Library navigated the process of leveraging our materials budget to develop a partnership with our extension campus to create a blended funding model with formalized roles and documenting common actions that led to increased support for the library from the university and greater accountability for our resources and services to distance learning students.

Speakers
avatar for Mark McCallon

Mark McCallon

Associate Dean for Library Information Services, Abilene Christian University
Library Administration, Open Access Policies, Distance Education



Wednesday November 7, 2018 5:45pm - 6:45pm EST
Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel

5:45pm EST

14 If You Build It, They Will Come: Creating a New Online Purchase Request System on the Cheap
In early 2017, Thomas Cooper Library’s seventeen year old home-grown online purchase request system ceased functioning. The online purchase request system supports workflow management of faculty and patron monographic order requests by Collection Development, Acquisitions, and Library Liaisons. While traditional monographic order workflows and support are often thought of as legacy services, the need to effectively and efficiently manage these requests has never been more pressing. Evidence based acquisitions, patron driven acquisitions, and approval plans cast a wide net, addressing broad based collection building. Faculty and patron driven title-by-title monograph requests represent unique purchases that directly support teaching and research while promoting library-campus community relationships. The demise of our old system provided us the opportunity to reflect on library-wide change in the intervening seventeen years, how we position this service throughout the library, and the requirements needed in a new system to address our current and future needs. With both a commercial and University IT built software solution out of financial reach, we set about building our own system using library IT resources. Join us as we discuss how we went from a deceased seventeen year old system to a scalable ticket-based solution that elegantly addresses staff and community needs. We will share the experiences and challenges we encountered as we travelled this path including: how we isolated our essential system requirements, how that process helped us define our software solution, what resources were required to undertake this project, what we’ve learned, and how our journey can be adapted by other libraries.

Speakers
avatar for Christee Pascale

Christee Pascale

Head of Acquisitions, University of South Carolina
SS

Shanna Schaffer

Collection Development Librarian, University of South Carolina - Columbia


Wednesday November 7, 2018 5:45pm - 6:45pm EST
Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel

5:45pm EST

15 It will work: adapting a weighted allocation formula for a different climate
Libraries are increasingly asked to justify every part of their spending. Such justification is easier if we can show evidence that our purchasing is tied to multiple measurable data
points. This session will look at the implementation of a weighted allocation formula for acquisitions at a small, underfunded public college.

For years, the library had been setting yearly allocations using an average of historical spending plus a small percentage to cover inflation, which was then tweaked based on liaison input. After attending a session at a previous Charleston conference, we decided to adapt the models that we saw to our own, unique situation. We developed a statistically-driven formula using data such as circulation, enrollment, and cost of materials which we feel has resulted in a more equitable and user-focused allocation model.

The presenter will address the impetus for our change in practice, details of the model, considerations that went into it, results to date, and future plans. 

Speakers
avatar for April Davies

April Davies

Head of Technical & Public Services, SUNY Cobleskill



Wednesday November 7, 2018 5:45pm - 6:45pm EST
Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel

5:45pm EST

16 Melting Away: Sifting through the Special Snowflakes
This presentation is co-authored by Marlena Barber, Assistant Director of Collections and Historical Services , East Carolina University, who was unable to attend the conference.

Medical practice books tend to become quickly outdated as clinical practice changes with ever-evolving research. For the past few years, Laupus Health Sciences Library has been ordering eBooks in addition to ordering books in print. Over time, the library has experienced a shift in increased eBook acquisitions versus print. At the same time, we have been deaccessioning outdated print monographs. Print book usage at Laupus Library has seen a decline since 2012, whereas eBook usage has experienced a large increase. Total book expenditures indicate a higher overall spend in print materials than electronic since 2012. Year to year collections expenditures have decreased overall for monographic materials with more of the budget emphasis placed on print formats, but recent years have shown an increase in eBook purchasing over print books. This presentation examines monograph expenditures and usage for the past six years at our library and implications for the future of our collection development practices.

Speakers
MI

Megan Inman

Collection Development Librarian, East Carolina University


Wednesday November 7, 2018 5:45pm - 6:45pm EST
Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel

5:45pm EST

17 Perceived Gender Issues in Library-Vendor Negotiations
Diminishing acquisition budgets, big deal break-ups, and rising inflationary costs make negotiations between librarians and vendors even more important. With a review of the literature and a short survey among peer institutions, this brief study looks to investigate if there is a perceived gender-bias in vendor-librarian negotiations.

While there is a lot in the literature about negotiation and the principles thereof, there hasn't been very much written about the role of gender in librarian-vendor negotiation. I wanted to investigate this more thoroughly, but more, I wanted to look at the perception of gender in these negotiations. In my own experience, there are expectations around gender in the negotiation process, and I have observed certain behaviours during my years working with vendors and I wanted to find out if others have observed the same behaviours. The survey and literature review helped with that, and with a co-presenter who is a vendor, we are sharing two perspectives that are similar yet we are coming from different places. Presenting will give us the opportunity to share the results of the survey and hopefully begin a dialogue with others to determine if there is any real basis to the perceptions and if so, what we can begin to do about changing those perceptions and perhaps changing the overall experience. This presentation offers more questions than answers, but I hope it will be interesting!

Speakers
avatar for Anne Cerstvik Nolan

Anne Cerstvik Nolan

Collection Strategist, Brown University
Anne has been at the Brown University Library for 26 years, first as Assistant Head of Reference and Head of Interlibrary Loan. Along the way, someone realized that all of the eresources work she had been doing (in addition to the other two jobs) was really a full-time job, and so... Read More →
AT

Amy Thurlow

Regional Manager, EBSCO Industries, Inc.
Amy Thurlow has been with EBSCO Industries Inc for over thirteen years during which she has primarily been in a sales role working directly with clients within the library to negotiate pricing, contracts, and terms for databases and software. She is familiar with working with individuals... Read More →


Wednesday November 7, 2018 5:45pm - 6:45pm EST
Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel

5:45pm EST

18 Charles VR: A Virtual Reality Reconstruction of the Coronation Mass of Emperor Charles V in Bologna in 1530
Charles V|R is a virtual reality reconstruction of the coronation of Holy Roman Emperor Charles V in Bologna, Italy, in February of 1530. The details of his coronation reflect the social and political turmoil of the times. Charles V|R is a recreation of the sights and sounds of this religious and political ceremony using contemporaneous accounts, artwork, and music as source material. Complete with direct access to the scholarly and archival sources that informed our choices, Charles V|R offers enthusiasts of art, architecture, history, music, religion, and virtual reality as well as students and scholars of those disciplines a multi-modal window into an event of world-historical importance.

Experience the event from multiple perspectives — that of member of the imperial/papal court, a basilica official, or a Bolognese citizen. Hear music performed during the ceremony. Call up scholarly annotations to explore the layers of meaning embedded in the art, architecture, and various ceremonial objects present.
The event itself was very significant. This was the last time an emperor was crowned by a sitting pope in the manner of Charlemagne’s coronation by Leo III in the year 800 — a ritual that had been emulated for 730 years. Amid increasing power of the Ottoman Empire to the east, the subjugation of the New World to the west, and the rise of Protestantism within Europe itself, the political situation was delicate: Charles could not be crowned in Rome, because Protestant German mercenaries he employed had sacked the Eternal City three years earlier. This context informed the planning and execution of the ceremony, which had to conform to tradition but also reflect the political realities of the day. The result is a product that conveys for the user much more than reading a prose narrative could: a visual, aural, and spatial experience of the event itself.

Speakers
TL

Tom Lee

Greenhouse Studios Design Technologist, University of Connecticut
TS

Tom Scheinfeldt

Department Head & Assoc Prof, Digital Media and Design, University of Connecticut
avatar for Michael Young

Michael Young

Humanities Librarian, University of Connecticut
Michael Young is an art librarian and art historian, who works and teaches at the University of Connecticut. As a librarian who is also a heavy user of the library's collections as a researcher and an instructor in Art History, he approaches image databases and other library resources... Read More →


Wednesday November 7, 2018 5:45pm - 6:45pm EST
Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel

5:45pm EST

19 User Engagement with Area Studies Collections in the ReCAP Shared Collection
In September 2017 the ReCAP Consortium, whose members are Columbia University Libraries, Princeton University Libraries and The New York Public Library, launched the Shared Collection, successfully transitioning from joint management of an offsite storage facility to joint stewardship of a shared collection. The Shared Collection allows for greater collaborative collecting and contributes new technology and policy models for the national network of shared print repositories. More immediately, it has also made millions of additional items available for next-day delivery to patrons of each partner institution -- more than seven million additional items each. These collections are also available for same-day electronic document delivery service to affiliated patrons at all institutions, including the 2 million cardholders of the New York Public Library.

Previous talks given on the project have focused on the policy, operational and access aspects of the partnership’s transition. This presentation will focus instead on the implications of the Shared Collection for the libraries’ researchers, introducing perspectives and practices around changing service models in the era of shared print. Because foreign language scholarly monographs and serials are typically low-use materials, they make up a substantial portion of the collective holdings at the ReCAP facility and are therefore a convenient case study. The analysis will focus on usage of the shared area studies holdings, drilling down into detailed usage data at each of the institutions and shedding light on researcher behavior in a seamless shared print environment.


Speakers
avatar for Melissa Gasparotto

Melissa Gasparotto

Assistant Director, Research Services, The New York Public Library Research Libraries


Wednesday November 7, 2018 5:45pm - 6:45pm EST
Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel

5:45pm EST

20 Using a community of practice approach to transform: How an academic library collections unit re-organized to meet growing demands for e-resources and services during a time of institutional change.
In recent years, acquisitions and collection management at the University of South Florida (USF) Library was operating with uncertain budgets, downsizing staff, and suffered a loss of institutional knowledge and skillsets. The dynamic research and learning environment at USF was characterized by growing patron needs for diverse electronic resources. In response, library administrators implemented a strategy of organizing technical services staff into a community of practice with three key elements. The three elements included redefining job descriptions, creating new operational workflows and building new work areas. This poster illustrates how the collections department at USF was re-cast by modifying staff organization and associated work spaces into collaborative teams. The team approach has focused skills sets on multi-format collection problem solving and enhanced service delivery to library patrons. The re-organization has transformed a department previously centered on processing print publications to a department focused on managing diverse activities including evidence-based acquisitions programs in both e-book and streaming formats as well as diverse e-journal and database subscriptions. Poster session attendees will learn strategies on how to re-frame academic library technical service staff organizations and associated operations during times of change. The information also contributes to the body of research in library space planning by presenting operational aspects of academic libraries often only occasionally portrayed in the scholarly literature, yet integral to library wide collaborative efforts in offering services and facilitating collections.

Speakers
JA

John Abresch

Coordinator of Collections, University of South Florida
John Abresch is an Acquisitions/Collections Librarian in the Academic Resources Department at University of South Florida Library. John’s professional responsibilities are with acquisitions functions as well as engaging in collection planning activities. His research interests... Read More →


Wednesday November 7, 2018 5:45pm - 6:45pm EST
Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel

5:45pm EST

21 What are they actually reading? And what can we do with this knowledge?
Librarians are to be good stewards of the money they spend, and select relevant books - books that will get read. Using a technique called Use Factor analysis, librarians can determine, down to specific call numbers, what subjects in the collection are actually being checked out by students, and where checkout patterns indicate heavy use. By targeting these areas of high use for additional purchases, the available money can be spent on material that supports student interests and research. At the same time we avoid buying in areas which see little or no circulation. This presentation will explain what the Use Factor is, how to calculate it, and how to interpret the data provided by the analysis & make useful recommendations.

Speakers
avatar for Robert Weaver

Robert Weaver

Collection Management Librarian, Liberty University
We get a ridiculous amount of donations. I get to sort them all out. I am an Orthodox Christian Deacon.I'm branching out into freelance book indexing.I'm a short story writer and roleplaying adventure writer.


Wednesday November 7, 2018 5:45pm - 6:45pm EST
Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel

5:45pm EST

22 Creating an ebook revolution through training
The benefits of e-books in academic libraries, most notably unnecessary physical storage and greenhouse gas reductions, cannot be overlooked. What’s more, e-book functionality provides users with 24-hour remote access, the ability to annotate and search full text, as well as some accessibility tools unavailable through print. Though e-books have many benefits to libraries, there is still some resistance to them. Attitudinal barriers are not the only issue associated with e-book usage in academic libraries. The literature reveals that many users are unaware that their libraries provide e-books or do not know how to find them. The literature also states that users may have misconceptions about e-books and/or may not understand how to exploit them effectively. It is not enough to acquire e-books if users cannot find them or are resistant to using them. Suggestions that users may benefit from more detailed instruction that will enable them to effectively find e-books, understand their access options, and exploit the platform functionality are frequently encountered in the LIS literature. This poster presentation will provide a summary of the most recent literature on e-book attitudes, and usage to illustrate the current perceptions and status of the format among academic library users. By starting with the literature, I will be better positioned to explain why I believe e-book literacy is an effective tool in combating possible resistance and lack of knowledge and ability in using e-books. It is also my intention to share our experiences providing e-book training to campus members. I will provide examples of the methods of instruction we have made available at our institution, including face-to face class visits; a face-to-face faculty workshop; vendor specific e-book libguides; and institutionally customized video tutorials.

Speakers
avatar for Sophie Rondeau

Sophie Rondeau

Assessment & E-Resources Program Analyst, VIVA
electronic resources, e-book research, OER, meditation, Argentine tango


Wednesday November 7, 2018 5:45pm - 6:45pm EST
Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel

5:45pm EST

24 Navigating the Integrated Library System Transition - How Can a Vendor Alleviate the Pain?
Are you in the process of or planning to move to a new Integrated Library System (ILS)? Did you know your vendors work with customers daily providing support and transition services? Do you know how to efficiently and effectively handle the transition? Are you asking the right questions? Learn from your peers how they effectively worked with their Vendor to develop a “roadmap” and prepare for a smooth transition. Discover why and how your serial and book vendors should participate in the planning process and provide support when switching from one ILS to another. Learn what information your vendors need to know in order to support a successful migration.

Speakers
avatar for Jonathan Blackburn

Jonathan Blackburn

Senior Product Analyst, OCLC
Jonathan Blackburn came to OCLC 8 years ago from Florida State University, where he graduated with his MLIS and also worked as the Web Services Librarian for several years.  He began his tenure at OCLC before WorldShare had even launched and has managed the Acquisitions component... Read More →
avatar for Anne Campbell

Anne Campbell

Library Automation Manager, EBSCO Information Services
avatar for Katy Gabrio

Katy Gabrio

Associate Library Director, Macalester
MP

Matthew Payne

Serials Services Specialist, Ilah Dunlap Little Memorial Library - Univ. of Georgia


Wednesday November 7, 2018 5:45pm - 6:45pm EST
Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel

5:45pm EST

25 Reimagining Research Services’ outreach to faculty and students: a tale of two research departments
Two academic Research Managers will discuss innovative outreach strategies that they coordinate in their respective libraries to support faculty/student success.

At UCF, Subject Librarians reach out to their faculty to help them design “Research Intensive” courses and identify “Textbook Alternatives.” They also identify customized resources to support interdisciplinary Faculty Cluster initiatives and grant-seeking research faculty. Subject Librarians also send their faculty discipline-specific e-newsletters and congratulatory emails for various successes.

Some UCF Subject Librarians have been given “engagement assignments” whereby they coordinate outreach to targeted student constituencies such as First-Time-In-College Students, Transfer Students, Honors in the Major Students, Undergraduate Research Students, International Students, and Graduate Students.

Other UCF student outreach strategies include planning engaging library programs (celebrating Total Eclipse-of-the-Sun and Mars-viewing, Day of the Dead, Earth Day) and ensuring high attendance by inviting faculty to bring entire classes.

FGCU Library’s Student Engagement Committee sponsors board game nights, an escape room, and National Novel Writing Month activities. “Library Ambassadors” (graduate and upper division students) connect with their peers by participating in instruction sessions, Mobile Librarian, and Reference Desk services.

FGCU Subject Librarians reach out to faculty by adding a Research Guide for every course in their Canvas LMS, sending e-newsletters, honoring Faculty Authors, and purchasing textbooks for courses with the largest DFW rates and largest student enrollment.

Program attendees will be encouraged to ask questions and share ideas from their own institutional perspectives. After participating in this program, attendees will be able to develop winning outreach strategies to support faculty and student success in their own institutions.

Speakers
avatar for Linda Colding

Linda Colding

Head, Reference, Research & Instruction, Florida Gulf Coast University
Reference, Research, Mobile Librarian services
avatar for Barbara Tierney

Barbara Tierney

Head of Research & Information Services, University of Central Florida Libraries
Barbara is Head of Research and Information Services for the University of Central Florida Libraries (2013 to the present). She formerly served as the Head of Research and Information Services for the University of North Carolina, Charlotte (2011-2012). Barbara was an Invited... Read More →



Wednesday November 7, 2018 5:45pm - 6:45pm EST
Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel

5:45pm EST

26 When the Wind Blows: Changing Roles for Changing Times
Subject liaisons have traditionally focused on providing services and collections. Recently, however, their roles have shifted from a support model to actively engaging and collaborating with scholars throughout the academic life-cycle and research enterprise. At the same time, users increasingly require functional information support (e.g., for GIS, data visualization, or data mining) in place of or in addition to domain-specific services. As the liaison role continues to evolve, finding the right balance between the roles of generalist, subject specialist, and functional expert will provide both challenges and opportunities.

This poster session will focus on a case study of two librarians who started out in the Collections & Research Strategy department and ended up in a new department, Research Engagement. One librarian transitioned from being a Libraries Fellow into a new role as Research Librarian for Engineering & Entrepreneurship and the other librarian transitioned from being the Associate Head of the Collections & Research Strategy department into being the head of the new department. The librarians will share their perspectives and experiences around helping to shape and form this new department including: building an identity, developing goals and priorities, and figuring out the role of the new department in the organization. The librarians will also share what traditional skills were still needed in their new roles and what strategies were employed for identifying and building new skills.

Speakers
SH

Shelby Hallman

Research Librarian for Engineering & Entrepreneurship, North Carolina State University
avatar for Mira Waller

Mira Waller

Department Head, Research Engagement, Libraries, North Carolina State University


Wednesday November 7, 2018 5:45pm - 6:45pm EST
Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel

5:45pm EST

27 If you build it, will they come? Convincing faculty to utilize the campus repository
Faculty buy-in of an institutional repository can be an uphill battle. Even as IRs become more common and more popular, some faculty may still not understand what it is or how it can benefit them. Other faculty may understand the concept of an IR but might be frustrated by the thought of it being just another administrative task added to their ever-increasing to-do list. The need to educate faculty on why the repository is important and how it can support their pursuit of tenure and promotion goals remains a challenge for most IR administrators. Do you start with the faculty or the administration? Do you try to talk to faculty one-on-one or do you go to department meetings? Can you hold open sessions in the library or other central locations on campus? This poster will address these questions and will provide a framework that you can take back to your campus and use to build rapport with faculty. 

Speakers
avatar for Jennifer L. Pate

Jennifer L. Pate

Open Education Resources (OER) & Scholarly Communications Librarian, University of North Alabama


Wednesday November 7, 2018 5:45pm - 6:45pm EST
Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel

5:45pm EST

28 International Copyright in Historical Context: Who are the real pirates?
Copyright is usually justified with arguments about defending the natural right of authors to control their creations, or claims that limited monopolies spur innovation for the greater good of society. This presentation contrarily asserts that the primary intent of copyright has always been to protect the profits of powerful industries in advanced countries and ensure control over emerging markets that rely on the importation of intellectual property.

As global trade expanded before the 1886 ratification of the Berne Convention for the Protection of Literary and Artistic Works, a patchwork of domestic copyright laws and bilateral treaties failed to stem rampant infringement that hurt publishers' export revenues. Re-printers and readers, however, benefited from lower costs resulting from the absence of financial obligations to foreign rights holders. The United States, in its early years, explicitly limited copyright protection to US citizens. As a result, its publishing industry grew exponentially in the 19th century, largely through cheap reprints of European works. Not until it had itself become a literary power did it finally join the international copyright regime in order to benefit from its protections. In the 20th century, countries such as South Korea, India, and Brazil successfully emulated America's earlier approach to development, but the intensification of restrictions in recent IP treaties such as the TRIPS Agreement and WIPO Internet Treaties now limits this strategy through threats of economic retaliation from dominant powers.

This presentation takes a whirlwind tour through three centuries of international copyright history, challenging dominant narratives about its purpose, beneficiaries and impact on the global public good. In an age where laws have become ever more skewed in favor of owners and against users, alternatives such as Open Access are offered that, in the long term, will facilitate a more equitable distribution of resources in the Knowledge Society.

Speakers
avatar for Paul St-Pierre

Paul St-Pierre

Collections Librarian (Sciences), University of Guelph
Collections librarian for the sciences (agriculture, veterinary medicine, engineering, life & physical sciences). Pragmatic interests include the use of various metrics in making evidence-based collection decisions, as well as improving effectiveness of the interrelated workflows... Read More →


Wednesday November 7, 2018 5:45pm - 6:45pm EST
Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel

5:45pm EST

30 Making data sharing the new normal: progress and challenges
The case for open data to support good research practice is increasingly inarguable. Open access to research data can help speed the pace of discovery and deliver more value by enabling reuse and reducing duplication. Good data practice also makes research more efficient, effective and fulfilling for researchers. A survey conducted in 2017 by Springer Nature with more than 7000 researchers found that, despite the known benefits, there is still a significant proportion of data that is not being shared. The survey explored some of the main challenges for researchers in data sharing, including how data is organised; knowledge of copyright and licensing; knowledge about repositories; time; and costs. This poster will summarize the findings of this survey, and our considered views on increasing data sharing amongst researchers.

Speakers
avatar for Mithu Lucraft

Mithu Lucraft

Marketing Director, Outreach and Open Research, Springer Nature
Mithu Lucraft has worked in academic publishing since 2004. A passion for storytelling combined with a lasting commitment to scholarly communications has led her through a variety of Marketing and Communications roles, including at Oxford University Press, Sage Publishing and Palgrave... Read More →



Wednesday November 7, 2018 5:45pm - 6:45pm EST
Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel

5:45pm EST

31 The Right Growing Conditions: How to Plant an Idea and Nurture it into a Dynamic Collection Development Unit
In 2013, the Kennesaw State University (KSU) Library System hired its first Collection Development Librarian. Since then, the Library System has experienced remarkable changes and growth in many areas, including institutional consolidation, facility renovations, new staffing, and organizational restructuring. Of note is the establishment and extraordinary growth of the Collection Development Unit since 2015. With a good dose of creativity, these winds of change enabled us to grow a seed of potential into a flourishing team. By pulling together talent from other library units and creating positions from the ground up, we were able to blossom into something new.

Within three years of focused and dedicated effort by this highly motivated team, we developed and implemented a broad spectrum of innovative programs and services, including a robust training calendar, comprehensive collection maintenance and assessment plans, a very active undergraduate faculty liaison group, and effective outreach and marketing initiatives with other library units and with the KSU community at large.

Great success never comes easy, and disruptive change is not unfamiliar to libraries. How did we make our case to Library Administration to gain their support, especially when funding and other resources were scarce? What positions were needed the most and what are strategic ways to recruit new team members? How were we going to prioritize the daunting tasks awaiting us? To tackle these inevitable challenges, we employed many innovative strategies and accrued valuable experiences along the way. In this presentation, we will share our best practices in team-building, the unorthodox solutions we came up with, as well as the lessons we learned in the process. We hope that our story will inspire and help you to build an outstanding team that is able to thrive on the winds of change.

Speakers
LA

Laurie Aycock

Government Documents & Collection Development Librarian, Kennesaw State University Library System
avatar for Ana Guimaraes

Ana Guimaraes

Director of Collection Development, Kennesaw State University Library System
Ana Guimaraes is the Director of Collection Development for the Kennesaw State University Library System. She has a Master of Science in Library and Information Science (MSLIS) from Syracuse University and a Bachelor of Arts in Theatre/English from the State University of New York... Read More →


Wednesday November 7, 2018 5:45pm - 6:45pm EST
Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel

5:45pm EST

32 Spotlight your gems: Enhancing unique collections through discovery, access, and digital scholarship
Showcasing a specialized, unique collection in a large, multifaceted library can present a number of challenges for the library staff. The necessities of discoverability, access, promotion, and curatorship require a strategic plan that will support and enhance the smaller collection, yet preserve its distinctive character. Librarians at a large state university in Maryland have met this particular challenge with practicality and creativity. This presentation's goal is to demonstrate how a library can apply this approach to highlight any collection embedded within a larger one.

When Towson University incorporated the programs and faculty of the small, private Baltimore Hebrew University, it also absorbed its library of more than 70,000 volumes into its own. The collection included monographs, periodicals, audio-visual materials, electronic resources, and a rare items collection, comprised of books, manuscripts, and artifacts. Absorbing an entire specialized library collection into a larger diverse one created an opportunity to develop a plan to curate and accentuate it.

The library staff approached this daunting task enthusiastically, employing several methods to manage, improve, and feature this collection. Mindful of both current and potential end users, the staff has taken great care to emphasize discovery and accessibility. The collection provides curriculum support for students and offers extensive research opportunities for faculty and members of the academic community at large. Collaboration with other entities, digital scholarship, and library outreach are important realities for this collection, and each of these has expanded its reach.

This presentation will demonstrate that by focusing on its distinctive content and potential value as a research goldmine, a library can increase a collection’s worth to a wide range of users. It will also provide other library professionals in both academic and public arenas with practical suggestions they can apply to other unique collections found within their own libraries.

Speakers
EM

Elaine Mael

Cataloging Librarian, Towson University


Wednesday November 7, 2018 5:45pm - 6:45pm EST
Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel

5:45pm EST

33 The ERM is Dead. Long Live the ERM!
How do you manage your electronic resources? It's a question libraries have been struggling with for more than a decade, and if you ask a dozen e-resources librarians this question, you'll likely get a dozen different answers. The presenters recently participated in a statewide ERM Working Group, tasked with developing an electronic resource management system as part of the Florida Academic Library Services Cooperative's implementation of the Sierra ILS and Encore Duet discovery platform for the 40 Florida state colleges and universities. While the implementation project ultimately dissolved, the two years put into development were well served. As a group, we were able to design a tool around a diverse set of needs and priorities that could serve local and consortial acquisitions models. We were also able to identify a specific list of needs that lacked currently available solutions. This presentation provides an overview of the Working Group process, from brainstorming through (almost!) implementation, and presents how three university libraries are using the lessons learned from this experience to implement local solutions.

Speakers
avatar for Tina Buck

Tina Buck

Electronic Resources Librarian, University of Central Florida
Serials and database access with some ILS/ERM, cataloging, and acquisitions mixed in. Outside work, I like to cook and bake bread.
EL

Elizabeth Lightfoot

Electronic Resources Librarian, Florida International University
SS

Shelly Schmucker

Electronic Resources Librarian, Florida State University


Wednesday November 7, 2018 5:45pm - 6:45pm EST
Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel

5:45pm EST

34 Utilizing Microsoft OneNote for Transitioning Collection Development and Liaison Duties
When taking over subject areas from one librarian to another, the new specialist, if they are lucky, may receive a folder and/or a thumb drive of some files. If they are very lucky, the interim or outgoing specialist may be available for consultation or leave some type of written narrative to help the new person in learning their duties. The information may be well organized (or not), but thumb drives of individual files and/or paper folders can be cumbersome and lacking in clarity. Organizing things through Microsoft OneNote may be the answer. OneNote lets you organize and share your notes and images as well as embed various Microsoft file formats like Word and Excel. With OneNote, transitions between liaisons can become more transparent because it lets a user demonstrate the thought processes behind decisions well as the final decision itself.

Speakers
avatar for Barbara Bishop

Barbara Bishop

Librarian for Communication, Journalism & Theatre, Auburn University Libraries


Wednesday November 7, 2018 5:45pm - 6:45pm EST
Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel

5:45pm EST

35 Working Toward Yes: creating mutually beneficial license terms
The license negotiation process can be daunting, especially for new career librarians. It requires knowledge of applicable laws in addition to established and upcoming professional standards. With the increased interest in Open Access, licensing librarians are being asked to acquire even more expertise. Just starting a negotiation process can be challenging for organizations with limited staff and funding. But, through knowledge sharing and understanding the vendor's point of view, libraries can create licenses which benefit their patrons and are able to get to "yes" as quickly as possible.

Speakers
avatar for Rachel Becker

Rachel Becker

Copyright and Open Educational Resources Librarian, Madison Area Technical College
Librarian currently at Madison Area Technical College working with Open Educational Resources, instruction, technology, and copyright issues. Advocating for textbook affordability, affordable education, and equitable access.



Wednesday November 7, 2018 5:45pm - 6:45pm EST
Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel

5:45pm EST

36 A Navigation Tool into Unfamiliar Research
Grasp the essence of complex scientific ideas or findings through the synthesis of public references on lead scholarly publications in the field.

Speakers
avatar for Tony Xu

Tony Xu

Co-Founder, Rabbit Hole of Knowledge, STEM Fellowship
I'm a engineering student with a passion for data science and research.Please talk to me about personalized learning and science communication.


Wednesday November 7, 2018 5:45pm - 6:45pm EST
Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel

5:45pm EST

CANCELED: Launching and Scaling your Affordability Initiative - How it was successfully done with OER and Library Content at OhioLINK
Sorry for any inconvenience, but the presenter was unable to attend so this poster session has been canceled.

This session will explain OhioLINK’s affordable learning initiative, information on applying for OER grants, recruiting and engaging a group of faculty and stakeholders, how it was received, tools used for support and lessons learned. OhioLINK partnered with Intellus Learning to help support faculty in discovery and delivery of OER and library content and in this session you will see Intellus Learning and how it can help other schools and/or systems with their A&OER efforts by really leveraging the resources your library already owns and helping to easily get those resources in the hands of all faculty to be able to adopt in their courses to reduce cost for students and increase usage of quality library content across faculty.

Intellus Learning works closely with librarians to help drive usage of valuable library resources that the institution has already paid for:

• Empowers librarians to respond to institutional or state initiatives to improve affordability of course resources
• Combines library content with OER content to give faculty the largest index of resources to choose from.
• Makes library content more easily discoverable and adoptable so faculty can easily search across repositories in correlation to their LO’s to find content to adopt in their course.
• Saves faculty time in discovering high quality, relevant OER and academic library resources
• Provides analytics of Library and OER usage to enable deeper insights into students’ engagement with assigned course content, including library resources.
• Integrates library content with the LMS seamlessly for Single Sign On

Speakers
avatar for Lauren Rose

Lauren Rose

Director of Partneships, Intellus Learning
Affordability, OER, Retention, Student Success and Engagement.


Wednesday November 7, 2018 5:45pm - 6:45pm EST
Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel

5:45pm EST

CANCELLED: Laying the groundwork for a scholarly communications program: Assessing training needs of liaison and graduate librarians
Sorry for any inconvenience, but the presenter was unable to attend so this poster session has been canceled.

The field of scholarly communications encompasses a broad set of services and skills, including publishing, open access, copyright, and research impact. When building a new scholarly communications program, where should a library start? As more libraries step into the foray of scholarly communications services, assessing librarians’ levels of confidence providing these services is pivotal. This presentation will describe how the Kennesaw State University (KSU) Library System conducted an assessment of scholarly communication priorities and training needs of its Undergraduate Liaison and Graduate Librarians in order to guide the development of a scholarly communications program.

In the fall of 2017, the KSU Library System hired a new Scholarly Communications Librarian to build a scholarly communications program on campus. KSU is an R3 Doctoral Institution with an enrollment of approximately 36,000 students on two campuses in the Atlanta metropolitan area. The KSU Library offers two programs to support faculty instruction, collection development, and research – an Undergraduate Liaison program and a Graduate Library program. In order to better understand the current awareness of scholarly communication issues, the KSU Library conducted an assessment of its Undergraduate Liaison and Graduate Librarians.

Utilizing an electronic survey, the Scholarly Communications Librarian assessed KSU librarians’ perceptions of scholarly communications priorities for the campus, the types of scholarly communications services that they are already providing, and their own scholarly communications training needs. During this poster presentation, attendees will learn about the development of the survey method and the results of this assessment and be able to discuss with the author potential scholarly communications initiatives based upon the assessment results.

Speakers
avatar for April Schweikhard

April Schweikhard

Scholarly Communications Librarian, Kennesaw State University


Wednesday November 7, 2018 5:45pm - 6:45pm EST
Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel

5:45pm EST

Excel tips that can be used all year round!
This virtual poster is for novice and frequent Excel users and shares shortcuts intended to make using Excel more productive and spreadsheets more presentable. This poster will demonstrate tips on efficient navigation, formatting, ease in viewing, printing and will give other helpful hints. Examples include keeping headers from scrolling off the screen, removing all blank cells from your ISBN list, globally adjusting column widths, printing column headers on each page, and printing part of a sheet, just to name a few.

Speakers
avatar for Michael Winecoff

Michael Winecoff

Associate Dean for Collection Services, UNC Charlotte
I am currently the Associate Dean for Collection Services and oversee Collections and Acquisitions. Before taking this position I gained valuable paraprofessional experience as a copy cataloger, catalog maintenance coordinator and supervisor of the Accounts Payable and Receiving section... Read More →


Wednesday November 7, 2018 5:45pm - 6:45pm EST
Outside Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel

5:45pm EST

The Game of Open Access - making UK mandates more memorable
The Game of Open Access (OA) is a teaching resource created by library staff at the University of Huddersfield (England) to engage researchers with key concepts & tools required to meet UK OA mandates. Through the use of playful learning, it aims to develop an understanding of the role of Open Access through the initial idea for an article to its acceptance for publication.

Researchers have to consider issues of compliance with funders and governmental requirements when they publish. Once we started looking at the process a researcher needed to follow in order to publish according to the OA mandate for the UK REF, we realized how confusing and complex it was.
How could we make it easier for them to navigate this maze, what is the difference between Gold and Green Open Access, who pays for APCs and does the faculty have an OA policy? There were no clear guidelines on how to manage these OA processes and research support staff were as confused as the researchers themselves!

We developed handouts & a Libguide to promote OA compliancy but it became apparent that our focus needed to shift to engagement so decided to use game based learning to engage our researchers.
In Spring 2017 library staff brainstormed ideas for a board game with 20 questions. Our in-house graphic designer created the visuals & we tested the game before its official outing at the annual Computing and Library Services Showcase in July. Games seem to be a very popular way of disseminating information & encourage understanding & it has been played by researchers and librarians at library roadshows and in OA information sessions.

The game has given library staff the opportunity to help researchers deepen their understanding of OA compliancy & in addition to traditional support, library guides and advocacy, we aim to lighten the stresses of their journey towards publication.



Speakers
avatar for Catherine Parker

Catherine Parker

Collections and Scholarly Communications Librarian, University of Huddersfield


Wednesday November 7, 2018 5:45pm - 6:45pm EST
Outside Carolina Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel

7:00pm EST

Annual Conference Reception
Sponsored by Elsevier
Please wear or bring your conference name badge for admission.

Charleston is well known for its hospitality, and the Annual Reception is a true Charleston affair! The reception will be held at the South Carolina Aquarium. Be entertained by an intimate look at many of South Carolina’s native animals and plants as your journey through the Aquarium takes you from the mountains to the sea. You’ll encounter surprises around every corner and an experience straight from the island of Madagascar is closer than you imagine. The Shark Shallows 20,000 gallon touch tank exhibit will also be open to attendees.

Delicious lowcountry specialties, as well as more familiar reception fare, will be served. Beer, wine, and soft drinks provided at the bar. Live musical entertainment by Ricky McCants and the Catz. We'll also have a photo booth, sponsored by Taylor & Francis, to take souvenir photos with fun props.

Shuttle transportation will be provided. Pick up one of the shuttles at any conference location and let the driver know you wish to attend the reception at the aquarium. We can't wait to see you there!


Sponsors
avatar for Elsevier

Elsevier

Elsevier is a global information analytics business that helps institutions and professionals advance healthcare, open science and improve performance for the benefit of humanity. Elsevier publishes over 2,500 digitized journals, including The Lancet and Cell, more than 38,000 e-book... Read More →


Wednesday November 7, 2018 7:00pm - 9:00pm EST
South Carolina Aquarium
 
Thursday, November 8
 

7:00am EST

Registration Check-in
Please note location: Upper Lobby of the Francis Marion Hotel. Registration NOT AVAILABLE at the Gaillard Center.

Check in upon arrival to receive your name badge and attendee materials. Name badges will be required for entry into conference venues, the reception, and conference shuttles.
The desk will be open the following hours:

Monday, 11/5, 7:00 am - 7:00 pm
Tuesday, 11/6, 7:00 am – 7:00 pm
Wednesday, 11/7, 7:00 am – 7:00 pm
Thursday, 11/8, 7:00 am – 6:00 pm
Friday, 11/9: CLOSED (All registration materials will be moved to the Information Desk on the Mezzanine Level of the Francis Marion Hotel)

Thursday November 8, 2018 7:00am - 6:00pm EST
Upper Lobby, Francis Marion Hotel

7:30am EST

Continental Breakfast
Join us for a light breakfast prior to the morning plenary sessions.

Sponsors
avatar for ATG Media

ATG Media

ATG Media is the group that includes the Charleston Conference, Against the Grain,  a series of short, open access e-books titled "Charleston Briefings: Trending Topics for Information Professionals", and the "Charleston Voices" monograph series.  ATG Media is a wholly owned subsidiary... Read More →


Thursday November 8, 2018 7:30am - 8:30am EST
Outside Grand Ballroom, Gaillard Center

8:30am EST

8:35am EST

Keynote Plenary: Navigating Access to Knowledge: Copyright, Fake News, Fair Use, and Libraries
New technologies have profoundly changed the way content is produced, shared, and disseminated.  Some commentators argue that the ubiquity of digitized content means that libraries have become superfluous in the digital age. This presentation presents evidence to the contrary. It will discuss challenges for libraries arising from globalized copyright, including issues related to fake news and threats to fair use. The presentation will also highlight the strategic ways libraries are being embedded in the design of copyright law nationally and globally, exploring whether these developments – that are sometimes conflicting - are good for libraries and the public in the long term.  

Moderators
avatar for Ann Okerson

Ann Okerson

Senior Advisor, IFLA (International Federation of Library Associations)

Speakers
avatar for Ruth Okediji

Ruth Okediji

Jeremiah Smith. Jr, Professor of Law, Harvard Law School
Ruth L. Okediji is the Jeremiah Smith. Jr, Professor of Law at Harvard Law School and Co-Director of the Berkman Klein Center. A renowned scholar in international intellectual property (IP) law and a foremost authority on the role of intellectual property in social and economic development... Read More →


Thursday November 8, 2018 8:35am - 9:15am EST
Performance Hall, Gaillard Center

9:15am EST

ABC-Clio Vicky Speck Leadership Award Presentation
Vicky Speck ABC-CLIO Leadership Award is awarded every year to a leader in the Charleston Conference who has made a lasting contribution to the Conference’s mission. The award has been granted annually since 2006 – Anthony Watkinson (2006), Jack Montgomery (2007), Beth Bernhardt (2008), Heather Miller (2009), Eleanor Cook (2010), Glenda Alvin (2011), Ramune Kubilius (2012), Audrey Powers (2013), Leah Hinds (2014), Tony Horava (2015), Chuck Hamaker (2016), and Judy Luther (2017).

Thursday November 8, 2018 9:15am - 9:20am EST
Performance Hall, Gaillard Center

9:30am EST

A Spring of Collaboration: A NISO Update of Strategy, Trends, & Industry Collaboration on Discovery & Interchange
Obtain a robust introduction to the work of NISO IDI, the Information Discovery and Interchange topic committee. Representatives from the committee and affiliated working groups will introduce the new 2018 NISO strategy paper and discuss the hot topics that affect our industry and, especially, the discovery landscape. Topics include the discovery of open access material, discovery of non-traditional content-forms, the exchange and quality of metadata, and systems interoperability. Updates will also be provided on some of NISO’s most prominent working groups: the Open Discovery Initiative – promoting transparency in discovery; KBART Automation for the automatic transfer of holdings information into institutional knowledge bases, a soon-to-be-published (and eagerly-awaited!) NISO recommendation; and Transfer, which addresses issues and develops tools related to the movement of scholarly journals between publishers.
 
NISO is where publishers, librarians and software developers come together to discuss trends and needs for collaboration. It provides a forum for creating mutually accepted standards and recommendations. True to this philosophy, we invite you to come to this session, learn about, and discuss existing and emerging needs for collaboration and standards.
 
Transfer is a cross-sectoral NISO Standing Committee comprising representatives from the scholarly publishing, intermediary and library communities. This platform. Transfer is also a forum providing guidance and recommendations to develop specific tools such as the Enhanced Transfer Alerting Service.

Moderators
RH

Robert Hollandsworth

Economics, Finance & PRTM Librarian, Learning Commons Coordinator, Clemson University

Speakers
avatar for Gaelle Bequet

Gaelle Bequet

Director, ISSN International Centre
Dr. Gaëlle Béquet was appointed director of the ISSN International Centre in March 2014. She began her career as an ICT specialist with the French Ministry of culture and communication. She has held leading positions in various academic libraries. She received a PhD in Information... Read More →
avatar for Jason S. Price

Jason S. Price

Director of Licensing Services, SCELC
avatar for Christine Stohn

Christine Stohn

Director Product Management, Ex Libris, a ProQuest Company
Christine Stohn is director of product management for discovery and delivery at Ex Libris. Christine has over 25 years of experience in the library and information industry, having worked on the content and data side before joining Ex Libris in 2001. In her current role Christine... Read More →
avatar for Julie Zhu

Julie Zhu

Senior Manager, Discovery Partners, IEEE
Julie Zhu cultivates and manages effective working relationships with Discovery Service, Link Resolver, Proxy Service and Search Engine providers to maximize IEEE content findability, visibility and accessibility in multiple discovery channels. She serves in NISO’s Information Discovery... Read More →



Thursday November 8, 2018 9:30am - 10:15am EST
Grand Ballroom 2, Gaillard Center

9:30am EST

Blockchain: The Big Picture for Publishing!
Blockchain is a revolutionary technology that has the potential to completely change many industries, including publishing. This session will provide a look into “What is blockchain technology and how could it fundamentally change the publishing industry?”

Dr. van Rossum will provide an overview on the core elements of blockchain technology and why those make it a fit for the publishing industry. He will then look in more detail at blockchain technology and how it could disrupt key facets of the ecosystem from originating, managing and disseminating content, to supporting alternative business/economic models and currencies. Dr. van Rossum will not only look at what is possible but will examine examples of where organizations are already starting to apply blockchain technology.

After presenting this overview, Dr. van Rossum will open the conversation to the floor and drive a lively Q&A session around all aspects of blockchain in publishing.

Moderators
avatar for Anthony Watkinson

Anthony Watkinson

Principal Consultant, CIBER Research

Speakers
avatar for Joris van Rossum

Joris van Rossum

Blockchain Lead, Digital Science
I've been working in scholarly communication for over 20 years, mostly in product development and innovation roles. At Digital Science, I'm researching and working on implementing blockchain in scholarly communication.


Thursday November 8, 2018 9:30am - 10:15am EST
Grand Ballroom 3, Gaillard Center

9:30am EST

Charleston Fast Pitch Competition
Modeled on venture capital funding competitions, the CHARLESTON FAST PITCH COMPETITION will provide two monetary awards of $2,500 to further support the development and implementation of compelling library innovations. Finalists will present their projects to a panel of experts and Charleston Conference attendees for feedback and to determine the two grand prize winners. Come prepared to hear pitches from the four finalists and to vote for your favorite using text message voting.

Judges: Kent Anderson, Jim O'Donnell, and Rebecca Seger.

Finalists:
  • Molly Rainard, Auraria Library
  • Devin Savage, Illinois Institute of Technology
  • Travis Rich, The MIT Press
  • Michael Young, University of Connecticut

International Travel Award Winner: Dr. Sacha Noukhovitch, Executive Director/Editor-in-Chief, STEM Fellowship. Presenting on behalf of STEM Fellowship will be Tony Xu, Co-Counder, Rabbit Hole of Knowledge.

Read more: 

Moderators
avatar for Steve Goodall

Steve Goodall

The Goodall Family Foundation, Founder and President
Stephen (Steve) Goodall is the retired President and CEO of J.D. Power and Associates, a leading market research firm specializing in customer satisfaction and buyer behavior. He started his career at J.D. Power in 1978 and opened the company’s first satellite office in Detroit... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Kent Anderson

Kent Anderson

Chief Executive Officer, RedLink
avatar for Jim O'Donnell

Jim O'Donnell

University Librarian, Arizona State University
avatar for Rebecca Seger

Rebecca Seger

Vice President, Institutional Participation and Strategic Partnerships, ITHAKA


Thursday November 8, 2018 9:30am - 10:15am EST
Grand Ballroom 1, Gaillard Center

10:00am EST

General History and Architecture Walking Tour
Cost: $20 each, cash or check only to be paid at tour time
RSVP

The tours will be led by Carol Ezell-Gilson of Broad Street Biz Walking Tours, and will start and end at Washington Park, 80 Broad Street.
 
The tour gives a general overview of Charleston’s history from the colonial era onward – through the Revolutionary War, the Civil War, to the city’s rediscovery and revitalization of the past 40 years. Participants will gain insight into Charleston’s early wealth and culture, viewing the city’s impressive public buildings and private mansions. Visitors will learn of architectural influences and other factors that resulted in modifications to original structures, with explanation of the single house, the double house and dependencies. (2 hour tour)

Thursday November 8, 2018 10:00am - 12:00pm EST
Washington Park

10:15am EST

Refreshment Break
Thursday November 8, 2018 10:15am - 10:30am EST
Outside Grand Ballroom, Gaillard Center

10:30am EST

Sustainable Open Access Approaches: Benefits for Researchers, Librarians, and Publishers
Article processing charges (APCs) for open access (OA) are continually on the rise. APCs used to be as low as US$500 and now have increased to as much as US$5,000+. Authors are experiencing difficulties receiving OA funding due to the high price of the open access APCs demanded by major publishers and are also having difficulty receiving credit from their institution for their work. Libraries are having difficulties deciphering what OA content is credible and coming from recognized sources. Many small and medium-sized publishers are having to struggle with determining reasonable fees for OA publishing in their publications, due to the costs to produce the work which can be quite high – as for any peer-reviewed book or journal, activities such as a robust peer review process, copy editing/proofreading, as well as the typesetting, online hosting, promotion and distribution of the final contents requires certain human labor and technology support. When the work is published under OA, subscription fees are no longer offsetting these costs, and these publishers are struggling to find another way to subsidize in a manner that can be mutually beneficial to the author, the institution, and to them as the publisher.

Attendees will hear viewpoints from publishers, a librarian, as well as an independent researcher on current challenges and opportunities presented within the OA movement, and ways that everyone can come together to achieve a result that provides credible and trusted publishing outlets for researchers, the highest quality peer-reviewed contents for libraries, an affordable pricing model for APCs, and sustainability for publishers.

A proposed model will be discussed covering how a library’s subscription to publisher contents should offer a waiver for the costs associated with open access APCs for the faculty at the institution subscribing to the contents, along with an engaging Q&A session at the conclusion.

Moderators
avatar for Caroline Campbell

Caroline Campbell

Marketing Manager, IGI Global
Caroline Campbell is currently the Marketing Manager for IGI Global, an international academic publisher. Joining the company in 2017, she is responsible for developing, overseeing, and executing integrated marketing and promotional campaigns and strategies. Prior to IGI Global, she... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Diane Fulkerson

Diane Fulkerson

Director of Library Services, University of South Florida Sarasota-Manatee
This is my 13th year as an academic librarian. I work at small regional campus of USF which is great because it allows me to work closely and get to know our students and faculty. My primary focus is on instruction and the role collections play in helping students improve their research... Read More →
avatar for Julia Gelfand

Julia Gelfand

Applied Sciences & Engineering Librarian, University of California, Irvine
Julia Gelfand has participated in many Charleston conferences for nearly 20 years.  She continues to have interests in many aspects of the library, publisher, vendor triad that shapes collection development decisions and is watching the tides shift with new and emerging technologies... Read More →
avatar for Mehdi  Khosrow-Pour

Mehdi Khosrow-Pour

President and CEO, IGI Global
Mehdi Khosrow-Pour, D.B.A., received his Doctorate in Business Administration from the Nova Southeastern University (Florida, USA). Dr. Khosrow-Pour taught undergraduate and graduate information system courses at the Pennsylvania State University – Harrisburg for almost 20 years... Read More →
avatar for Kevin Sayar

Kevin Sayar

Advisor, ProQuest
Former Co-founder and president of ebrary®, Kevin Sayar led the company from its inception in 1999 to a position as a leading ebook provider to libraries worldwide. Mr. Sayar was instrumental in building the high-growth business through the development of innovative research technologies... Read More →



Thursday November 8, 2018 10:30am - 11:15am EST
Grand Ballroom 1, Gaillard Center

10:30am EST

The Library's Opportunity in Affordable Textbooks
Textbook affordability has become a rallying cry for many in higher education. Parents and students, who are forced to pay for expensive texts, seek relief. Instructors worry that their students often work with textbook copies that are not up to date and even, in extreme situations, forego purchasing a text at all. The question that this panel explores is what role the library community can play in improving textbook affordability.

There have been a number of proposals to lower the cost of textbooks, but two in particular have emerged as strong candidates: open educational resources (OER) and inclusive access. OER bears a strong resemblance to the principles underlying the Open Access movement. Free to access by the user, OER also permits instructors to configure texts for their classrooms. Recently inclusive access has burst on the scene, with report of over 400 U.S. institutions having inclusive access programs in place. In inclusive access, an institution negotiates directly with publishers for deeply discounted digital editions. In some instances those negotiations are being handled by librarians.

This panel covers three areas of textbook affordability: the creation of OER material (Mark McBride), the evaluation of OER materials (Mark Cummings), and a library’s experience in implementing both an OER and inclusive access programs (Gwen Evans). The objective of the panel is to probe the question of textbook affordability and to develop plans for implementation.

Moderators
avatar for Joseph Esposito

Joseph Esposito

Senior Partner, Clarke & Esposito
I am a management consultant working in the area of publishing, especially scholarly publishing, and digital media. I work with for-profit and not-for-profit companies. Most of my clients are CEOs or Boards of Directors, whom I advise on strategy. My aim is to help organizations make... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Mark Cummings

Mark Cummings

Editor and Publisher, Choice (ACRL)
Mark Cummings is editor and publisher at Choice, the publishing unit at the Association of College and Research Libraries. Mark has worked in publishing for over thirty years, beginning his career as a reference editor at Macmillan and serving in a variety of editorial and publishing... Read More →
avatar for Gwen Evans

Gwen Evans

Executive Director, OhioLINK
Executive Director of OhioLINK, a library consortium of 120 higher education libraries and the State Library of Ohio and a division of the Ohio Department of Higher Education. Formerly Associate Professor and the Coordinator of Library Information and Emerging Technologies at Bowling... Read More →
avatar for Mark McBride

Mark McBride

Library Senior Strategist, SUNY



Thursday November 8, 2018 10:30am - 11:15am EST
Grand Ballroom 3, Gaillard Center

10:30am EST

Throwing Back the Curtain: A Candid Conversation about Negotiating
Too often librarians are thrust into the position of having to negotiate with little or no training, experience or background. This can put them in a position where they are uncertain of how to establish and leverage relationships and can often lead to them missing out on opportunities. In addition, vendors often hire sales-people who lack an understanding of academic libraries, their culture and philosophies, which can at times hinder the development of effective relationships and limit sales. Further complicating this environment is the ongoing consolidation within the vendor marketplace, high turnover among sales representatives, disintermediation as content providers and publishers look to work directly with libraries and/or consumers, as well as tightening of library collection budgets. This session will bring together experienced librarians and vendors who will “pull back the curtain” and discuss strategies and approaches to negotiations that work for parties on both sides of the table. Librarians and vendors looking to have honest discussions about how we can work more effectively together when negotiating should attend this engaging and interactive session.

Moderators
avatar for Adam Chesler

Adam Chesler

Director, Global Sales, AIP Publishing

Speakers
avatar for Ashley Fast

Ashley Fast

Director, Collection Development and Workflow Solutions, Eastern US, GOBI Library Solutions from EBSCO
avatar for Jeremy Garskof

Jeremy Garskof

Director of TS, Gettysburg College
MO

Melissa Oakes

Sales Director, Government/Historical Collections, Alexander Street & Dissertations Archiving, ProQuest
avatar for Doug Way

Doug Way

Associate University Librarian for Collections and Research Services, University of Wisconsin-Madison
Doug Way is the associate university librarian for collections and research services at the University of Wisconsin-Madison where he provides leadership for the library's collection development and management, resource sharing, and scholarly communications programs. Doug has written... Read More →



Thursday November 8, 2018 10:30am - 11:15am EST
Grand Ballroom 2, Gaillard Center

11:30am EST

A Framework for Publishing Expansive Digital Humanities Projects
This session explores how research institutions can support publishing expansive digital humanities projects--i.e., projects that are interactive and dynamic in their content as they span and often grow over time across multiple content types, audiences, and contributors. The session will include a discussion of the Summer 2018 report "A Framework for Supporting Expansive Digital Publishing Projects," which is the result of a recent initiative at Duke University funded by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. Recognizing that the digital humanities are often not static, and change and grow as the scholarship and its community expands, the report addresses question such as what role can libraries and the institutions that back them play in planning, growing and sustaining these projects? How can institutions adequately evaluate and reward this type of scholarship, particularly when the audiences and collaborators for these publications extend beyond the academic community? And how can libraries, technologists, and humanities centers collaborate with university presses to "publish" these projects?

This session addresses five key areas of support for expansive digital publishing projects: 1) planning, 2) resource allocation and production; 3) discovery; 4) evaluation; and 5) preservation and sustainability. The session will address an overall framework for institutions, and especially libraries, to develop sustainable services in support of expansive digital publishing, and will also seek to engage session participants on how best to make meaningful, incremental progress at their local institutions to support publishing these expansive digital humanities projects.

Speakers
avatar for David Hansen

David Hansen

Associate University Librarian for Research, Collections & Scholarly Communication, Duke University
I'm Duke's librarian responsible for the Libraries' general research services and collections. My division of the library includes support for Duke researchers across the scholarly communication lifecycle, from the development of the library collections in anticipation of researcher... Read More →
avatar for Catherine Mitchell

Catherine Mitchell

Director, Publishing, Archives, and Digitization, California Digital Library, University of California


Thursday November 8, 2018 11:30am - 12:10pm EST
Salon II, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401, USA

11:30am EST

African and African American Studies Collections and Digital Resources
This panel offers two perspectives of increasing awareness of African and African American Studies collections and digital resources.

Over the last 10 years, the number of African and African American online collections and databases have nearly doubled. Adding these important resources to the library’s digital landscape brings a richness to research across disciplines and supports diversity and inclusion initiatives. While it is refreshing to see the increase in these tools, the authors are curious to discover the characteristics of ARL libraries providing access to or purchasing these materials. Objectives of this perspective is to share research--highlighting the trends and characteristics of ARL libraries providing access to these resources and to explore the criteria used to make decisions about new resources in area studies.

In a Journal of Academic Librarianship article from 2000, Susan A. Vega García wrote that “there is a dearth of empirical research that has examined multicultural diversity in terms of actual collecting patterns of academic and research libraries [...].” And yet, when diversity in the library field is even discussed, the focus is seldom on collections. This nearly-20- year-old article is one of the few that addresses African American Studies collections in the LIS literature. Vega García’s words have become only more germane in 2018: “The viewpoint that racial and ethnic materials are relevant only to their respective populations is an outdated and erroneous approach to collection development, especially for ARLs that must help prepare students for their entry into the real world.”

In this session, we will explore African and African American Studies collections’ importance to educational institutions’ intellectual life and the larger communities in which they are situated; brainstorm techniques for promoting these collections to internal and external audiences; and strategize collaborations with African and African American Studies liaison librarians.

Speakers
CB

Courtney Becks

Librarian for African American Studies and Jewish Studies Bibliographer, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
avatar for Charlene Maxey-Harris

Charlene Maxey-Harris

Research and Instructional Services Chair, University of Nebraska-Lincoln
I'm passionate about life and learning!
avatar for David Tyler

David Tyler

Collections Analyst & Strategist, University of Nebraska-Lincoln



Thursday November 8, 2018 11:30am - 12:10pm EST
Pinckney Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King Street, Charleston, SC 29403

11:30am EST

Decoding the Scholarly Resources Marketplace
Developed with input from a variety of library workers and industry representatives, this session will provide a current and concise introduction the scholarly resource marketplace for academic libraries, highlighting the financial and functional connections between major market actors providing services and content to libraries.

Discussions of vendor relations in libraries have often focused on the interpersonal collaboration of library workers and vendor representatives. In the process, they have overlooked or neglected the connections between publishers and vendors, their parent corporations and subsidiary companies.

Decoding requires a focus on vocabulary and building shared understanding of the marketplace for scholarly resources. In libraries, we may use vendor names as shorthand, creating a jargon barrier which can impede understanding and efforts. To this purpose, the speakers will provide succinct and clarifying descriptions and overviews of the market actors, their market shares, and their subsidiary and parent business relationships.

In this introductory session, the speakers will seek to decode and communicate the current scholarly resource marketplace, providing a practical overview to the market forces at play that should inform collection strategies and decision making.

Speakers
avatar for Lindsay Cronk

Lindsay Cronk

Head of Collection Strategies, University of Rochester
Lindsay Cronk is covered in tattoos and full of strong opinions.
avatar for Rachel Fleming

Rachel Fleming

Scholarly Communications Librarian, University of Tennessee at Chattanooga


11:30am EST

Demonstrating Library ROI: Success Stories and Strategies to Replicate in Your Library
Librarians face a number of obstacles in telling their ROI story. Our research has shown that one of the challenges is that the measures university administrators have traditionally used to define institutional ROI don’t translate well for the library. For example, while graduation and time-to-degree are essential to demonstrating the university’s story, they need not define the value of the library or be used to diminish the library’s story.

This is common knowledge among librarians, but administrators, some of whom you may be familiar with, often need guidance to understand how much value the library provides to the campus community without using student outcome measures. This panel will be made up of librarians who will share strategies on how they’ve successfully told their ROI story both internally and externally. The goal of this highly interactive session is to openly acknowledge the difficulties in communicating the library’s value in a supportive atmosphere and to inspire librarians with new and interesting ways to tell their own story back at their home institutions. The session will include ample time for Q&A with the audience.

Moderators
avatar for Kristi Ward

Kristi Ward

Director, Library Editorial, SAGE Publishing

Speakers
avatar for Melvin Davis

Melvin Davis

University Librarian, Coastal Carolina University
avatar for Rebecca Fernandez

Rebecca Fernandez

Head of Electronic Resources & Collection Manager, University of Texas at Tyler
Talk to me about anything!
avatar for Carol Tenopir

Carol Tenopir

Professor, University of Tennessee, School of Information Sciences
A frequent speaker at professional conferences and prolific author, Carol Tenopir is a Chancellor’s Professor at the University of Tennessee. For the last decade she has served on the Leadership Team of the NSF-funded DataONE project, which has brought together librarians, scientists... Read More →
NW

Nick Woolley

Director of Student and Library Services, Northumbria University
From Westminster, London, Nick is a graduate of the University of Exeter, the University of Sheffield, and London Metropolitan University. Nick is currently Director of Student and Library Services at Northumbria University and has worked in many different roles in several academic... Read More →


Thursday November 8, 2018 11:30am - 12:10pm EST
Grand Ballroom 1, Gaillard Center

11:30am EST

Discovery elsewhere: using the EDS API in mobile, voice searching, and beyond
As the discovery user experience continues to evolve, libraries are evaluating and implementing new approaches that deliver further engagement with the library’s collections. Indeed, at its core, the discovery index, a powerful, comprehensive and searchable listing of the library’s resources, can be meaningful outside of the immediate discovery environment. Consider these examples: the integration of discovery within the learning management system, within a Bento environment, within a mobile interface, within Alexa or Google Home, or within the ILS interface of the library’s choosing.

In this session panelists will examine the use of the EBSCO Discovery Service (EDS) API to enhance the discovery experience for users. Rob O’Connell from Smith College and Bill Mischo from the University of Illinois will discuss how their institutions implemented a new discovery experience based on Bento box discovery layers. This session will include a look at how these institutions designed, tested and implemented the new interface; the usability studies that went into shaping the current iteration, and improvements that are being considered for the future. In addition, David Podboy from EBSCO will look at different implementation options and additional ways to leverage the EBSCO Discovery Service (EDS) API in an array of environments – including Alexa, a mobile interface and the ILS – to further enhance the discovery experience for users.

Speakers
avatar for William H. Mischo

William H. Mischo

Head, Grainger Engineering Library Information Center and Berthold Family Professor in Information Access and Discovery, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
avatar for Rob O'Connell

Rob O'Connell

Director of Discovery, Access and Digital Engagement, Smith College Libraries
avatar for David Podboy

David Podboy

Principal Library Services Engineer, EBSCO
David is Principal Library Service Engineer and has been with EBSCO since March 2013. Prior to joining EBSCO, he worked in both academic and government libraries as a Reference and Instruction librarian and helped to select, implement, and maintain two discovery systems. As a LSE... Read More →



Thursday November 8, 2018 11:30am - 12:10pm EST
Cooper Room, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

11:30am EST

Getting E-Books into Courses: How Libraries can Partner with Faculty to Ease the Textbook Affordability Crisis
LOUIS, the library consortium for universities and colleges in Louisiana, funds affordable learning projects on an ongoing basis. Through these projects and individual efforts, LOUIS member libraries have undertaken a variety of approaches to encourage faculty to adopt no-cost or low-cost course material, to save students money. These approaches include strategies that leverage library collections and purchasing models to enable faculty to proactively select materials and design courses around affordability. To enable this, Louisiana State University librarians created a search tool and, building off this success, LOUIS partnered with GOBI to release a faculty portal. These tools enable faculty to search unlimited-user, DRM-free e-books alongside indexed Open Access materials and Open Textbooks. Faculty can select titles for purchase and the requests are routed to the appropriate institution for follow-up. This new collection-building model exposes faculty to publisher content during the course material selection process, proactively engaging the scholarly community. It is also a way for libraries to demonstrate meaningful usage and value to their institutions.
This panel will feature LOUIS-member librarians from the University of New Orleans and LSU to discuss the successes and challenges in engaging their faculty in this mission, and how library e-books, particularly DRM-free e-books, can offer economies for course curricula. It will also feature the perspective of a vendor, EBSCO, who is partnering with UNO on user testing to determine what the optimal course-linking solution is, leveraging course management systems. The panelists will share findings from this user research, aggregate data that illuminates how access models impact student use of library materials, as well as the results of a broad faculty study (undertaken in partnership with Library Journal) on the use of e-books in courses.

Speakers
avatar for David J. Comeaux

David J. Comeaux

Systems & Discovery Librarian, Louisiana State University
Dave is responsible for the management of the LSU Libraries’ online library services platforms. Dave provides vision, leadership, and creative thinking to manage and improve discovery of and access to analog and digital content. He also leads the creation, development, and implementation... Read More →
avatar for Kara Kroes Li

Kara Kroes Li

Director of Product Management, EBSCO
As Director of Product Management for EBSCO, Kara is responsible for understanding the needs of end-users, librarians, and publishers and distilling those needs into product initiatives. Her current areas of focus are user experience, librarian workflows, and partnerships. Prior to... Read More →
JP

Jeanne Pavy

Scholarly Communication & Collection Development Librarian, Earl K. Long Library
Scholarly communication, Open Access, copyright, creative commons, library-press partnerships



Thursday November 8, 2018 11:30am - 12:10pm EST
Grand Ballroom 3, Gaillard Center

11:30am EST

International Partnerships for Open-Access Models
Open access dissemination allows unrestricted and paywall-free access to scientific publications and is endorsed by a growing number of institutions and countries worldwide. In Europe, unified non-renewal of major publishers and public calls for change happen frequently whereas in North America, a dispersed purchasing landscape and private fee structure create barriers to mass support for OA negotiations. The financial viability of OA publishing differs radically across disciplines where APCs may or may not be an acceptable model. With OA cost models still in their infancy, this session explores three international partnerships making their way in the OA landscape.
OA2020 is an international initiative to advance OA by transforming scholarly publishing from its current subscription system to OA publishing. A growing number of US libraries have signed the OA2020 Expression of Interest. The first two presenters provide an overview of OA2020, its progress to date, and perspectives from their signatory institutions in gaining stakeholder support for repurposing subscription funds to support open access. The third presenter discusses how their OA2020 university library has collaborated with another US institution and two in Norway to build a new OA publishing platform: Vega, that offers structured-text authoring with multimedia capabilities, visual and flexible EDP workflows including open peer review, and a customizable reader front-end, making the possibility of more OA, media-rich, and interdisciplinary publishing a viable reality. Finally, the fourth speaker presents Érudit (erudit.org), a longstanding Canadian national research facility and publishing platform that has reworked its subscription-based dissemination model into an open-access partnership with the Canadian Knowledge Research Network (CRKN), which represents Canadian research libraries. Érudit offers aggregation services and financial support to over 140 HSS Canadian scholarly journals, published in French and English (97% already in OA). These four OA presenters will share successes and challenges in their goal towards fully OA publishing models.

Speakers
CB

Cheryl Ball

Director, Digital Publishing Collaborative, Wayne State University
avatar for Curtis Brundy

Curtis Brundy

AUL for Scholarly Communications and Collections, Iowa State University
I oversee collections and scholarly communications at Iowa State, which is a signatory of the OA2020 initiative. I am active with several groups that are interested in seeing, as well as assisting, scholarly publishers and societies transition to open business models.
TM

Tiffany Moxham

AUL for Collections and Scholarly Communications Strategies, University of California, Riverside
avatar for Emilie Paquin

Emilie Paquin

Director Research & Strategic Development, erudit.org


Thursday November 8, 2018 11:30am - 12:10pm EST
Salon I, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401, USA

11:30am EST

It’s that critical: choosing and creating a discovery experience that users crave
In today’s world, choice is paramount. When libraries choose their discovery service they are naturally looking for best-in-breed. And there is a lot to consider: the user interface, the content that can be incorporated, the relevance and value ranking and the ability to tailor the solution for specific research needs. What is certain is that more often than not, one size does not fit all. Each institution in fact has its own requirements and different types of users have different needs. From discipline specific support to catalog integration, there is much to consider when setting up the discovery service.

In this session panelists will look at the diverse considerations when choosing and implementing a discovery service. Panelists will discuss different configuration and customization options that are available to libraries, what libraries can do independently, and where vendor support comes in. Topics include branding, profile options, catalog and IR loading, linking, and website integration.

Speakers
JN

Jeanette Norris

Metadata Management Librarian, Brown University
avatar for Adam Shire

Adam Shire

Systems & User Experience Librarian, Douglas D. Schumann Library & Learning Commons Wentworth Institute of Technology
Library stuff, but also:BicyclesSchool of HonkMakerspaces


11:30am EST

Librarians are the enemies of scholarship!* Print collection management during a major renovation
The University of Virginia is preparing for a complete renovation of its main library, an endeavor which has caused no shortage of angst for patrons who are concerned about the accessibility and vitality of the collection during a years-long renewal project. One of the key concerns is the removal of 80% of the books to near-site storage, leaving only 500,000 titles available on central grounds. After all, how can researchers and students in the humanities serendipitously browse collections if most of them are off in storage?

In this session, we will discuss how the University of Virginia is addressing researcher and student concerns to create a vibrant and useful corpus of materials during a time of significant disruption to library collections and services. We will give an overview of our community engagement processes in creating an interim collection, discuss our philosophy of what the interim and post-renovation collections should look like, and provide a deep dive into our quantitative and qualitative metrics informing the selection process for rehousing items during the renovation.

Our intent is to provide session attendees with tools which can be adapted for their individual library infrastructure projects. In addition, we will offer information on our successes and failures so that attendees can learn from our experiences to thoughtfully and proactively engage with their communities around collections issues, help manage rumors, and create a shared vision of a revitalized library for future scholars.

*Yes, that is an actual quote from one of our scholars.

Speakers
BB

Beth Blanton-Kent

Collections Librarian, University of Virginia Library
TM

Timothy Morton

Manager, Resource Acquisition & Description, University of Virginia Library


11:30am EST

Library Outreach: An International Perspective On Successful Strategies
The arrival of new media and learning technologies is remaking the library in many ways. As librarians’ roles change (particularly in the service of academic STEM patrons), they need new strategies to maintain their relevance. As part of this, they must leave (sometimes physically) the traditional confines of their libraries and offices and engage with faculty and students.

To assist in promoting outreach strategies, JoVE is awarding four librarians from around the world with a scholarship to attend the Charleston Conference. These librarians will have demonstrated proven best outreach practices in their respective institutions/countries. The obstacles to outreach are many: Along with the stream of STEM discoveries, there are now ebooks, multimedia channels, and much more nontraditional types of content. Many students don’t have the traditional library search habits or skills. During the comparative session, these librarians will provide examples of their successful outreach campaigns; tips on outreach empowerment; and insight into overall challenges/successes for libraries. They will offer cross-national viewpoints and discuss the various problems they faced and how they overcame them for successful outreach.

Moderators
avatar for Eglantine Ronfard

Eglantine Ronfard

Marketing Manager, JoVE

Speakers
avatar for Bertha Chang

Bertha Chang

Associate Head, Collections & Research Strategy, NC State University Libraries
Bertha Chang is Associate Head of Collections & Research Strategy at the North Carolina State University Libraries. She holds an M.S. from the Graduate School of Library and Information Science at the University of Illinois in Urbana-Champaign, and an S.B. and Ph.D. from the Department... Read More →
avatar for Dorit van Moppes

Dorit van Moppes

Librarian, Ben Gurion University
My perspective derives from, and continues to be colored by, my personal journey from M.Sc. in Life Sciences to M.A. in information Science—from manager of a large laboratory of undergraduate and graduate students (developing the biotechnology for bio-products from red microalgae... Read More →
avatar for Jennifer Park

Jennifer Park

Assistant Librarian for Access and Outreach Services, Mount Saint Mary College
As the Assistant Librarian for Access and Outreach Services at Mount Saint Mary College, I have two primary job responsibilities. The first is overseeing our Access Services department which includes InterLibrary Loan, student staff coordination, and stack management. My second major... Read More →
avatar for Lucie Tryoen

Lucie Tryoen

Electronic Resources Librarian, University of Evry-Val d'Essonne (France)



11:30am EST

Literary Hoaxes: Fraud or Not Really?
Literary hoaxes infuriate publishers because they make them look like fools. And then there's all the money they threw away.
If you carefully go through the elements of fraud, however, many of these cases could seemingly go either way.
Bill Hannay and Bruce Strauch will examine the Clifford Irving/Howard Hughes hoax and others and give their wry analysis.

Speakers
avatar for William M. Hannay

William M. Hannay

Partner, Schiff Hardin LLP
Bill Hannay regularly counsels corporations and individuals with respect to federal and state antitrust law, intellectual property law, and other trade regulation laws. He is an Adjunct Professor, teaching courses at IIT/Chicago-Kent law school in antitrust and international business... Read More →
avatar for Bruce Strauch

Bruce Strauch

Professor of Business Law, Retired, The Citadel
Bruce Strauch, J.D. is a retired Professor of Business Law and Director of the Citadel Mentors Program. He holds degrees from UNC-Chapel Hill and Oxford, is extensively published in the field of copyright and trademark, is the author of nine novels and the publisher of a trade journal... Read More →


11:30am EST

Much Ado about eBooks: Making Sense of Access Models
EBooks are a vital part of today’s library, but the growing number of purchase and loan models, combined with complicated setup, maintenance, and access issues, can pose challenges to any library. This session will shed light on eBook purchase models (particularly EBA and DDA), and help you make the best decision for your library. This session includes speakers from three different universities sharing their thoughts and experiences. Melissa Belvadi will focus on some philosophical problems with EBA and then discuss how UPEI is handling the logistical problems of combining DDA, EBA, subscription, and firm orders in their catalogue. Stew MacLehose will discuss the variety of DDA loan programs available and the solution UNE arrived at using a combination of models that save money, increase usage, and satisfy UNE student and faculty needs. Joe Marciniak will present data from UWG’s recent DDA program.

Speakers
avatar for Melissa Belvadi

Melissa Belvadi

User Experience & Collections Librarian, University of Prince Edward Island
Academic collections management and analysis, particularly electronic books and serials. How to squeeze every last penny of value from our depressingly small budget. User experience in electronic products and optimizing discoverability experience. Data visualization. Google Sheets... Read More →
avatar for Stew MacLehose

Stew MacLehose

Digital Services & Systems Librarian, University of New England
avatar for Joe Marciniak

Joe Marciniak

Electronic Resources Librarian, The University of West Georgia



Thursday November 8, 2018 11:30am - 12:10pm EST
Colonial Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel

11:30am EST

One login, one time; the way to easy and unlimited access
A library user’s online experience must ensure easy, quick and secure access to resources by eliminating multiple logins and - at the same time - securing the user’s privacy rights. Key stakeholders discuss their experiences with OpenAthens in providing such seamless, secure authentication. Representatives from two different organizations discuss their discovery service, the power of single sign-on and the need to both solicit and secure user information. Stephen Ambra, Library Director at NHTI recently transitioned from proxy services to OpenAthens authentication services. Lucy Harrison, Executive Director of GALILEO, Georgia’s virtual library system, is in the implementation phase of OpenAthens for their entire system of libraries. This session will look at why OpenAthens was chosen to complement their services. Learn how NHTI is managing its resource investments more effectively and what GALILEO has planned for its system-wide rollout of OpenAthens.

Speakers
SA

Stephen Ambra

Library Director, NHTI Concord’s Community College
avatar for Lucy Harrison

Lucy Harrison

Executive Director of GALILEO, Board of Regents of the University System of Georgia
Statewide consortia; large-scale e-resource licensing; GALILEO; discovery; OpenAthens; Affordable Learning Georgia; OER; open textbooks; textbook alternatives
avatar for Christopher Holly

Christopher Holly

Director of SaaS Innovation, EBSCO
FOLIO, Software as a Service, OpenAthens, Stacks, EBSCO Discovery Service, Library Systems Management, Strategic Planning


Thursday November 8, 2018 11:30am - 12:10pm EST
Grand Ballroom 2, Gaillard Center

11:30am EST

Other Duties as Assigned: A Reexamination of Roles in Resource Acquisition and Management
As our technology, environment, and future continues to shift and morph, we are required to be agile and responsive with our work in order for our institutions to continue to be relevant. Yet, many acquisitions and collections teams are operating with mildly modified job descriptions dating back to the organizational norms of the past thirty (or more) years. How can we respect and honor the past labor of our current workforce while simultaneously requesting them to cease and/or alter those core job functions? How can we align our employees with new initiatives in consideration of their skills and interests? Are “paraprofessional” and “professional” helpful or harmful categories in today’s market?
In this talk, we will explore the attitudes surrounding staff support positions in technical services held by individuals with an MLIS degrees as demonstrated through a survey. Presenters will share challenges, solutions, and suggested pathways to change. Discussion will be encouraged as we share similar challenges, but often in different environments. Attendees can expect to leave with an understanding of the trends in technical services duties that may assist in fostering positive flexibility and room for growth in their organizations.

Speakers
avatar for Rachel Arkoosh

Rachel Arkoosh

Collections Librarian, Pacific University
Rachel Arkoosh is the technical services librarian at Pacific University. Her responsibilities include acquisitions, cataloging, serials, electronic resources and all other things technical services.
avatar for Christine Fischer

Christine Fischer

Head of Technical Services and Associate Professor, UNC Greensboro
Christine Fischer is the Head of Technical Services at UNC Greensboro, where she has worked since 2005. She has an interest in streaming film, acquisition models, and organizational culture. She has held positions in academic and special libraries in both public and technical ser... Read More →



Thursday November 8, 2018 11:30am - 12:10pm EST
Gold Ballroom, Francis Marion Hotel

11:30am EST

Platforms, not publishers! An update on sex workers, free speech, and the increased risk for hosting content
Over 20 years ago, the U.S. Congress passed Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, a landmark piece of legislation which protected Internet platforms from liability for user generated content -- a distinction from the editorial determinations made by publishers. This year, Congress passed the Fight Online Sex Trafficking Act (FOSTA), reducing liability protections in Section 230 for certain types of speech. Targeted at sex trafficking, the new law not only immediately threatens the safety of sex workers, but also encroaches on the protections afforded online archives that host third party content, leading both the Electronic Frontier Foundation and the Internet Archive to file suit to block the law. Further, the rise of fake news and partisan manipulators of platform content place further pressure on Internet hosts to take a more active editorial role, threatening the safe harbor of Section 230. We’ll discuss the threats to information sharing, users, and free speech in this open conversation.

Speakers
avatar for Peter Brantley

Peter Brantley

Director, Online Strategy, UC Davis
avatar for Mary Minow

Mary Minow

Affiliate at Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society, Harvard University



Thursday November 8, 2018 11:30am - 12:10pm EST
Laurens Room, Francis Marion Hotel 387 King St, Charleston, SC 29403, USA

11:30am EST

Preparing Researchers for Publishing Success: How Libraries Are Impacting Outcomes
Researchers today are under more pressure to publish than ever before. Not only must they secure the financial resources necessary to carry out their research, but they must also publish in high impact journals in order to advance in their careers and achieve notoriety in the scientific community. External pressure is equally high, as institutions rely on the publishing success of their researchers to secure ongoing funding and continue to attract and retain the best scholars admist a very competitive environment.

In order to meet these needs, libraries are increasingly taking proactive steps to ensure that their researchers are equipped with the skills necessary to become successfully published authors. From leveraging online resources and courses to implementing interactive training programs, librarians are pursuing a variety of approaches to ensure researchers are adequately prepared for every step of the publishing process. By focusing on core competencies like grant writing, article submission, manuscript preparation, peer review and more, the library is increasingly assuming a pivotal, underserved role in the research lifecycle.

In this session, Wiley will facilitate a lively discussion of librarians from a spectrum of institutions to explore how libraries can support their researchers’ publishing training needs. Attendees can expect to learn more about:
• The training needs of today’s early career researchers
• Opportunities for library leadership and support
• The criteria necessary for a successful training program
• Best practices for implementing a training program and generating awareness, usage and engagement
• Case studies that offer real-world application

Attendees will benefit from the multiple perspectives of experienced librarians who are currently pursuing different methods to support the publishing needs of their researchers. They will share critical insights related to how these publishing support programs are integrated into their overall library strategies, the objectives they hope to address on both research and institutional levels, and how such methods can be implemented at other institutions across the country.

Speakers
avatar for Beth Bernhardt

Beth Bernhardt

Consortia Account Manager, Oxford University Press/ Previously at UNC Greensboro
Beth works for Oxford University Press as a Consortia Account Manager. Before coming to OUP she was the Assistant Dean for Collection Management and Scholarly Communications at UNC Greensboro. Beth has served as the Principle Program Director for the Charleston Conference since... Read More →
KM

Kate McCready

Interim AUL for Content & Collections, University of Minnesota Libraries
Kate McCready is the Director of the Content Services department which is comprised of Interlibrary Loan and the Open Scholarship and Publishing Services [OSPS] unit within the University Libraries. OSPS provides Copyright Permissions Services, and Publishing Services. Kate is responsible... Read More →
GS

George Stachokas

Electronic Resources Librarian, Auburn University
avatar for Gwen Taylor

Gwen Taylor

Business Development Manager, Wiley Researcher Academy, Wiley


11:30am EST

Seasons of Change: Digital Preservation in an Ever-Changing Digital Environment
The NASIG Digital Preservation Task Force is charged to, “...identify new roles for librarians and publishers as well as the impact of these changes on preservation in an ever-changing digital environment, and develop some best practices for the industry. The task force will identify ways in which NASIG can be involved in proactive digital preservation, including tools for marketing digital preservation to a broad range of library administrations and publishers.” To that end, the committee created a survey to learn how NASIG could best direct its efforts in raising awareness and supporting digital preservation initiatives today. The survey is scheduled to be released in late September through early October 2018, and the task force will begin to analyze the results in November. At the Charleston Conference the committee proposes to present some of the early findings of the survey in the framework of discussing the current state of digital preservation initiatives broadly across the profession. Through a panel discussion, with representatives from different aspects of the community, libraries, publishers, vendors, etc. attendees to this presentation will learn about current best practices in digital preservation, recent developments in the field, and the development of NASIG’s role in supporting digital preservation.

Speakers
avatar for Robert Wainwright Boissy

Robert Wainwright Boissy

Account Development Director, Springer Nature
I have had various roles in scholarly publishing since 2003, and fifteen years as a subscription agent before that. I have library degrees from the University at Albany and Syracuse University. I like to talk about cooperative marketing projects between libraries and publishers... Read More →
avatar for Shannon Keller

Shannon Keller

Helen Bernstein Librarian for Periodicals and Journals, New York Public Library
avatar for Heather Staines

Heather Staines

Director Business Development, MIT Knowledge Futures Group



11:30am EST

Strong Collections, Controlled Costs: Weathering the Winter Storm Through Collaboration and a Shared Acquisitions Program
Can three libraries with different needs and goals successfully work together to build a strong shared collection and contain costs? This talk will highlight the practical aspects of how the CTW Consortium in Connecticut deployed a consortial print approval plan, complementary EBA ebook plans and a fulfillment network in order to save money while building a collection that meets patron needs. CTW, formed in 1987, is a consortium of Connecticut College, Trinity College and Wesleyan University. Each campus has a separate Alma catalog joined to the others through a shared fulfillment network, which allows users at each campus to request book delivery from the other two. Starting in November 2016, the consortium built on this successful service by implementing a shared print approval program that was modeled on a similar program at Colby, Bates and Bowdoin. Each school had its own reasons for sharing print purchases, including the desire to reduce duplication, save funds spent on print, move away from DDA, and lessen the workload of selectors. Since the implementation of the print approval plan, CTW’s institutions have made several big changes, including cancelling DDA programs (at two of the schools) and adding JSTOR and Project Muse EBA plans. For at least one school, the plan has been extremely helpful in making decisions about collection budget reductions. In this talk, speakers will share the current state of the approval plan, along with metrics gathered before and after plan implementation, such as circulation data, planned versus actual expenditures, collection duplication, patron perceptions and selector impressions of the plan. Speakers will also discuss the next steps for the program and grapple with some lingering questions, such as how far the consortium should go toward becoming a truly “shared collection,” and the implications this may hold for reserve services and collection growth.

Speakers
avatar for Kathleen Bauer

Kathleen Bauer

Director Collections, Discovery and Access Services, Trinity College (Hartford, Connecticut)
avatar for Fred Folmer

Fred Folmer

Director, Collections and Resource Management, Connecticut College
avatar for Lorraine Huddy

Lorraine Huddy

Librarian for Collaborative Projects, CTW Library Consortium
avatar for Aaron Sandoval

Aaron Sandoval

Monographic Acquisitions Librarian/Coordinator of Collection Development, Wesleyan University



Thursday November 8, 2018 11:30am - 12:10pm EST
Calhoun Room, Francis Marion Hotel

11:30am EST

The Other Impact Factor
Sponsored by AAAS

Since its founding in 1848, AAAS was always open to all. With the movement for Civil Rights in the1960’s and women's rights in the early 1970’s, the organization undertook programs and adopted policies to more actively promote diversity and inclusion in STEM.  AAAS has also enjoyed diversity in its governance – including that forty percent of AAAS presidents have been women.  This presentation will provide a brief overview of AAAS efforts, past, present and future, to support diversity, inclusion, and excellence in science.

Speakers
avatar for Shirley M. Malcom

Shirley M. Malcom

Director, Education and Human Resources Programs (EHR), AAAS

Sponsors
avatar for AAAS/Science

AAAS/Science

The American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) is the world’s largest general scientific society. AAAS is the publisher of the journals Science, Science Translational Medicine; Science Signaling; Science Immunology; Science Robotics and the open-access journal, Science... Read More →


Thursday November 8, 2018 11:30am - 12:10pm EST
Colonial Ballroom, Embassy Suites

11:30am EST

Stopwatch Session
These short “pecha kucha-like” sessions will feature four PowerPoint presentations of 6 minutes and 40 seconds each. We will have time at the end of the session intended for Q&A for all presenters. Come for a lively, rapid-fire group of talks.

1) Monitoring Open Access with CHORUS (Howard Ratner, CHORUS)

Trying to monitor publicly funded research published by your researchers in response to evolving funder mandates? Learn how CHORUS leverages the existing publishing process and uses standard metadata to identify and monitor open access to content and datasets reporting on funded research, provides links to open access versions of content datasets, and verifies that the research is saved in preservation archives  

2) One More Scholarly Horizon to Automate: Manuscript Submission and Exchange (Nettie Lagace, NISO)

The NISO MECA (Manuscript Exchange Common Approach) project is creating a Recommended Practice to allow members of the scholarly communication ecosystem to easily transfer manuscripts and associated data and metadata between and among manuscript systems. The Internet has changed scholarly communication in every aspect. For the publication process, it has made it possible to do much of the work of managing manuscript submission, peer review, and production electronically. However, situations exist where manuscripts may move from one system to another: perhaps the article has not been accepted at one journal, and the author would like to submit it to another publisher; perhaps the publisher would like to offer the author an option to submit in another one of its own journals; perhaps it is desired that a preprint server transfer a manuscript or receive a manuscript. In many of these cases, stakeholders such as article authors or reviewers may be required to manually re-enter data, or may not be aware of existing data that may be useful in a new setting. This NISO Recommended Practice will represent a generally-applicable exchange protocol that could also represent many use cases and varied stakeholders.

3) Corralling Electronic Resources Management with CORAL Open Source (Tina M. Adams, Western Carolina University) 

Are you frustrated with trying to keep up with workflows, policies, licenses, package changes, renewal deadlines, ILL rights and perpetual access status of all the electronic resources you manage? Are you tired of managing myriad spreadsheets and calendar ticklers? Would you like use a tool that allows you to have this information in a central location where everyone from Collections staff to ILL staff can access the information they need to do their jobs? Would you like that tool to be free? If so, come see how Western Carolina University has transitioned from no ERM system to using CORAL, an open source ERM system with loads of functionality. Attendees will learn how we implemented CORAL at our library with very few staff and how we are continuing to refine how we use this tool. See if it might be the answer for your library.

4) Systematic Failures - Are They Solely the Fault of the Systems? (Tonia Graves, Old Dominion University) 

Since the advent of the academic journal in the 17th century, the myriad of systems developed to provide organization and access to these texts for use by scholars and students have failed to efficiently address the familiar litany of questions surrounding journals and their construct. Examples of repeatedly raised questions include: Do you have this title?; What years and volumes do you have for this title?; What titles do you have on this subject?; Where is this title located?; Is it peer reviewed?; Is there full text?
Since journals often represent the bulk of an academic library’s materials budget, these failures are not satisfactory, nor are they solely the fault of the systems.

This presentation highlights impacts of migrating to a new LPS in 2016 and completing a library wide staff reorganization in 2018 on the human resources and systems used in the Electronic Resources Management Unit. I will share our strategies for addressing the traditionally troubling aspects of journal access to optimize staff skills and ensure a successful access experience for users.

Moderators
avatar for Cris Ferguson

Cris Ferguson

Assistant Dean of Libraries / Associate Professor, Murray State University

Speakers
avatar for Tina M. Adams

Tina M. Adams

Electronic Resources Librarian, Western Carolina University
I am currently the Electronic Resources Librarian at Western Carolina University. I had been a Reference and Instruction and Distance Education librarian for over a decade before transitioning to E-resources. I recently co-authored a book, The ABC's of ERM: Demystifying Electronic... Read More →
avatar for Tonia Graves

Tonia Graves

Resource Discovery Librarian, Old Dominion University
I am the Resource Discovery Librarian at Old Dominion University Libraries. My responsibilities include analyzing the impact of discovery systems on the University community, studying the impact of Section 508 on academic library procurement practices, and serving as the chair person... Read More →
avatar for Nettie Lagace

Nettie Lagace

Associate Executive Director, NISO - National Information Standards Organization
Nettie Lagace is the Associate Executive Director at NISO, where she is responsible for facilitating the work of NISO's topic committees and development groups for standards and best practices, and working with the community to encourage broad adoption of this consensus work. Prior... Read More →
avatar for Howard Ratner

Howard Ratner

Executive Director, CHORUS
Howard is the Executive Director of CHORUS. Over the past two decades, he played a key role in developing innovative technology solutions that have transformed scholarly communications. He co-founded and chaired ORCID – Open Researcher and Contributor ID system, and was active... Read More →



Thursday November 8, 2018 11:30am - 12:10pm EST
Ashley Room, Courtyard Marriott 125 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401

12:10pm EST

Lunch On Your Own
Thursday November 8, 2018 12:10pm - 1:00pm EST
TBA

12:30pm EST

Integration and Innovation - Building the future of teaching, learning, and research
Lunch sponsored by ProQuest. RSVP required.

Explore the trends that are shaping the outlook for academic libraries in this informative luncheon.
You’ll meet ProQuest Chief Technology Officer Roger Valade, as he takes you on a fascinating tour of how ProQuest is blending technology with user experience data to support better research, better learning and better insights.

Get an insider’s look at what it takes to…
  • Improve user workflows with unified access to six centuries of vetted, authoritative content – from dissertations, news, historical primary sources and videos to journals and ebooks.
  • Help libraries get the most value from their budgets through innovative buying models
This session will conclude with a lively discussion on future ProQuest education and technology solutions. Plus, sign up to preview ProQuest’s upcoming enhanced platform at your institution before its general release.

Space is limited.  Reserve your spot today by signing up at: https://proquestcharlestonlunch18.eventbrite.com

Speakers
avatar for Roger Valade

Roger Valade

Chief Technology Officer, ProQuest
Roger Valade, Chief Technology Officer, leads ProQuest's global technology organization. He is responsible for client-facing systems including the ProQuest Platform, Ebook Central and ProQuest Dialog. Additionally, he is responsible for all back-office and infrastructure across the... Read More →

Sponsors
avatar for ProQuest and Ex Libris

ProQuest and Ex Libris

ProQuest is committed to supporting the important work happening in the world’s research and learning communities. The company curates content that matters to the advancement of knowledge, assembling an archive of billions of vetted, indexed documents. It simplifies workflows so... Read More →


Thursday November 8, 2018 12:30pm - 2:00pm EST
Colonial Ballroom, Embassy Suites

12:30pm EST

On the Winds of Change- Repositories, Researchers and Technologies (the 18th Health Sciences Lively Lunchtime Discussion)
RSVP Requested
Sponsored by Rittenhouse

This year’s sponsored but no holds barred health sciences lively lunchtime gathering is open to all. It will begin with greetings from luncheon sponsor, Rittenhouse. Moderator Jean Gudenas will introduce the session and will provide some introductory remarks about this year’s three presentations: a report on a survey, a report on a research study, and a technology update. All three topics should provide fodder for lively discussion at the end.

Ramune Kubilius will provide a brief annual traditional update on developments in the health sciences publishing world. She will then segue to highlighting some findings from a survey she and two co-authors conducted in early 2018 of AAHSL (Association of Academic Health Sciences Libraries) members on medical school institutional repositories. She will focus on responses related to collections and formats housed in respondents’ repositories and some other survey responses of a scholarly communication nature.

Are early career researchers the harbingers of change? Anthony Watkinson will share some findings from a three year (2015-2018) worldwide CIBER longitudinal research study on early career researchers that was commissioned by the Publishing Research Consortium. He will focus on highlighting what medical researchers in countries, including the U.S., where surveys were conducted, think about scholarly communications and scholarly publishing.

Does the RA21 project hold promise for keeping access secure in the future? There is no doubt that all libraries, and particularly health sciences libraries, have an interest in and mandate to provide secure access to content. John Felts will provide a broad approach to the topic, beginning with background and a review of some current technologies. He will then provide some insights as to what expectations we can have from initiatives such as RA21, with its mission: “to align and simplify pathways to subscribed content across participating scientific platforms…”

Speakers
avatar for John Felts

John Felts

Head of Library Technology, Coastal Carolina University
John is currently the Head of Library Technology and Systems at Coastal Carolina University. He has worked in library technology for 30 years and is a former patent holder and co-founder of Journal Finder, the first OpenURL Resolver and knowledge base to go into production in the... Read More →
avatar for Jean Gudenas

Jean Gudenas

Associate Professor, Director of Information Resources and Collection Services, Medical University of South Carolina
Jean Gudenas joined the MUSC Libraries faculty in 2017 as the Director of Information Resources and Collection Services. In this role, Jean leads a team of dedicated workers to deliver information across the campus, whether through the acquisition of resources, direct access to our... Read More →
RK

Ramune Kubilius

Collection Development / Special Projects Librarian, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Galter Health Sciences Library & Learning Center
avatar for Anthony Watkinson

Anthony Watkinson

Principal Consultant, CIBER Research

Sponsors
avatar for Rittenhouse

Rittenhouse

Rittenhouse Book Distributors Inc. provides libraries with print and eBooks in the fields of medicine, nursing and allied health from the leading health sciences publishers.



Thursday November 8, 2018 12:30pm - 2:00pm EST
39 Rue de Jean

1:00pm EST

ATG Trend Talk
Presentation and further discussion from the ATG Trend Lab meeting. More information coming soon.

Speakers
avatar for Kiyomi Deards

Kiyomi Deards

Subject Librarian for Chemistry, Biochemistry, Forensic Science, Physics & Astronomy, and Water, University of Nebraska-Lincoln
Kiyomi Diane Deards is the librarian for Chemistry, Biochemistry, Forensic Science, Physics & Astronomy, and Water at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln University Libraries. She writes and presents about issues of management and equity in libraries; and science literacy, education... Read More →
avatar for Lisa Hinchliffe

Lisa Hinchliffe

Professor/Coordinator for Information Literacy Services and Instruction in the University Library, University of Illinois
avatar for Athena Hoeppner

Athena Hoeppner

Discovery Services Librarian, University of Central Florida Libraries
avatar for Heather Staines

Heather Staines

Director Business Development, MIT Knowledge Futures Group
avatar for Katina Strauch

Katina Strauch

Founder and Convener, Charleston Conference


Thursday November 8, 2018 1:00pm - 2:15pm EST
Salon I, Gaillard Center 95 Calhoun Street, Charleston, SC 29401, USA

1:00pm EST

Digital Rights Management: A Long and Winding Road to DRM-free Ebooks in Academic Libraries
"Fair use and other exceptions to copyright law that libraries have relied on for decades to loan print titles have been mostly inapplicable to ebooks because of Digital Rights Management (DRM). Libraries, who are regularly called on to justify and maximize their expenditures, cannot help but see DRM-free titles as an attractive value, as they offer the freedom to let patrons access content when—and in the format—they want. But questions remain: Are DRM-free titles used more than their DRM-enabled counterparts? Are libraries making sound investments by seeking out DRM-free titles? As more titles are released (including to large aggregators), the accumulating data allows us to begin measuring the impact of DRM-free.

Not until recently have publishers started to pay closer attention to librarian and user feedback. A recent Library Journal survey revealed that 74 percent of students using libraries believe there should be no restrictions placed on ebooks; 66 percent prefer to use ebooks with no restrictions; and a whopping 37 percent only use ebooks in their research that have no restrictions. This translates to over one third of scholarly ebooks in U.S. libraries not getting discovered because the majority of titles continue to be distributed with DRM encryption. With usage playing an increasingly important role in library acquisitions, how much are publishers risking by keeping their content under strict protections?

Moderated by Mirela Roncevic, Director of No Shelf Required, and echoing the voices of professionals with experience with DRM from library, publisher and vendor perspectives, this panel seeks to clarify the benefits of providing DRM-free content to library patrons without harming anyone in the ebook ecosystem, as well as to elucidate a range of DRM-related issues posing as possible threats to publisher and library sustainability. This session is designed to further the discussion about the state of the market, the realities of DRM-free usage and how we can continue to develop new approaches of providing academic resources in formats that meet patrons’ needs.
"

Moderators
MR

Mirela Roncevic

Director, No Shelf Required

Speakers
BA

Ben Ashcroft

Vice President, Sales and Marketing, De Gruyter
avatar for Alison Bradley

Alison Bradley

Director, Strategic Initiatives, PALCI
avatar for Angela Dresselhaus

Angela Dresselhaus

Head of Electronic Resources, Eastern Carolina University
avatar for Kara Kroes Li

Kara Kroes Li

Director of Product Management, EBSCO
As Director of Product Management for EBSCO, Kara is responsible for understanding the needs of end-users, librarians, and publishers and distilling those needs into product initiatives. Her current areas of focus are user experience, librarian workflows, and partnerships. Prior to... Read More →
avatar for Kari Paulson

Kari Paulson

VP - Market Development, Books, ProQuest
DS

Dean Smith

Director, Cornell University Press


Thursday November 8, 2018 1:00pm - 2:15pm EST
Grand Ballroom 2, Gaillard Center

1:00pm EST